Friday, 27 March 2015

The Axe Revealed

Yet another aspect of TR reality was revealed yesterday with the following email to all staff in Cumbria and Lancashire CRC:-
  
Dear Colleague

I know you have been waiting patiently for information about the staffing figures and whilst I cannot at this stage give you detailed information on the structures and locations, I can give you the high level staffing numbers.

We currently have an establishment of 340 full time equivalent staff (which includes agency and fixed term contract staff) within Cumbria and Lancashire and we will need to move to the full time equivalent of 217 by the Autumn. This is a reduction of 123 full time equivalents. The numbers we need to move to are outlined below and are still subject to changes.

Job Area  Existing Numbers  Numbers we need to move to


Case Admin 57 - 30
Probation Services Officers 88 - 71
Probation Officers 56 - 31
Middle Managers 19 - 9
Senior Managers 9 - 5
Corporate Services 60 - 16
Unpaid Work 28 - 29
Programmes 23 - 26

TOTAL 340 - 217

(24 people are on secondment, these are heavily weighted to PSO in Achieve)

I am also hoping to be able to share with you information from Sodexo which will include details on redundancies. I know we have agreed that Friday isn't a good day to send communication but if the information is available tomorrow I will send it to you.

I know many of you will have a lot of questions about what this means for you and the next steps and ideally I would like speak to you face to face, but felt it important to get the information to you as quickly as possible as I know some of you will be taking leave over the Easter holidays.

We will, however, be holding 90 minute briefings for all operational staff on Monday 13 April (am) and a Corporate Service staff briefing on the 2nd April (am) and we will let you have details of locations as soon as we can. Please keep the date free in your diary.

In the meantime, if you have questions you can e-mail me at CL_askthechief or you can speak with your line manager or an ACE. If you are on maternity or sick leave please contact Sue Hall, HR Manager.

Regards

Penny

Penny Barker
Chief Executive
Cumbria and Lancashire Community Rehabilitation Company (CL CRC)
99-101 Garstang Road
Preston PR1 1LD


Hardly surprising, but nevertheless devastating news for many loyal and hardworking professionals, Sodexo is first to show its hand and demonstrate beyond doubt that despite all the bollocks and fine words, in order to make profit out of probation, jobs have to go. 

I was particularly struck by this comment left last night:-
I wish I could have an honest chat with one of those ex-probation chief officers that sold us out as THEY KNOW exactly what's coming. There's a bunch of them on Twitter tweeting about their new lives after probation and with massive redundancy packages we'll never get. I'd suggest any Twitter users ask them a few questions. 
If there was ever a key time for Napo to speak up it is now. But then this is the same Napo that sold us down the river and gave away our Judicial Review.
At a time like this I'm also reminded of the whoops of joy and celebrations reported within the McDowell household when news of the contract award broke. It all leaves a very bitter taste in the mouth indeed. 

I also can't help noticing it's Friday and I suspect we're due a blog from Napo General Secretary Ian Lawrence. Lets hope it might actually say something of substance and there's some indication he might be worth his salary. 

Lets all be supportive of each other, share information and as the election campaign gets into full swing, at every opportunity make life difficult for those Lib Dem and Tory bastards that were responsible for destroying a well-performing public service in the first place.

148 comments:

  1. jim - Thank you for your blog, for making it possible to get the reality of this shit sandwich into the public domain, to allow colleagues to share how they feel. I have an image of you spinning like a dervish, incandescent with rage as yesterday's news broke. It is at times like this that I hope you feel the personal commitment & drain on your resources is justified. I very much appreciate it as an invaluable opportunity to "sound off", to find balance through reading others' views and to get a sense that I'm not isolated in feeling torn open by the obscenity that is TR & the policies & politics associated with TR.

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    1. Agreed.

      I also think the CEO of Lancashire & Cumbria CRC - (whatever its fancydancy acronym name is) has done the decent thing in being apparently the first CRC Employer to get the details of the basic staffing information to the staff.

      I just hope none were surprised - it is precisely what was long ago predicted.

      I will repeat a link to a blog I have given several times from an insider privateer who told us and the the House of Commons how it would be back in June 2013. Richard Johnson also engaged with me in the comment section of his own blog and might still do so if folk want to test his ideas further.

      I am on the outside looking in - I expect there are likely to be several probation announcements in coming weeks that will be smothered in the media by the political news around the dissolution of parliament and the further cranking up of the general election campaign.

      Labour still are very quiet on firm commitments, I am particularly interested in the consequences from a CJS point of view AND for NPS and CRC employees/Napo members point of view of their plan to treat all under twenty ones as young offenders as far as (I presume) the youth courts are concerned.

      Sadiq Khan, who made the policy statement, seems a very strong candidate to be Labour's mayor of London nominee, so if he does become that he is unlikely to also be Labour Party's Justice lead person in the next parliament. Maybe it would be worth inviting him or one of his team to do a guest blog. I would be particularly interested to hear from the Labour MP who seems the current lead on probation, ex prison worker, Jenny Chapman from Darlington, as an alternative to Sadiq Khan.

      http://buyingqp.com/2013/06/17/spend-to-offend-the-outsourcing-of-probation/

      Delete
    2. I'm in Cumbria and Lancs CRC and I do actually believe Penny has the best intentions in her approach. She won't stay long. I have faith in her morality.

      Delete
  2. Whilst the detail is missing, similar numbers have been mentioned across the six Sodexo CRCs. Many careers are going to end with betrayal and hundreds and thousands of years of experience lost to the service. It will be replaced with a shallow pretence and embarrassing ineptitude. I am done with this.

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  3. Thanks to Jim for keeping us updated. I am totally in shock at the numbers that they intend to reduce us by. I have given 11 years of my life to this company. Been through ups and downs and it was the love of the job that kept me here. Mangers have stepped on me and tossed me to one side, but yet I worked through it all, again for the love of the job. I am unsure of what I would do next. Totally shocked.

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    1. I think middle management in Cumbria and Lancs CRC have been in the dark as much as us. They attended a briefing on the morning that the email came out. They've not actually been told anything more than we have. Based on a conversation I had with my area's senior manager a few weeks ago - I don't think they realised just how deep the cuts were going to be either. I remember my ACO saying that the agency staff would cover the excess numbers. Well, the numbers above do not even taken account of agency numbers. This is on top of losing agency staff. I think Sodexo have kept this very closely under wraps and then let it rain like a massive shower of shit.

      Delete
    2. To cut 36% of posts over six months is shockingly deep and rapid destruction anywhere. My heart goes out to all my former friends and colleagues still employed by NPS/CRCs after the election.

      And quite apart from the nightmare of struggling to deliver any kind of service in these circumstances, permanent staff in Cumbria and Lancs must have been quite needlessly tortured by this memo, which did not even tell them how many of the 123 posts disappearing are currently filled by agency/temporary staff. And so they cannot even guess at their personal risk of being made compulsorily redundant by autumn. Does anyone reading this from Cumbria/Lancs know the figures for non-permanent staff and feel able to share them?

      Delete
    3. The non-permanents were not included in the stats presented. We will lose them AND the numbers quoted above.

      Delete
    4. What? Are you sure? Bad enough already but the chief's letter clearly stated the non permanents WERE included in these figures. She wrote above: "We currently have an establishment of 340 full time equivalent staff (which includes agency and fixed term contract staff) within Cumbria and Lancashire and we will need to move to the full time equivalent of 217 by the Autumn." I can only hope this is the slightly less dreadful truth, still devastating for all staff, whether temp or permanent and for the communities they serve.

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  4. I have met a number of Sodexo people. I am deeply concerned at their naïveté around the challenges of this client group. They all want to wear their offender facing credentials like a badge of honour but present as self interested and duplicitous.

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  5. Harsh realities....when Sodexo took over HMP Northumberland the staff reductions were around 30% so I guess we could all see what was coming. This does appear to be the base line reduction so I assume the MOJ/NOMS were always fully aware when bids were submitted that this would happen. I guess we can expect to see this figure replicated now with more announcements due.We all should be aware that those who demand our loyalty now to see this through are the very architects of our pain and the demise of our service and careers. Do they deserve our loyalty?
    They have known; that is what the excess EVR fund that was not used to date was intended for all along. But they needed us this far and now 30% of us are dispensable because they are were they needed to be and yes, we did it for them. So do the maths if you want to know how many of us will go - it is whatever numbers match the figures left in the EVR fund. It has been there hidden in plain sight.
    A PO

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    1. I was just going to comment on Sodoxos involvement with HMP Northumberland because I think its important to remember what happened.
      Not understanding the complex nature of the job they cut to deep to quickly, and left the prison almost unable to function. They received much critisism too.
      With that in mind, and the speed at which they have now moved to cut staffing levels in probation I don't think that just providing numbers should be enough.
      They should also now be forced to publish details as to why they've reached those numbers, and what the operational model will be for the staffing levels that remain.
      Only then can they demonstrate that they have some understanding of the nature of probation work and its complexities.
      They need to be made to evidence that they've learned from their mistakes from HMP Northumberland, and NAPO need to be the forerunners in demanding that evidence.

      Delete
    2. anony 8:16 I think you are spot on with your questions, I believe that there will be more briefings and believe me I have noted down your questions and will ask them, if they are making me redundant I will not go down without a fight.

      Delete
    3. Posted on behalf of a third party:-

      In response to 8:16

      "They need to be made to evidence that they've learned from their mistakes from HMP Northumberland, and NAPO need to be the forerunners in demanding that evidence."

      What you say is logical - HOWEVER the response will be "COMMERCIALLY SENSITIVE" (The Computer very definitely says NO). There will be no public scrutiny and absolutely no accountability from SODEXO et al.

      AND NAPO - I am speechless in my anger - they knew this was the inevitable outcome. Why are they not shouting from the roof tops???????

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    4. I have seen a copy of the bid operational model and it's colour coded (offenders become blue, green, red or yellow) and this is determined by 1. risk of harm 2. risk of offending and 3. closeness to change. Every single client has to undertake a two hour New Directions group at the start of their order and they allocated a number of 'intervention hours' depending on the three factors above. Someone who is highly close to change, med risk and high offending is 'red' and gets allocated 33 face to face hours. At the back end of every order there is a motivational tool of 'kiosk reporting' so that we don't have to see them and interrupt our working hours. The low risk, low harm band gets just 12 hours. All clients are on weekly reporting for twelve weeks and then monthly.

      Delete
  6. It is nearer 41% in our area. Temps and agency staff first to go but I don't see that as anything defensible. It is not as if those temps and agency staff were sitting around doing nothing. The innovations do not look safe, are certainly untested and the proposed operating models leak like a sieve.

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    1. What area are you in anon 08:07? Is it also Sodexo?

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    2. Yes, Sodexo

      Delete
  7. I am a principled person and have often been accused of cutting my nose to spite my face and on occasion it's made me unpopular. My point is to anyone who is walking up angry this morning and thinking of going on long term sick or even just handing your notice in DONT. Sit is out let them make people redundant and then hand your notice in and leave them in the shit. We will have the last laugh !!

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    Replies
    1. That doesn't sound very sensible to me.

      Delete
  8. Anon 08:41 this is absolutely not the thing to do and will result in losing entitlement to redundancy pay as well as having a resignation on your CV that will cause a potential new employer to question your rational thought processes. An employer wanting to save money would make that suggestion ( ie resignation). There may be many legal issues looming now which could end up in Employment Tribunals eg selection process for the TR split, discrimination issues, selection process for redundancy etc. Time to get engaged with your reps...
    A PO

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    1. maybe I wasn't clear enough - im saying if you feel like walking away don't. wait until all the redundancies have gone through and people left and if you're one of the unlucky ones still with a job then resign. sodexo will be in the brown stuff then and the wheels will well and truly fall off.

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    2. People are fighting for their jobs, why if the are successful would they then put all on the line. Personally if I lose my job I lose everything cars, holidays, house the lot. Why if I kept my job would I do what you are suggesting. Crazy, life is to short to be so self destructive.

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    3. We need to remember that everyone has different personal circumstances and not make sweeping grand statements. My children are grown up, I live in rented accommodation and I don't have a car. For me redundancy is a big kick up the bum to get out of this horribly stressful job with a little bit of cash behind me. I'm all too well aware this isn't the same for everyone. Other people in my position might be feeling pressurised to move on to let colleagues with families and bigger commitments keep the jobs left. It's not straightforward and will set colleagues against each other. The only certainty is that there is more shit to come.

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    4. just have care in discussing colleagues positions...last time redundancy was mooted a colleague with whom I shared an office said to me" you clearly have enough money, if you care so much why don't you just leave?". I have never been able to forget that. I did not have enough money but why should I have to tell her that? This will all start again...

      Delete
  9. I am sorry to say that anyone wanting to hear "shouting from the rooftops" will be sadly disappointed.
    The General Election has started and Parliament dissolved ....you will hear no sense until early May ( assuming a single party wins, otherwise there could be weeks of horsetrading).
    The privateers have timed the announcement to perfection , a sign of their skills in everything but probation.
    This shit for brains government has sold us all down the river . They have no scruples, they tried to introduce two very sneaky parliamentary procedures regarding the Speaker and European migration ( i think) in recent weeks but have ridden roughshod over the electorate for FIVE years.
    There is only one way to rid ourselves of the grinning viper that is Grayling and Cameron the weasel - and that is at the ballot box.
    We are not blessed with any outstanding alternatives but I would not expect any probation person to be voting to a Tory government.
    Unfortunately many of the changes to staffing will already be actioned before any governement will see the new landscape, and that will be too late.
    Probation staff have been used as a political football for many years and the utter contempt shown in destroying a successful service by this government will be a milestone for decades to come.

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  10. I've just looked up the MOJs document published last year regarding voluntary redundancy (pdf and can't post it from my phone), but it raises serious (alarming) concerns in my mind.
    Voluntary redundancy remains open to all until (and this is my concern) 31st of March 2015!
    Why have these cuts been announced only days before that date?
    Is there some legal loophole being exploited where major differences can occur between those that have "APPLIED" for VR, and those that haven't and will face "COMPULSORY" redundancy?
    I find the timing of this news (with a weekend in between) very disturbing.
    Does anybody know anything that may clarify my concerns?

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    1. In my crc we've been told already that we will get a max of 1.5 weeks a year redundancy, that is if you are over 40. Under 40 you get a week.

      So it really grates that all those in the ivory towers are sending out goodbye emails to one and all having snapped up the enhanced package of at least 4 weeks a year. ...

      SUDEXO know what they are doing with their £.

      Delete
  11. CRC MANCHESTER AND CHESHIRE27 March 2015 at 09:31

    Rumours are running rife in MANCHESTER CRC. People are talking about massive cuts to follow Sodexo announcement. I went o see my manager this morning after reading the blog and she would not even give me a proper answer, accept for saying that she was worried about her own position. Now that says it all about management. Don't give a shit about staff but just worried about their own fing position.

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    1. Managers will tell you nothing, I have learned that over the years with probation. They will keep you sweet right up to the end then toss you away.

      Delete
    2. Have read the blog, so so sad, feels like titanic, I feel guilty for being 'saved' in nps whilst watching others literally drown its disgusting. I need to get out, feel like Judas working for the enemy. Napo r like spitting image puppets sitting in the gallery watching events unfold but not leaving the chair, its definitely all over im afraid. Let the vultures and dogs have what's left.

      Delete
    3. It was ever thus particularly for many, perhaps most very senior managers ACPO/ACO and above, they only sustained their own jobs on the basis of the face to face front-line week that others did. There were some ACPO's I knew who held a few cases, does that still apply to any current senior probation managers?

      Hence I have challenged some via Twitter, before and after the split to simply resign - and I think there are at least some who made honourable decisions a while back and did not seek jobs in NPS or NOMs or a CRC but understandably took the payoffs (presumably part of the deal being confidentiality) they could get and moved on. To them I say, well done, but it would have been better if they had spoken out.

      I remember when electric monitoring was first promulgated in the mid 80s and probation folk commented publicly. The then CPO in Essex made some grand statements about my staff will not be involved in tagging, which I found a little comforting. In fact it took government a long time to get it going and in the end did not use Probation Services, as the 'vehicle' as far as the contracting. In any event that CPO had long left probation - he moved on to become CEO of a national charity so when probation staff did become involved, it was not his concern!

      Delete
    4. Whoops - I should have referenced my reply at 11:05 to be a response to Anon at 09:37.

      Delete
    5. INTERSERVE’S chairman Lord Norman Blackwell believes that probation’s future is bright.

      The company’s board enjoyed a day-long tour of initiatives run by the Cheshire & Greater Manchester Community Rehabilitation Company.

      Lord Blackwell was head of the Number 10 policy unit from 1995 to 1997, where he developed a keen interest in the criminal justice system.

      The Conservative peer, who has also held a number of senior positions in banking and insurance, said: “My view is that the way in which probation is delivered is the best that it has ever been. The emphasis on reducing re-offending is working.

      “I developed a keen interest in public policy during my time at Number 10 and realised that many of the social problems the country is faced with come down to a few common themes: housing, education, skills and employment.

      “If we, together with our partner agencies, can play our role in solving these problems, then we can support offenders to be productive members of the community and be a fully functional citizens.”

      Lord Blackwell visited one of CGM CRC’s Intensive Community Order teams, and met with staff and offenders.

      He added: “It was good to see the offenders’ commitment and the hard work being done by colleagues to support their rehabilitation. I saw real progress, in terms of agencies working together to actually understand and address the needs of the offenders. Rather than breaking the service down into separate elements, such as punishment and welfare, everything takes place under one roof.

      “For the board and for me, as chairman, it was really exciting to see what’s being done on the ground and how impressed we are by the skills and commitment of the people working in the CRCs.”

      Delete
    6. I am a manager and regard your post as both ill mannered and ill informed. Do you make such rash statements in relation to the cases you supervise? Incidentally, I think you mean «except» instead of «accept». I assume you know the difference between the two.

      Delete
    7. What a snotty reply. And by concentrating on the spelling, you've demonstrated brilliantly that some managers don't know where the real priorities lie.

      (and yes, I split the infinitive deliberately)

      Delete
    8. Dear Ms, Mrs or Mr Manager @ 17:29 - Perspective Please

      On a day like today, with up to 40% of staff facing compulsory redundancy which has been carefully and strategically planned jointly by MoJ/NOMS/Trust managements/CRC bidders, then some bile & vitriol will inevitably be directed at management who may or may not have been involved in this obscene debacle.

      Here's a thought - why not put your hi-falutin' sensibilities to one side for one night of the year & let those who are distressed & facing life-changing effects vent how they feel, spelling words however they choose as they furiously type out their rage.

      You may be equally affected? You may or may not be suffering the same anxieties, fears or distress? But wind it in for one night, eh?

      A moment of "ill manners" might cause you a bit of dyspepsia, but the consequences of the immoral shitstorm, duplicitous conspiracy & political scandal that is TR is a bit more painful for most.

      Delete
    9. Anony 17:29. Typical comment from a manager, mind that is what I would expect from managers. I bet you are on the list to go and with comments like that I hope you are at the top. Why don't you grow a pair and act like a human for once in your life.

      Delete
    10. This is odd, I work in Manchester and only yesterday in a meeting we were told that some of us may be asked to work in Cheshire as they only have one PO due to all the PO's being off sick and a couple resigning. Its odd one day we are told we are short staffed then the next we are told that there maybe massive cuts.

      Delete
    11. Sorry response at 21.08 should have been a lot further up. But to add to Ian Lawrence has everyone forgotten how he gave up JR, he is hopeless and should go. He is not to be trusted and spineless.

      Delete
    12. Anonymous 17:29 Two words for you 'piss off'. I would just love to be supervised by you, you know why because on one nice sunny day i would walk into your office and tell you were you can shove it.


      Delete
  12. to anon 11:01 "saved" in NPS???? Are you kidding??? Massive cuts to follow if Tories get back in - they have already said so and much of it at MOJ, now how does that make us "safe"??? There is a massive restructuring exercise under way only they haven't quite finalised the details.....I do not feel safe in NPS, very far from it. We really are all in this together the only difference may be a few months.....SOLIDARITY

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    1. Although there is some sort of benchmarking exercise on the horizon, it is extremely unlikely that there will be any compulsory redundancies.

      Delete
    2. no, the cuts are planned I'm afraid.....all it takes is a Tory win and MOJ bears the brunt with probation at greatest risk because prison cuts are now political capital.

      Delete
  13. It seems there have been two Napo Branch Circulars this week that deal with staffing levels.

    Ian Lawrence has now blogged: -

    " They say Sodexo – we say: Oh no!

    https://www.napo.org.uk/blogs/they-say-sodexo-%E2%80%93-we-say-oh-no "

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ian Lawrence - "We now understand that in Cumbria and Lancashire CRC the Chief Executive has announced a reduction of 11% to the current Full Time Equivalent (FTE) staffing profile with plans to reduce the current staffing levels from 340 to 217 by the Autumn."

      My basic maths tells me that 217 is approx 63% of 340. The Penny Barker email refers to the loss of 123 "full time equivalents". That could be more than 123 staff numbers (e.g. 246 half time staff) but is a loss of 37% full time posts. Penny was very clear she is referring to "full time equivalents". Lawrence can't even work that out, and he's a £70k pa General Secretary looking after members' interests? Just when you thought he couldn't be more incompetent...

      Or am I the stupid one?

      Delete
    2. I thought I saw Andrew's posting about the proposed job cuts in Cumbria and Lancs CRC on the NAPO forum but tnere is nothing there now.Puzzled
      Anon ex SPO no 2

      Delete
    3. It is still on the Napo Forum; -

      http://www.napo2.org.uk/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=963

      where I reposted it from : -

      http://probationmatters.blogspot.co.uk/2015/03/the-truth-will-out.html?showComment=1427373035068#c501297349578988210

      Delete
  14. Sadly ... " Saved " as in Peter Shilton. Italia 90 penalty shoot out. Just waiting our turn to face the inevitable !!!!

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  15. Probation Officer27 March 2015 at 11:57

    So Napo knew about this and kept it to itself. No surprises there. Clearly there is no fight in the dog that is Napo, I don't see the point of paying membership fees any longer.

    https://www.napo.org.uk/blogs/they-say-sodexo-–-we-say-oh-no

    The Probation Institute is also very silent, probably because it wants the CRC bosses on side. This shows what crud it is and I hope all members cancel their membership.

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    Replies
    1. Probation Officer on 27 March 2015 at 11:57 wrote: -

      " So Napo knew about this and kept it to itself. No surprises there."

      According to the Gen Secs Blog today two Branch Circulars were issued on 25th March - admittedly I cannot find them anywhere else on the website, but circularising Branches with information is not in my opinion, withholding information.

      PO at 11.57 can ask via her/his branch NEC reps when the information was first available at Chivalry Road and why it was not made more available sooner to all member's, or can save up the question and ask it personally at the next General Meeting.

      I am not on the inside of Napo - it must be very difficult running the organisation these last few years. I recall as a Branch Executive member it was always very difficult to fit in Napo work as well as the day job and I had considerable admiration for most Officers and Officials at Branch and National level, just for the volume of work undertaken, I never had the capacity to offer myself as a National rep or lead branch officer - and would like to see the efforts of those that do, acknowledged and appreciated rather than mostly condemned.

      Delete
    2. Neither of those circulars hit the email boxes of any members I know of

      Delete
  16. Thanks for the info, dont know what I'd do without this blog. Anyone know if we would have amy redress through employment law if we are made redundant. Sifted into crc against my will when there was in effect no job for me.

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  17. I know that in respect of VOLUNTARY redundancies enhanced terms apply for the lifetime of the contracts. But in the event of COMPULSORY redundancies are enhanced terms applicable?

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  18. If the email was sent to Cumbria via CEO, when does the selection process start? Does anyone know what the actual time scales?

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  19. The powers that be will know who they want out, mark my words. They Will try to `manage' staff out than have to pay em.

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    1. really worrying to hear this and will probably be done via capability & disciplinary procedures

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    2. Not something I want to hear, my manager has spent the past 10 years to try and get rid of me, saying things like I was to powerful in the office. More like she hates women working for her.

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    3. She sounds like an off spring of Richard the 3rd !!!

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  20. I think Napo needs to provide some clear explanations about the scenarios and options ahead for the membership. I do not see staff reductions being managed through voluntary redundancies – it's expensive and, anyway, I think the employers will want to make their own selections to create their own workforce mix. I know selection for compulsory redundancy is meant to be objective and fair, but there are ways around these 'obstacles'. The employers will see it as an opportunity to get rid of the dissidents and other undesirables. Napo refers to the Management of Change (MoC) document as though it will force the employers through a process agreed years ago with the Trusts and the Probation Association. I think this is unlikely to be a bulwark against compulsory redundancies. In my view, the MoC document will not give us peace in our time. If I am wildly off the mark, then Napo can simply confirm that the MoC guarantees that employers must offer voluntary redundancies first, before seeking compulsory ones.

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    1. Presumably Unison also need to provide good information - I have never found a probation section on their website - do they actually publish this stuff or just communicate with members directly and via Branches?

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  21. Chris Grayling was in his robes at the burial of Richard the 3rd yesterday. A tyrannical, psychopath who some say is not as bad as history has judged him. The same cannot be said for Grayling. I have to apologise for not realising fast enough that as an ex probation employee, I could have administered a much-needed, long-overdue rationalisation and reorganisation of the Grayling goolies administered by my right boot but I only found out from the evening news, otherwise, I could have genuinely got there as I live close by. I would have been safe in the knowledge that any reports and subsequent penalty would have been processed by human beings who universally would like to do the same!. Tony

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  22. Can you believe this shit. There are some people who failed to stand together when the time came to strike and are now in tears having heard all the rumours that they will be thrown out on to the trash heap. Thy are now talking about wanting strike action. My response was very simple where were you when it counted and we needed your support. This is what you get for not speaking up.

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    1. The strike made no difference, the government would sell any way. So blaming people who chose not to strike is a little out of order. We all have are reasons to why we strike or not strike.

      Delete
    2. it may have if everybody has gone on strike

      Delete
    3. Go on then @15.38, I can't think of any good reasons.

      Delete
    4. Go on then, what do you mean by that. If you have something to say, just say it, stop talking in riddles

      Delete
    5. I agree that if we had stuck together including Unison we could have brought matters to a stand still. After all you cannt operate a system without people. Total and complete chaos would have set on probation if we all said strike. Maximum strike maximam effect

      Delete
    6. I agree up to a point, but MoJ played their trump card by giving EVR to support staff, ACOs & COs as they were all doing the work behind the scenes to ensure it could proceed. I know some of them are not able to get EVR now, but the operational staff never had a hope.

      Delete
    7. So what about all - NPS and CRC - striking now over these cuts? What will the public and the private companies, never mind NOMS think if civil servants go on strike because of private company actions? Has this been done before? Could cause a stir. And I'm talking all out for as long as it takes.

      Delete
  23. Some of the managers in Manchester are fast at work trying to secure their own positions. How they are licking up to senior management is astonishing. Bastards hope they get the sack

    ReplyDelete
  24. I agree,,, Mancheste CRC,
    I have heard today that crc in Merseyside.are holding their work awards tonight, , I know that this will have been arranged months ago. ? But talk about bad timing

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It's disgraceful. Is this the way we should be treated. Is this the way we supposed to care about each other. Basterds the lot if them. What haven't we given for the service, our time, effort, dedication, good will. Worked beyond the call of duty at a cost to our personal lives so that we can have a safer future and positive communities for our children. Instead we getting shitted on by the same fucking management with their same lies and false promises, and then they try to pretend pretend they value their staff by giving them a tokinsitic awards. If you want to celebrate our successful just FUCKING LISTEN FOR ONCE.

      Delete
  25. Is there anyway Lawrence can be legally ousted from the Napo role he holds?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In response to Anon at 15:34

      Yes, if he has not satisfied his contract of employment he can be dismissed, I presume members who voted (or did not vote an alternative candidate) into the post could initiate a motion of no confidence in him.

      Personally, right now at such a critical time, I think such an internal 'fight' would be a distraction and risk some members not getting the support and protection they need.

      I think the better way for full members to influence Union policy is to turn up and contribute at all Branch and General Meetings, offer one self for any vacant positions and to take part in all ballots.

      Delete
    2. I disagree!

      Delete
    3. Please be specific Anon at 15.58.

      Disagree that Napo members best participate fully in Union activity?

      Delete
    4. The Napo leadership should be challenged, and in my view, changed if this can be done with due process

      Delete
    5. Response to Anon at 16:47.

      Sobeit - it just takes two full members to start such a process.

      Maybe start by reading up the national constitution and supporting information on the AGM page of the Napo website - the local branch constitution might also be useful, if one is not familiar with procedure

      Delete
  26. I'm fucking vexed at the news. No fucking sympathy any more and no way do I give SHIT.

    ReplyDelete
  27. I'm hoping this is typed verbatim, having had it read over the 'phone to me by a very distressed collague in lancs. Its from this afternoon's sodexo Q&A email to crc staff:

    "Will you be offering the current enhanced voluntary redundancy (EVR) terms?
    No. The National Agreement sets out that the enhanced scheme that was made available to those who were employed on 31st May 2014, only continued until 31st March 2015. The opportunity to apply under this scheme is no longer available. Whilst we will be following local processes for redundancies, there is no obligation on providers to offer any enhanced terms after that date."

    and also:

    "We had planed on the basis that the majority of exit would be on compulsory terms, seven months after contract commencment, i.e. 1st September 2015, as per the National Agreement. If operationlly possible and staff wish to exit early through a compromise, we are currently looking at whether we can offer an exit package on slightly enhanced terms."

    And Lo, the Shafting was Complete.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Their position is known but the Unions (all three of them) are challenging this as they believe the provider's position is not in line with that agreed in the national framework document. There will be a national dispute.

      Delete
    2. Are they really going to challenge it? Or are they just going to make a big fuss about challenging it before revealing that they actually took no action whatsoever?

      Delete
  28. So, the fuckwits who were complicit in the shafting of probation professionals have been rewarded with 67 weeks' money and any other sweeteners they might have lifted along the way, e.g. consulting fees etc. Ian Lawrence has been pocketing £70K a year of members' subscriptions, numerous others are basking into the glory of the Probation Institute.

    The rug has been pulled from under the rest.

    "Before the Last Supper, Judas is said to have gone to the chief priests and agreed to hand over Jesus in exchange for 30 silver coins, and to have returned the money afterwards, filled with remorse."

    What are the odds at BetFred that any one of the modern day Judas's will have the slightest twinge of remorse?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. So what you saying? Lawrence out?

      Delete
    2. I never voted for Lawrence in, so nothing has changed in my position. From my humble position as an overworked and exhausted PO miles away from London I can see no evidence that Ledger, closely followed by Ian Lawrence & NAPO exec, did anything other than cave in, capitulate and sell me out over TR. If for no other reason than by a lack of effort or activity in fighting TR.

      Delete
    3. Ian is our leader. Stick with him and don't doubt his or NAPOs ability

      Delete
    4. He's not my leader. Would be happy to see him go.

      Delete
  29. Bit of a mistake to royally piss off the people you rely on to hit targets. Don't think many of my ISP's, breaches, terminations or completions are going to make the grade anymore.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. there'll be a lot of people going on capability if you play that card - i'd not advise it.

      Delete
  30. All one needs to do is "google" -

    TR Briefing for Branches – update on BR 134/2014

    "16. Enhanced Voluntary Redundancy – The balance of monies from the ring-fenced fund for this purpose is being handed to the CRCs as a Mobilisation Fund – supposedly for use in ’rationalising’ workforces i.e. redundancies. This should be under the EVR scheme. We understand that whilst the last day of service has to be no later than 31 March 2016, there may be some extension of the deadline for agreement, which is currently 31st March this year. We await confirmation on this point."

    *** also, ref a previous point on another day's blog:

    "11. Probation Directory – NOMS Communications have been promising for several months to produce this – albeit a document (PDF) containing only office addresses, phone numbers & names of LDU Heads – so not nearly as comprehensive as the old Napo Directory. Despite raising it at every PCF meeting, this Directory has still not been published."

    ReplyDelete
  31. From MoJ Answers on this very blog, October 2014:

    "32. EVR
    How much money has been allocated for VR?

    There is a lot of anger that enhanced redundancy schemes are being targeted at certain areas of staff when enhanced redundancy schemes have never been mentioned before TR in Probation and we are also led to believe that there is the possibility that CRC people will lose their continuity of service when as it seemingly always happens when public sector work goes to private companies, costs are reduced by job cuts. What can you say to ameliorate this?

    As part of the National Agreement on Staff Transfer, agreed with the Trade Unions in January 2014, the Ministry of Justice has agreed to fund an enhanced Voluntary Redundancy Scheme for the period to 31 March 2015. The Scheme has been targeted at corporate services and senior grades as this is where we anticipate a potential oversupply in the number of staff.

    The VR scheme is a very good deal for staff and whilst there may be those in untargeted roles who are looking to leave, there continues to be a business need for these roles and the scheme can only be used for where there is a potential oversupply of roles – specifically corporate services and senior grades.

    The National Agreement also includes a series of protections for continuity of service that go beyond what is legally required. Continuity of service for staff in CRCs will not be affected when ownership transfers."

    ReplyDelete
  32. Here was Unison's get-out-of-jail-free card:

    "It is important to note that none of the guarantees set out below for staff will apply after the CRCs are sold to the private sector. UNISON and the other staff unions are currently in on-going negotiations with NOMS/MOJ to secure these same protections post CRC sale, but we have received no confirmation from the Government as to what will apply after the sale. UNISON is absolutely committed to getting these guarantees extended after the sale, but we have no information at present to give you on whether the Government will agree to this. You should therefore give your view on the draft agreement solely on the basis that it applies up to the point at which the CRCs are privatised...

    ...Guarantees for Staff

    The draft agreement provides the following important protections for staff during the transfer to either the NPS or CRCs, and up to the point at which the CRCs are sold to the private sector in October 2014:

    • A guarantee of employment in either the NPS or a CRC

    • No compulsory redundancy

    • Consultation on any ‘measures’ proposed in relation to the transfer

    • A right of appeal against any decision on allocation to the NPS or CRC

    • Fair and equal treatment

    • Ring fencing of new posts created in the NPS or CRCs to staff employed by Probation Trusts (subject to civil service appointment procedures)

    • The transfer process to be underpinned with an equality impact assessment to ensure that no employee, or group of employees, suffers discrimination in relation to the transfer process

    • Trade union recognition of the existing staff unions to transfer into the NPS and CRCs

    • Continuation of national collective bargaining, and national collective agreements on pay and conditions, into the NPS and CRCs

    • Harmonisation of local terms and conditions to the most favourable, where two or three Trusts join to create a single CRC (e.g. local car mileage rates)

    • Maintenance of existing funding levels for trade union facility time into the NPS and CRCs

    • New jobs to be evaluated under the existing NNC job evaluation scheme

    • Three years pay protection for any member of staff who suffers financial loss as a result of the outcome of the transfer process

    • Normal NNC additional travelling expenditure and relocation allowances to apply.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This is from the NNC final draft under the protections, post share sale section...... Does that not mean that pay will be protected for 3 years if there is a change in pay which is as a direct consequence of the re-structre...... Whatever the date of the change?

      18. Where, as a direct consequence of the reorganisation, an employee suffers loss of earnings, s/he will receive protected pay on a mark time basis for a period of three years from the date of appointment to the new post or from whatever date the change takes effect.

      Delete
  33. Also from the Unison Consultation pack:

    "APPENDIX C: VOLUNTARY REDUNDANCY SCHEME
    This appendix is expected to set out the enhanced redundancy scheme which the Ministry of Justice will fund for staff who find themselves in posts which are ‘surplus to requirements’ following the transfer of staff to either the NPS or CRCs in April 2013.
    At the time of going out to consultation, the Ministry of Justice has not been able to finalise the voluntary redundancy scheme. This frustrates the claim of the Justice Secretary that he is giving staff 28 days in which to comment on the draft national agreement.
    On the basis of the negotiations to date, this is UNISON’s best guess at some of the features of the voluntary redundancy scheme, but these could change as a result of Ministry of Justice decisions:
    • The decision to award voluntary redundancy will rest entirely with the employing Trust. There will be no right for staff to claim voluntary redundancy.
    • The proposals are likely to be an improvement on the statutory redundancy scheme in the following ways:

    o Employee’s actual weekly pay used for calculation, not statutory maximum
    o One weeks pay for each year of service between the ages of 18 and 23
    o Two weeks pay for each year of service between the ages of 23 and 41
    o Three weeks pay for each year of service after the age of 41
    o Redundancy compensation paid for up to 66 weeks

    • Staff with less than two years service are unlikely to be eligible for the scheme.
    • Staff over the age of 55 will be able to take immediate payment of their pension (not enhanced), as well as their redundancy payment.
    • If a Trust has a more generous voluntary redundancy scheme than the eventual national agreement, then the local scheme will apply"

    ReplyDelete
  34. From the National Agreement Document

    "Principles
    The key principles underpinning this National Agreement, which has been agreed by the National Negotiating Council and the Standing Committee for Chief Officer Grades and endorsed by the Ministry of Justice /National Offender Management Service, are:
    • A guarantee of employment for all probation staff, employed by a Probation Trust at 31 March 2014, in either the NPS or appropriate CRC

    • No compulsory redundancy

    • The expectation that, prior to transfer, local consultation, informed by information provided by the MoJ/NOMS, will deal with any proposed post-transfer changes to employees’ working arrangements, for example, changes to roles and responsibilities (see Appendix A).

    • A right of appeal in respect of an individual’s assignment to NPS or a CRC

    • Fair and equal treatment of all staff.

    • Transparent, equitable and straightforward processes relating to re-organisation.

    • Compliance with relevant employment legislation.

    • Ring fencing of new posts created in the NPS or CRC as a result of the new service delivery arrangements to civil servants, accredited NDPB staff (including Trust staff employed by Probation Trusts at 31 March 2014)

    • Ensuring staff are consulted with and kept informed of progress."

    ReplyDelete
  35. Again, from the agreed National Agreement. We NEED this information to be revisited and I for one will be getting an employment lawyer to advise on any breaches by MoJ, Trust or CRC owner:

    "Voluntary Redundancies arising as a direct consequence of the Transforming Rehabilitation Programme
    This agreement includes an enhanced national redundancy scheme to apply during the transition period. The period covered by the agreement, attached at Appendix C, is up to and including 30 September 2015."

    ReplyDelete
  36. It's a sad time to be a Trainee Probation Officer.

    ReplyDelete
  37. National Agreement:

    "Step 2 - Assessment against sifting criteria

    The expressions of interest will be assessed in relation to the resource allocation needs of either the CRC/NPS/location and where these match, transfer assignments will be confirmed to the individual employees.

    If, as a result of the expressions of interest exercise, either the CRC/NPS/location is over subscribed in terms of the number of posts available, sifting will take place to achieve the required balance of staffing.

    Joint management and trades union briefing will be provided on the application of the sifting criteria."

    ReplyDelete
  38. Norfolk and Suffolk CRC's CEO has had some good news.

    https://www.gov.uk/government/news/new-non-judicial-member-of-the-sentencing-council

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Lord Chancellor today announced the appointment of Martin Graham as the new non-judicial member of the Sentencing Council.

      The appointment is for an initial term of 3 years from 1 June 2015.

      Martin Graham has for several years been the national lead for the Probation Chiefs’ Association and more recently the Probation Institute on Courts and Sentencing issue. He was appointed the first Chief Executive of the Norfolk and Suffolk Community Rehabilitation Company from 1 June 2014. He was also appointed as the first Chief Executive of the Norfolk and Suffolk Probation Trust from 1 April 2010. From 2001 to 2010 he was Chief Probation Officer for Norfolk Probation Area.

      The appointment has been conducted in accordance with the Commissioner for Public Appointments’ Code of Practice on Appointments for Public Bodies. He has not declared any political activity..

      HURRAH!!!! Timely, sensitive & lovely to hear. Innit sweet?

      Delete
    2. The Lord Chancellor today revealed his right royal thank you present to Martin Graham.

      A fat bald bloke on the telly said: "I've polished me gnashers, I know where the cash is. Nepotism doesn't get better than this."

      Delete
    3. Martin Graham is also Chair of GMB SCOOP and has been present at most of the National Negotiations throughout. I know he has been at the forefront of challenging the MoJ over TR and has also challenged Sodexo on their position regarding EVR. I agree the timing is unfortunate but the implcations are unfair. .

      Delete
  39. Does anyone have any clue about the future for Trainee Probation Officers that are currently training?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grim i would guess. You are there to fill the gaps while they get there shit together. Once you qualify i guess you can be posted anywhere in the country, plus with the cut in moj budget i would of thought there will be less slots for newly qualified. With 70% plus cases going to CRC and PSO's being cheaper not sure the need is there.

      Delete
  40. Dear TPO, the answer is that we simply do not know. It feels as if we all have an uncertain future and my advice to you would be to keep on with your studies and hope labour get in and keep their promise to reverse TR....

    ReplyDelete
  41. This was always going to happen. And those with their noses to the ground knew it and as a consequence argued for solidarity. But the 'broad church' lacked unity, hoisted by its own demographics of a predominantly female workforce, full of part-timers, without any appreciation of the wolf lurking in the forest. You can quote so-called agreements to your heart's content, but they won't be worth the paper they were written on. Napo leadership weren't naive, they lacked a warrior membership.

    If you don't fight collectively for what you value, then you will experience the anguish of being picked off individually. The only response to this savage dismembering of careers that stands any hope of resistance is a collective one. It's no good moaning, it's no good waiting for the axe to fall on your own head – you have to fight these redundancies through industrial action. But I doubt whether the sheep-like workforce is sufficiently awake to see the sense in resistance. Time for an indicative ballot?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, us part time women are to blame. We are weak. Hopefully there are some strong, warrior type, full time men out there who can lead us into battle this time.

      Delete
    2. "Yes, us part time women are to blame" - i don't think that is what was being said. He's talking about passion driven fight.

      Delete
    3. Netnipper 18:55
      I think it too simplistic to attribute the failings to gender or working hours differences. After all, many if not most female employees will have worked FT at some point in the working careers and may be choosing PT hours at present owing to their personal circs. In recent years working conditions for employees have been improving and were a million times better than they were 30 or 40 years ago. The wolf in the forest has always been 'complacency' and 'self interest', and the failure to remember the collective history that workplace improvements have been won in the main by the efforts of the Trade Union movement and its Members who stuck together and recognised the power and protection of collective action. The Govt know the Trade Union movement is currently in decline and this is why they are trying to undermine it further by reducing workplace facility time. Zero hours contracts is another example of the complete undermining of workers rights, and a blight on our employment landscape. In the end, a worker can withdraw his labour, and you cannot tell me that if 100% of the workers withdrew their labour it would not have an effect, because it would. I dont think we necessarily need a warrior mentality - rather, just a steely determination. I've always said I would like NAPO to put out a brief booklet to all new Members with a brief synopsis of the history of the Trade Union movement. Only when (colloquial) you see where we've come from (in terms of workers rights), can you fully appreciate what is is now we allowing to dribble away through our lack of solidarity.
      Deb

      Delete
  42. I say we should all strike right across the country, I am sure this can be set up and we have nothing left to lose. We have lost our jobs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree completely. We need to stand up to this oppressive treatment and take action now

      Delete
  43. https://www.napo.org.uk/news/sodexo-publish-their-new-service-delivery-model-%E2%80%93-hundreds-jobs-risk

    ReplyDelete
  44. 22 years of blemish-free service, and all I can look forward to is the statutory maximum of £13,920.

    A dangerous,incompetent idiot I worked with was promoted "out of harm's way" some years back & caused nothing but hassle whenever they were involved in anything. They worked tirelessly at ensuring the 'metrics' and other TR prep work was completed, then left at the end of 2014 with thick end of £50,000 - and continued attendance at the business management course the Trust had committed to funding for them at £10k a year.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have 31 years service and like You am expecting no more than the statutory maximum. Does anyone know if, in the case of colleagues of 55 and over, if they have to also fund the release of the pension(not enhances, but without early payment penalty)?. Thanks.

      Delete
    2. In our briefing we were told there were two options early retirement which CRC would sort out so without you having to pay the early payment penalty they would pay that. Sorry can't give you the exact wordings, or Voluntary Redundancy, not both would be on offer. Letters would be sent setting out the options to employees who were in the at risk pool.

      Delete
    3. Thanks anonymous 00:16. Are you able to say which CRC you are in? I am Cumbria Lancs and not aware of anything having been said re this. It may have been referenced previous redundancy rounds but given we may now be looking at statutory legal payout and no more I wonder if the option you describe would still Apple.

      Delete
  45. We need to strike all of us, all over the country at the same time. Sodexo need to know we are human and have worked so hard in the probation. it is not just a run of the mill job but a vocation. Strike

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A strike now will achieve nothing. This is happening. The chances of NPS coming out in support are nil, they won't want to rock any boats. There will be no impact on courts or prisons and no one will care if medium and low risk offenders miss their appointments this week. It's time to stop fighting this is not a job I want to do anymore or be associated with and certainly not my vocation. Time to move on.

      Delete
    2. I'm in NPS. I will strike with you.

      Delete
  46. Surely, with shared premises still extant. Napo and Unison can call on NPS staff to see what is happening to colleagues in the same building and finally get some fire in some bellies. Or is it 'I'm alright Jack'?. I think we all know the answer. If Unison and Napo had to go head to head in front of Paxman, Grayling would come out the winner, without even turning up.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. in my experience it's a case of 'im alright Jack and its caused an awful lot of ill feeling - really galling to see full time temps in NPS doing what i'm trained to do whilst I was sifted to the CRC.. The claws are definitely out!!

      Delete
  47. Yes the only chance is direct action and stop the system from operating and do it now during the General Election. If you dont you are dead in the water but there is no way the membership or indeed the leadership will grew a backbone over night. We are fucked.

    If the Tories win or New labour emerges they will privatise your next job, they aint going to stop they have a long term plan. Welcome to the precariat; soon most of us overwhelmed with debt will not know whether we are coming or going, then we might fight.

    papa

    ReplyDelete
  48. Lets go for it, we need as many on the site and start to get the word round and hold meetings get it started, before they know what has hit them. Jim surely you can help sort a strike

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. 1. Isn't that what unions are supposed to do?
      2. Have you thought this through? "Dear Purple Futures/ Interserve/ Random Acronym, I know you haven't announced your plans for any redundancies yet but it's happening to some of my old pals who work for a different private company in another area of the country and I don't like it so I'm going on strike. Ok?'

      Delete
  49. I'm in Cumbria and Lancs and I know my heads for the chop as I'm cheap to get rid off. I've cried since I got home today after the 'blow after blow' emails that kept coming through. It's like they punched us down yesterday and then continued to kick us in the head as we lay on the floor today... Thank you to everyone for your solidarity and outrage on behalf of us. I feel more together-ness than I have ever felt through this entire messy and ugly process.

    ReplyDelete
  50. Quote of the decade: -

    "Jim surely you can help sort a strike"

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course he can - whilst rolling a fag using just one hand and eating 3 shredded wheat. Jim is though, doing more than the bods who collect a salary for doing naff all whilst Rome burns.

      Delete
  51. Anyone in the CRC needs to prepare themselves for redundancies. Its going to come to all areas.

    ReplyDelete
  52. http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/mar/27/potential-conservative-welfare-cuts-revealed-in-leaked-emails

    Future conservative government as well will make probation impossible.

    ReplyDelete
  53. http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/mar/27/justice-ministry-under-fire-absurd-end-deduction-union-dues

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What's really absurd is that Simon Hughes chooses this, relatively minor, issue to pretend he has a backbone.

      Delete
  54. Only saying earlier this week in our CRC its been far too quiet for our liking. We have not heard anything from our provider since road shows were done in early February. No doubt its the calm before the storm. I'm sure the blog will have a lot more horror stories to come over next few weeks and months.

    ReplyDelete
  55. This might be a silly question but, now that NPS and CRC staff are employed by different companies, are we actually able to strike as one "organisation"?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes. It's the union not the organisation that goes on strike. As long as there is more than one member in a workplace affected by an issue that the union has entered into dispute with an employer about, those members in that workplace can be balloted on strike action.

      Delete
  56. If Jim Brown were Justice Secretary: -

    You will need to read Russell Webster's Blog to see what he wrote (I have reposted it in the Napo Forum as well)

    http://us2.campaign-archive2.com/?u=f3b97d02b5235c9e7c9b3a65b&id=9756ff38f4

    ReplyDelete
  57. To Anonymous27 March 2015 at 20:33 - Colleagues in my NPS office are all up for a strike. We know that if we don't stand up now tomorrow it will be us who are shafted

    ReplyDelete
  58. From Sodexo's website:
    "Our employees personify our values and are our greatest asset"...
    They're obviously making an exception in our case.

    ReplyDelete
  59. To Anonymous 18:29
    The way to go is through occupational health. Refer yourself and evidence the stress. Back it up with GP and make sure documented on medical record. Then go see personal injuries solicitor and sue the bastards for every penny you can get. Make sure you also apply for personal damages against your manager. Sue them as an individual rather then corporate for negligence and lack of duty of care. When the corporate orgnisation turns their back against on the manager watch them run like shit heads.

    It's fucking time to hit them back right were it hurts. In their pockets and up the asses.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're a disgrace!

      Delete
    2. Your knowledge of Tort Law is laughable

      Delete
  60. S.top T.hink R.eflect I.nact K.now E.viedence

    ReplyDelete
  61. just some suggested reading about redundancy
    1 .http://www.acas.org.uk/?articleid=1611
    2.I thought this article was good but it is produced by a legal firm.....http://www.ms-solicitors.co.uk/employee/redundancy-advice/factsheet-legal-advice-for-employees-dealing-with-redundancy/
    3. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/staff-transfers-in-the-public-sector
    4 .https://www.gov.uk/staff-redundant/redundancy-consultations
    5. http://www.adecco.co.uk/careercentre/career-guides/surviving-redundancy.aspx
    please investigate your rights especially around the selection process, knowledge is power in this area and it is very important that you challenge immediately anything perceived to be unfair but especially discriminatory please read
    http://www.equalityhumanrights.com/your-rights/employment/equality-work/dismissal-redundancy-and-retirement
    One final point, there is always hope however bleak life may feel for colleagues this weekend. Until we know more try not to panic this is a process starting for some undoubtedly and perhaps for many more to come, but the only good point I can see now is that at least redundancy would stop the ongoing hell of uncertainty, fear and for some, intimidation that we exist in now.
    Let's try to support each other
    A PO

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "Let's try to support each other"

      Yes, lets do that.

      Delete
  62. Please do not despair! It is likely that you will be employed, as economically you will be more cost effective - starting on lower end of pay scales etc. One of the worrying features of mass redundancy is how older staff self select themselves..it is illegal to select on the basis of age however life can be made so awful that older staff go. I know I am in that position.

    ReplyDelete