Tuesday, 14 October 2014

Dedicated to Kevins Everywhere

Regular readers know the format by now. Since TR was imposed on 1st June, Sunday's blog post is usually a roundup of omnishambles horror stories that have come in to the blog over the preceding week. 

We're almost up to week 20 since the world-class Probation Service was smashed and split asunder, but it's only Tuesday and I've already got a full blog post's worth of horror stories. Given that the MoJ are still spinning the line that everything is just 'fine and dandy', with a few 'teething' problems, I thought I'd disabuse them of this delusion early this week.

I'm also publishing now because of the serious nature of the information that's coming in, and as a public service for the benefit of privateers currently waiting on tenter hooks for news about the success or otherwise of their attempt at getting a slice of the probation pie. It's your last chance to walk away unscathed from this utter disaster. 

Actually, it's also specifically aimed at the 'Kevins' of this world. That new breed of CRC CEO who are currently spinning loads of bollocks about how things are running smoothly at the behest of their current MoJ masters. Typically breezy, here's what Kevin says:-
Since we became The Cumbria and Lancashire CRC in June summer has come and gone. I hope you’ve had a great one, whether you’ve been away, enjoyed day trips out or simply took time off to catch up with some DIY jobs around the home, like myself.

We’ve now been operational for just over four months and I wanted to give a short update on our progress so far.
To recap, in June 2014 the probation service split into two. The National Probation Service (NPS) now manages all high risk work and 21 Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) manage all medium to low risk work – this led to the launch of the new Cumbria and Lancashire CRC.
Since the separation, the CRC senior managers have been meeting regularly with NPS colleagues to manage the changes and have developed an interface agreement, which has established new working arrangements. Together we have mapped out new procedures and processes and worked closely with each other to deal with any early issues being highlighted as a result of the change. The CRC has achieved a lot in the short space of time, since June we have:  
  • Developed our business plan 
  • Delivered on our interim contract with the National OffenderManagement Service (NOMS) 
  • Held regular interface meetings with the NPS at local and regional levels 
  • Launched our new Positive Futures Offender supervision model
  • Developed our vision and values 
  • Taken over the responsibility for six attendance centres  
The next few months will continue to be equally busy as we move forward with the Government’s Transforming Rehabilitation Programme. One of our priorities will be to support the NPS to operate independently from us by theend of October, alongside preparing for share sale and private ownership towards the end of the year.
If you want some more information about the changes or the work we are doing, please contact us.
Kevin
And here's what people on the frontline say:-

Our CRC is carrying on regardless and doing their best to fit a square peg into a round hole. They are determined, at all costs, to make TR work. Recent instructions from management is to make sure all Orders are sent back to court for revocation for good progress as soon as they reach the halfway stage because if someone's on a 12mth order and it's revoked at the 6mth mark, then there is 6mths less chance of them committing another offence whilst subject to statutory supervision which would result in a 'fail'. It is disregarded that whilst the person is doing ok that they may need until the end of the whole 12mths as support. Also remember that the final 6mths supervision with a CRC only equates to 3 supervision appointments ie one every eight weeks so is it too much for offenders not be entitled to this support which can be in the guise of accommodation or training & employment advice? 

Revocation at the halfway stage also drastically reduces the amount of breaches that will need doing - again another 'no no' in the world of private enterprise. Successful drug programme completions must be worth ££ too because we've been instructed to get the element revoked as soon as a few negatives have been put in. Again better to revoke whilst 'clean' rather than allow the element to continue and they maybe have a relapse which would be bad for targets. It seems ££ is going to be paid for not just the overall CO/SSO but the individual elements too, hence the panic to revoke.

Given the above then possibly some private companies may do well from TR but I can't help feeling that it's at the expense of those who are down on their luck. I also wonder about future sentencing options should they re-offend in the near future post revocation - if I were a magistrate and told that X had had a recent period of supervision then what's the sentencing alternative because they can't keep giving revolving supervision. Courts will be looking at more punitive sanctions ie curfews or short sharp shock prison sentences. I just know when I go into supervision my SPO is going to be going through my caseload, not interested in work I've done with offenders, but checking why I haven't revoked X, Y and Z.

******

So this is how "professional judgement" is to be exercised in the future!! Need to bring to attention of local JNNC reps.

******

Why the surprise? Creaming and parking is the way these companies work. We all know it and said so before TR started. Services will be designed to secure the illusion of outcomes. The needs of the offenders and our communities was never a consideration.

******

Supervision by the private sector has nothing to do with the rehabilitation of offenders.
Successful outcomes will be measured by a claim of financial reward, and have nothing to do with the impact that period of supervision has on the individual being supervised.
Indeed, rehabilitation is counter productive for private enterprise. What they really want to do is keep the individual out of trouble for the period of supervision so they can get paid, and then (fingers crossed), they'll reoffend again so you can get another pay check by supervising them again.

I'm an ex offender myself although its been nearly thirty years since I even had a parking ticket, but I'm quite frightened by whats happening with TR, and indeed by Crisis Graylings ignorance, not only in meeting the needs of the offender, but by creating vast areas where manipulation of the system at the expence of the offender can occur.

As I said above, the ideal goal for private sector supervision would be to hope the offender will reoffend again once they've completed a 'successful' period of supervision.
So, is it beyond the private companies to have arrangements with private landlords (which they would call 'satellite accomodation'), providing a 6 month tenancy for those on supervision to claim a housing outcome, but where the landlord would refuse to extend the tenancy beyond the original 6 months? Homeless again, no supervision or support networks, and the private company rubbing their grubby hands together waiting waiting for that individual walking back through their door for another period of rehabilitation?

Could outsourcing companies be this callous, this manipulative of the system? There seems to me to be plenty of evidence to indicate YES THEY COULD AND WOULD! There are massive faults with this system leaving vulnerable people open to exploitation and abuse. They're not offenders to the private sector they are commodities and stock in every way. If you want a loan for the company against your projected yearly profit you tell the bank manager your company supervises 1200 offenders at x amount per individual so projected profit is y. Human commodities. It's disgusting!

******

Well said - we are already reading how some in CRCs are gaming the system by pressuring for early discharges rather than leaving a supervision order to run its course.

******

With regard to the voluntary and charitable sector, TR brings a fundamental change, that those organisations may, or may not have considered carefully enough. Information from charities working with offenders will have to pass information back to supervising officers. If that information should result in breach proceedures and a return to custody, then the charity involved in providing that information has actively participated in effecting the imprisonment of an individual.

Although it may be all above board and legal, it (for me) fundamentally changes the perceived role and function that charities perform in society. I mean would OXFAM say, be happy if the information they provided on offenders they worked with led to 60 people being imprisoned over a year? I think not. It just dosen't seem to suit what you do.

******

Why would charities for reasons of profit become involved with a government that is actively trying to remove itself from the Human Rights Act? And where do charities stand with TR if the individuals they work with are no longer protected by that HRA?

******

I have heard about one office where a CRC PO Temp is moving on, leaving 50 odd PO cases with no one to transfer them to. Coincidentally, at the same time CRC PSOs are being told they need to start taking on DV cases - something they have not done before.

******

I know CRC offices where Crown Court breaches have not been submitted because to do so would expose the bloody piss poor case management by temps that have exited stage left leaving the newly allocated officers to pick up the pieces.

******

Post split, not enough Assessors and Trainers in either NPS or CRC to train up new recruits. Pre-split, work covered somehow or other by committed L&D professionals. All well and good to announce plans to train new PO's - has someone seriously looked at corporate support needed, especially as CRC VR process creating slimmer structures. Whilst a lot of attention is being focussed on frontline operational staff - just take a look around at the emerging corporate support structures.

******

NPS has suffered badly through not having any corporate support post split.

******

The latest TR travesty in my NPS office (South Yorks) is due to lack of PSOs to cover courts - admin staff have been given temp contracts to fill gaps!! Heaven knows how they will be able to complete reports and assist the Court without training? The experienced and qualified PSOs assigned to the CRC are rightly disgusted! The POs working in court tell us it's a shambles and we feel the reputation of the probation staff is becoming embarrassing!

******

I understand role of SPOs with PQF candidates is to increase - yet a further responsibility! (I'm not a SPO).

******

I'm fed up of management creeps volunteering for everything (covering colleagues on maternity or other understaffed CRC offices) and then moaning they're tired & overworked. Stop propping TR up and you wouldn't be!!

******

I'd say that in West Yorkshire there is an uneasy and risky situation at present. CRC staff are getting very demoralised through caseloads of 90+ for PSOs and approaching 60 for POs (virtually all DV). That is untenable now and they will go under weeks after U12 months cases come on-line. I can't see why any private companies would want to take over as the reputational damage would be immense, they would be out of their depth and it would take an almighty amount of money to try to keep it on the rails. 'Staff mutuals' also wouldn't work because they are in effect management buy outs, and in WY they haven't got a clue about practice (they brought us post sentence assessment for god's sake as a way of making things more efficient. Doh!). 

Meanwhile, NPS has become focussed on prison resettlement and report writing. The system is only operating because a large majority of PSRs are being written sessionally for extra cash by CRC and NPS POs. If the contracts are ever handed out the private companies would soon put a stop to their staff doing them, and then we would be quickly stuffed...... because that's the only thing that's keeping us afloat. NPS are also wanting to put POs into prison, hostel and court teams. All an additional need and cost because of the inefficiency of TR. Yet, there are no staff to move to these teams, and secondly, haven't managers realised that there will soon be cuts to NPS? Risk management is all over the place, inefficiency is increasing due to TR processes, partnerships are down the drain already, AND the financial numbers aren't adding up. 

What a mess. What a government made shambles. What a bloody peculiar and weird design for a Probation Service, never mind one that was previously high performing!! If you were starting from a blank piece of paper, this would have been the last design on the list, suggested by the mad bloke in the corner.


******
Solution in my neck of the woods - Merseyside -  is one of the following: stick everyone on 8 wk reporting; refer everyone to a partnership agency (this means I don't have to see them and the contact counts); revoke everyone; put everyone in a monthly reporting centre. This frees you up to do oasys after oasys all day long zzzz.


******

Similar in my area (north of you). POs transferred back into court teams to do the case allocation and risk escalation/review system, PSOs being made to write majority of court reports (v few full PSRs being done, so no OASys). Staff in wrong locations still due to TR split eg one large office having to put every case (CRC) onto reporting centre because only have one PO. Other CRC offices with PSOs carrying massive case load but one NPS office with PSOs asking for work with only 16 cases each. Managers fighting between themselves as CRC do not want some of the cases allocated to them.

Oh and I agree, the requirement to staff the prisons with POs can't be met unless they take all CRC POs to do the jobs leaving PSOs carrying virtually every CRC case. What really, really worries me are the DV cases sentenced by 5 day reports (FDRs) when enquiries (eg police searches) are not returned in that timescale and yet they are virtually all allocated to CRC.

Then my biggest worry of all SAFEGUARDING, I have heard CDOs say they do not have time to do sufficient enquiries - the scope for something really serious to go wrong is huge, it honestly terrifies me.

What business undertaking due diligence would not immediately drop out of the bidding? It is DANGEROUS, RISKY and reputational damage is the least of prospective deliverers of probation services worries. Victim's families will sue them for every penny when they are responsoble for what is surely coming. STOP, RE-CONSIDER and DROP OUT BIDDERS!

******

Pregnancy rate in our office has gone through the roof. Funny that.

******

In our office all that the PSOs seem to be doing is turning FDRs and Stand Down reports into OASys so-called assessments. I bet the private companies never counted on that - it's the biggest waste of time I have ever seen. And meanwhile nothing is happening with service users. What a pointless effing job.

******

One thing the CRCs can't control is what type of assessment they get from NPS. Our CRC staff are spending huge amounts of time making up the new shortfall in quality of PSRs that don't have OAsys with them - no SDRs any more just FDRs for CRC bound cases. Best of luck bidders - you'd better have deep pockets.

******

I am sure people can add a lot to this list. Just the amount of time trying to read impenetrable emails must add up to millions. I have given up reading them. they are full of meaningless tosh and I will try to hold out for some training on the ridiculous NDelius system (none though coming cos it's f*cked and they know it!).

The greatest cost though is not in the ridiculous additional little and large jobs that have been created, but in the loss of perfectly efficient systems, partnerships, and especially the skills, humour, motivation and dedication of truly excellent staff. The heart is gone, and the lights have gone out.

******

I have a lot of DV cases, some with 'live' Child Protection. I've been told to put them on fortnightly appts!!! Needless to say I refused. 

******

The solution in my CRC is to offer the majority of clients 3 appointments with their officer for the duration of their Order. Aside from this, it's monthly telephone contact and revoke at halfway!

******

In Staffs & West Mids, telephone contact with offenders has gone through the roof, even for DV and on the med/high cusp cases. More worrying, figures are being fudged big time, office visits where offenders have not turned up are being marked down as attended. It's a terrible and very risky situation.

Keep it coming in everyone - I've still got Sunday's blog post to fill. This blog had a staggering 4977 hits yesterday, demonstrating to me that, far from everything 'bedding in nicely', a veritable head of steam is building up with shed loads of trouble just around the corner. Bidders - you were warned!    

58 comments:

  1. That particular Kevin needs to withdraw his person from the arse of whoever belongs to the that arse in the MoJ. Granted, this may be a difficult task, as he needs to avoid the boots of those who went before him...patronizing twat.

    I've been absent for a while, thought I would take a break from feeling so terribly negative about things, but there you go, there is always some bright spark, trying to convince others,. that everything is fine - it's not and Kevin, you are seriously deluded; especially if you think that list of achievements through the summer is anything to shout about...with the exception of the Attendance Centers. it was all, already in place for you; and as someone in the NPS, please save your efforts and don't support the NPS in becoming independent from you - as far as I can see, the NPS on the shop floor, broke away many months ago.

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  2. 'We Need To Talk About Kevin' springs to mind - that little psychopath who added to the misery in the world. The so-called achievements are indeed modest enough to be risible. Frontline staff chalk up more achievements before lunchtime on a typical day. But I am sure Kevin doesn't give a toss. Blowing their trumpets is de rigueur for the CRCs as they compete to outshine and out soundbite each other in the new market place.

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  3. oh yes - my experience of him in Nbria was that he was a clone of CG, in looks and attitude, as he coldly but rarely walked the corridors of us lowly plebs. Smooth, but aloof and unapproachable, I never once saw him smile. He had been there a while before we saw him in our team, and when he did make an appearance to visit the team manager, he made little attempt to chat to anyone else. Indeed he passed me with a stare as I came out of my office. In 3 years, I think I spoke to him once. A powerful ambitious figure, one you didn't dare disagree with, unlike approachable earlier ACO's and ACPO's, who you could turn to for support at any time, just by picking up the phone. Any criticism of me was passed on via the team manager, and there was never praise, even when I did do something well. But then, he had spent several years in NOMS, in a consultancy role in the Performance and Improvement Unit (demonstrating how to improve performance, as his blurb says). Amazing when he had a background of a CQSW qualified PO, where you would expect a bit more warmth and humanity. He sat in a corner at an office lunch for an officer who was leaving and I never saw him smile, or even speak to anyone, even the one who was leaving, and then slithered out, unnoticed. DON'T LET THIS BE THE FUTURE!

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    1. I was that retiring officer- (See my somewhat tongue in cheek Comment on 11/10 -2235- 'the tide has turned'.) Truly scary. Those at the top who are preaching a gospel of untruths, know the truth and therefore are dangerous people, not fit for purpose (other than the purpose being to make luverly money), If they don't know the truth, then they are even more dangerous, living in a parallel fantasy world of their own; like the tiny Wizard of Oz -hidden behind a big screen and a loud haler...

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    2. Anon 22:35 11/10/14

      "I am cautiously optimistic by the comments above although the proof of the pudding etc etc. I am not a NAPO member but am prepared to provide monthly support to a fighting fund as long as there is a legal opposition to TR. We have nothing to lose."

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    3. I see Joe Kuipers is tweeting on subject of a fighting fund or as he calls it "Probation Reunification Fund". I'm in!

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    4. Count me in, from Manchester, TR needs to stop. I hope Napo goes ahead with JR, I couldn't stand working like this any more.

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  4. This CEO has "form" and could be viewed as a bogeyman for the pro TR side of the battle - that is what we expect and there are several more around the country who either through rapid promotion or "right place - right time" are heading up CRC.
    Remember though we have ex chiefs who have said nothing/ little throughout - taken pay off of nearly 1/4 £million and then go on to speak at the union annual junket !
    Be careful labeling the "deserving" leaders !

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    1. A good reality check on leaders who pop up after the firefight.

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  5. I for one am delighted to hear that "Kev" managed to complete his DIY tasks whilst Rome burns...more comedic CEO & similar drivel please .

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  6. Post share sale there'll be far more Kevins then required. They'll have done the job. Any surplus to basic requirements will be out the door with a thankyou very much hope it all works out for you in the future Kev.

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  7. I can't help but contrast all this to the obituary of former Middlesex CPO Thomas Burke. I wonder what will be said of the current bunch?

    Former colleagues recall the encouragement Tom gave to their own professional development, the warmth of his interest in their welfare and his pleasure in their achievements. One noted: "He was never a politician even if it could have made things easier for him and I shall always treasure his integrity and his lack of guile."

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    1. Yes - I thought exactly the same when I read it Jim.

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    2. When I was a trainee I did a placement in one of the Middlesex offices.Tom made himself known to me as he wanted to see how I was getting on.When I said I was struggling with a piece of work for college he raided the Head Office library and sent a pale of helpful books for me to use.We will not see his like again..Anon ex SPO

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  8. Im not sure about the use of kevin's in this discussion. Surely should be kevin as above.
    Pissed off kevin North West..not the one you are talking about above

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  9. To anon 13; 25 Kevin-I think that's an entirely fair comment you've made there!

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  10. In the midlands area they are warning about posting anything that will put probation/sell off in a bad light.

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    1. What? Like the Target Operating Model?

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    2. PUT!!! It's firmly there already, with a big bow tie made of solid shit!

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  11. WE need to talk about Kevin, lmao. What an absolute crock of shit. Do u really think that is going to motivate your staff?

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  12. Target Operating Model!!!! Oh yeh......has anyone told the bidders that TOM failed some time ago and now we're just making it up as we go along. Certainly our IT departments are. They're working with an entire crock of shite. Unstable and dangerous, that's where we are at.

    One thing I do like about the current situation is that it has set us back to twenty years or so ago, when everyone just did their own thing. Working it out as we go along. I'm sure there was some theoretical underpinning back then, whereas now it's just a means of muddling through.

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    1. anon 19.13 - we didn't think it up as we went!, I started 20 yrs ago,and it was so organised and thorough - you couldn't have a high risk offender, or resettlement case for 12 months, or lifer for 2 yrs. There were excellent staff sex offender courses -standard or extended, and then you had to shadow an experienced PO; you'd interview a PSR DV case with a trained specialist PO; attend Court training for 7 days. Detailed contact notes were handwritten- typed by admin. Some oldies might remember Pt A's, B's and C's; A- background précis, B - quarterly supervision plan, C -contacts. Info was easy to access on file. We made reg prison visits, wrote them reg letters, stayed in touch with families, did preventative work in community,sat on neighbourhood action panels, visited youth clubs to discuss our role,had monthly court liaison meetings in teams;gave charities lists of vulnerable families at Christmas and delivered pressies; applied for money from befriending fund; transported clients to meetings or activities we'd arranged. shopped with them to ensure they bought what was needed; took and collected families at NEPACS caravans. PSR's were checked by other PO's before sending, often with amendments until perfect. (I have been known to cry with frustration when I thought I knew best but though I say it myself, I became a damn good officer.) And there's more -we'd do home visits for every PSR, to check accuracy; and they would require 2 interviews, to take details,and one to check it with them after. When training, we got Probation handbooks about processes/ policies which guided me through whole of my training. We were trained to assist in running groupwork programmes, and we made frequent home visits, often impromptu. We checked accuracy of given addresses, and supervision appointments were usually from half an hour up to 2 hours; we worked with people in hostels, alongside hostel worker; used flipcharts to encourage offenders to address behaviour and supervised volunteers who'd befriend and support more vulnerable offenders.We had Nat Standards so drilled into us I could chant them. And, we had to know every Crim Justice or Social Services Act, We had the Social Services handbook, and I could quote every Sch 1 offence, some very strange. We worked with yp's from age of 14 -demanding though often petty offending, until pilot in 1997 for YOS. We worked with parents and schools and would attend their meetings. Case loads were from 30 to 50, but we were still expected to produce about 3 PSR's a week, And take clients to first groupwork programme, sit with them through introduction, and attend at end, to celebrate success. But that was all before computers. And targets were not rammed down our throats. We didn't have to obey computers, but we did develop initiative through our hands- on managers. And it WAS very satisfying, and I know what you mean, we had more lee way. Just thought I would give you a pic of days long gone, of 'advise, assist and befriend'., when you'd pop in on someone who was giving you cause for concern, on way home (health and safety wasn't high on agenda those days) but on the whole, we were respected. (I once got card and chocs from client's partner.The card just said -' thank you for listening'- I felt quite weepy, as she was not the client, I just took time to enable her to get her head together) You know exactly what I mean Jim, as you sit sobbing with nostalgia. -aaah - the good old days.. who'd a thought it now..(the retired PO)

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  13. I have had the following via direct messages on Twitter - I will answer no questions about my informant: -

    " in confidence - seen a prime contract doc today re: mobilisation plans 4 TR & states expected date for contract award is 17th Nov!!

    If NAPO don't launch JR very soon they will miss the boat as grayling wants prime contractors to be notified in weeks! "

    Presumably this does not just apply to the CRC my informant knows about - so hopefully there will be confirmation(s) from other sources?

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    1. today I heard that preferred bidders will be announced 28th Oct. ( I also know bidders have said it'll be the end of Oct). Therefore, I think the 17th Nov for contract award is too soon. My understanding is that bidders have not had a full picture of the areas they are bidding for - I think for business sensitivity purposes some information has been withheld. (I maybe wrong of course).

      To be offered a contract on 28th Oct and have it confirmed on 17th Nov doesn't give much time for the preferred bidder to look at their bid and have a 'cooling off period'. Grayling is really getting desperate.

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    2. Now from Harry Fletcher via Twitter: -

      1. " Harry Fletcher @hfletcher10 · 28 minutes ago

      #Probationselloff Primes to be notified in 3 weeks if won contracts then signed off 2 weeks later. If JR a runner it must be filed urgently."

      2. " Harry Fletcher @hfletcher10 · 8m 8 minutes ago

      #Probationselloff Successful bidders to learn in 3 weeks if won contracts, sign off 2 weeks later. So just 5 weeks left to save Probation! "

      Seems as if the barman has his hand on the doors of 'The Last Chance Saloon', just waiting for the late drinkers to file out - before he closes them shut - and then all that will be left is Parliament - collapse of TR - or no bidders - can you think of anything else that might just stop the final nails going in the coffin of locally public unified probation?

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    3. this is deliberate to outwit NAPO and prevent JR, everything has been brought forward, blog and twitter being closely monitored

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    4. The MoJ have been closely monitoring this blog for ages - why I write it with them in mind lol. This has been a propaganda war from the beginning as much as anything. It just means we have to get galvanised and, like all good films, build to a cliff-hanging climax!

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    5. I cannot help but wonder why bidders cannot see that the used car salesman wants the dog off his lot before the wheels fall off completely. Wouldn't touch it with a bargepole.

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    6. " like all good films, build to a cliff-hanging climax! " I think The Lone Ranger, Cheyenne and Mr Dillon are all too far past it to save us, no matter how fast Lassie runs to report we are hanging by a breaking thread over the cliff!


      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zaZh7yV7-8E


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    7. good to see in the face of adversity we've still got a sense of humour. We are down but definitely not out.

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    8. Worryingly, the bidders presumably think they can still make money, and with the track record of civil service procurement - particularly the contract clowns in the MoJ - who can blame them?

      Of course, any profit will come with a huge reputational damage, so what price the good PR of taking a good look and deciding, nah, cheers anyway Crisis Chris, we'll leave it? Still the best option in my book...

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    9. I have a feeling that the staff will be of a greater problem than the damage caused by the offenders. There will not be a dodgy email, unscrupulous written instruction or mendacious act that will not get faxed to the local press!! Once the new owners have handed back the contracts I very much doubt there will be a queue of new buyers.

      Either way we win :)

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    10. There are no winners here. I predict tears across the piece.

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  14. The Wrong Kevin? (to be read in the style of Alan Bennett) - I work for the CRC where Kevin is the CEO and after reading all of those terrible things about him I think I need a sit down, a slice of seed cake and a cup of hot sweet tea. It makes me feel quite queasy to imagine that that man in the dark suit could be so horrid. He always has something to say, doesn't seem to forget anyone and likes a nice welcome. And he always looks so pleased with everything, even when he was telling us he didn't care much for Mr Grayling's plans. I quite like the stronger man, but I do sometimes wonder if there's a bit of a rough lad lurking in the shadows. CQSW someone said? Well, you wouldn't have had him as a bit of a 'social worker' now, would you? Mopping brows and making a brew, not this one. They must have the wrong Kevin, surely they must.

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  15. Radio 4 tells a tale of Staffodshire CCG privatising cancer and all end of life care to several primes including Serco and Virgin Health. The master plan seems to be everywhere. Got in touch will TV man but as yet he's not got back to me, perhaps its because I work in a prison and he wants only field team evidence. I'm gonna squeal like a pig.

    papa

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    1. I presume you mean Ch 4's Simon I? He is extremely busy but he does get back to you - He has phoned me several times in last week, wanting evidence. I think he will listen to all evidence, selecting what he needs, whether field team, prison or wherever. I will send him an email, and so could you - do you have his address? Keep squealing - spesh to him!

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  16. Let me assure you, we haven't got the wrong Kevin I watched this total bully of a man attend a team meeting and attempt to belittle and humiliate a young, fairly newly qualified PO because of his size. I feel happy that N'bria got shot of him but send Cumbria and Lancs CRR my deepest condolences.

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  17. have you seen the most recent comments on Probation Twitter today from Eve Chester, AGM endorsing JR ?- I clicked onto the NAPO/org/uk/ blogs-agm endorses the JR strategy (in her tweet,) and there is a report/thank you from Ian,saying loads of evidence from PO's, passed on to lawyers. **With Harry's more sobering announcement 11 min ago, as I typed the above, signed over Nov, semi-op Feb, fully op April.

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    1. Fully op in name only - we haven't had the impact of the TTG changes yet, let alone the shambles that will follow when all and sundry turn up on the doorstep and expect a 'service'

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    2. To anon 21:06 from Eve I struggle with copy snd pasting on phone but here is link to Ian's latest blog https://www.napo.org.uk/blogs/agm-endorses-jr-strategy I'd imagine its still worth sending in case material if it fits the criteria but speed clearly an issue.

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  18. I meant fully op- April '16!

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  19. Our Probation Service is due to be sold in 5 weeks yesterday. Providers have been told to mobilise in 1 week, will be told in 2 weeks who has won the contract but will not be allowed to make it public. On 17 Nov it will then be for e.g. Sodexo Probation. On 1 Feb they will take over sole responsibility and from that date they have until April 2016 to implement TOM. They have obviously reacted to the JR and have moved the contracts forward before any provider is ready. The MOJ's lawyers can ask to expedite the JR as a spoiling exercise and the lapse between the 2 hearings can be very short. The only person who has actually handled a JR in Napo has told me all this, so knows what he's talking about. We need to get everyone who can to give evidence asap and the lawyers have about one week to get this JR in. There is no message from Napo but they need to let the members know and we need to keep the pressure up.

    I have been thinking about different ways of publicising this now and we need to tweet to everyone, keep retweeting this info (as noted above, Harry has given us the facts in tweets) and does anyone know anyone famous to get them behind us? I thought of Russell Brand, Stephen Fry and will continue to try and get in touch constantly. This kind of behaviour will not stop us but we need to impress on Napo the urgency.

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    1. When not trying to be an arse, Mr Brand is actually quite a conservative (with a small c) and principled individual. If you can get him on board then this would be quite a feather in your cap!

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    2. Interesting to see whether Brennan accepts that these expidited timescales are not dangerous. And what will Kahn say in the House and in the media? This is political skullduggery of the most extreme kind.

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    3. Will go on twitter

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    4. Khan will accept it, as he has accepted the whole TR concept. Brennan won't upset her Minister. It will be pushed through regardless, as with anything and everything this half-arsed bunch are allowed to play with. Want to capture some votes? Give the electorate a jingoistic victory (Scottish referendum was easier on the bodycount than Falklands) and a cash 'windfall' (help yourself to your own pension pot) and you can do whatever you wish!!

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  20. I just hope that when NAPO launch their JR they make sure it gets plenty of Press attention. Tanya, take note!!

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    1. NAPO take note , this is what happens when the membership gets it's MOJO back !
      Grayling is running scared and any threat to bring the share sale forward from the "end of 2014" must be for a reason.
      We won't know if it is because of the JR plan but there is some coincidence if not.........

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  21. This just on twitter from Dean Rogers...@deanrogers25: @NapoMcr think confusion arising from rumour of slip in preferred bidder naming. Was due 22/10 now Nov. Bidders nervous. Signoff c23Dec

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  22. Sign off Christmas Day!! Grayling dressed as Santa coming down each bidders chimney with a CRC to stuff in their stocking. This tragedy is getting funnier by the minute. What a bunch of shysters.

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  23. It's getting riskier by the minute . I am apalled by That Man's lack of concern for staff and public safety and his disregard for our client group.

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  24. The winners of the bids already know they've won. They're already hiring staff. The timetables are not changing due to JR possibility. The MOJ is not at all concerned by that. Timetables had already changed due to external factors.

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  25. Anon 23:06 how do you know who the winning bidders are slready?!

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    1. i think Anon 23.06 is old CG himself...shades of Hitler in his bunker having to do everything himself, even the propaganda! :)

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  26. The winning bidders are already recruiting. Two people I know have been offered jobs. It is common knowledge in some areas especially where third sector providers have been told and started expanding their mentoring staff.

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    1. Oh good, I'm glad that Chris 'I see no crisis' Grayling's one-size-fits-all, mentors-for-everyone solution to re-offending has been picked up by the bidders. I was worried that he'd been too subtle in his constant repetition of the idea.

      Have they said when they expect their first delivery of magic wands (for the provision of jobs and houses)?

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    2. The same day they get the fairy dust that turns mice into mentors and the magic beans that provides charities to signpost the offender population to.

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    3. Who are the winning bidders? I know St Giles are recruiting

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