Sunday, 22 June 2014

TR Week Three

I had another nightmare IT day with it has to be said, brilliant support from our IT people. I was really proud when one of them (shadowing me again) asked me "how the hell did you manage THAT" as he tried to unravel something for me.... I tell you TR has nothing on the chaos I am now capable of...and I used to be soooo good.

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Rather than complete a breach, I've just won a blouse on Ebay. I now intend to do nothing for the rest of the afternoon, making a special effort NOT to complete a ISP that is due today. Targets...Meh!!!

Can any readers beat that for a 'sod it Friday afternoon'?

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Me! I took the afternoon off as TOIL. Sitting on the sofa with a glass of wine and catching up with Holby City. No Delius contacts done all week :-)

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Cant beat 14:05 bit I have been trying to complete a PSR on Oasys for 2 days. Person on remand & Oasys set up full report before migration of data. Went to start report Weds & received message saying prison got control. Requested transfer. Nothing (usually instant) got message y'day saying wip (work in progress) by another person. Me thinking what the fook are the prison doing with a remand prisoner? Tried to sort with IT help desk to be told would get back to me cos only one staff to deal with it. In the meantime CA worked out the Oasys remained with the Trust and I was accessing via NPS. Happens that I had requested transfer from myself who was the wip (hadn't started it but set up in my name). Due for Tues Crown Court & not started. Now on way to branch AGM so won't see it until Mon. Never requested transfer of work from myself before - a first!

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Has anyone noticed that there are (at the last count) 47 Probation Instructions that have been issued this year so far! Only applies to NPS of course. Covers everything that we do, some of them running to 150 pages ...licence conditions, Parole process etc etc. and has anyone been told about them, given a direction about how the work might be changed, as this is what is supposed to be governing everything we do. So if we get it wrong we will be told that of course there was a PI to be implemented on June 1st which explained it all. Fantastic.

And while I'm at it, has anyone else felt bullied by all those other agencies out there? Courts, Parole Board, Immigration, prisons....why haven't we done xyz, why is xyz lTe...tell them it's TR and swapping hundreds of caseloads being told you're doing a new job...not interested. When is someone going to give a bit of leadership and say this is an impossible task, they are appointing plenty of new management teams. Huh.


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Anybody else notice the NPS OASys won't pull through all the sections into the PSR? I've had to cut and paste certain sections into report.

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My manager couldn't sign off an emergency high risk recall today as she has lost all countersign rights as a result of TR.

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Still managing CRC cases and I'm in the NPS. Have emailed CRC manager who deleted the email before reading it. I put a sneaky tracker on it!

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Loosing will to live,yet another must read email with 3 large attachments that have links to more attachments that total in excess 100 pages

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Probation Instructions. In 2010, 21 were issued. In 2011, 16. In 2012, 20. 2013, 11. So far this year 49!

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Told the boss that I can't do my job anymore. I have no idea what's going on. She said she feels the same & can't offer any advice

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Finally, I notice from this piece in the Guardian that government u-turns are still possible:-

Proposals to allow local authorities in England to privatise child protection services have been abandoned. The Department for Education said on Friday that profit-making organisations would be barred from carrying out core child safeguarding duties, although councils would still be able to bring in charities and not-for-profit firms if they wished.

The decision follows criticism from experts – including social work academics, professionals and charities – that opening up child protection to the market would distort decision-making and dilute local accountability over sensitive matters such as taking a child into care.

The department revealed that of 1,300 responses to its consultation, held in April and May, just 2% agreed with the proposals. Over half said they objected to the introduction of the profit motive. A further 72,000 people signed online petitions objecting to the plans. Ministers had argued that allowing the outsourcing of child protection would enable more innovative approaches and improve services for youngsters at risk, but the strength of opposition forced them into a swift climbdown.

In its response to the consultation, the department said: "The majority of responses raised concerns with the proposals. By far the most common reason given for this was an objection to the possibility of privatisation or profit-making in children's services.

"The government recognises the scale of concern in relation to the potential inclusion of a profit-making motive in the proposed range of additional delegable functions – in particular child protection."

The response added: "The government is happy to respond directly to the primary concern raised in the consultation and is making an amendment to the draft regulations which would prevent profit-making bodies from carrying out the additional delegable functions on behalf of local authorities."

Kathy Evans, chief executive of Children England, which represents more than 100 children's charities, welcomed the climbdown: "We welcome the fact that government has recognised the breadth and strength of feeling about the risks of allowing profit-making in child protection. What the huge support for our campaign confirmed is the widespread agreement that children's best interests, rather than cuts of profits, must be the driving force in daily practice with children."

Ray Jones, professor of social work at Kingston University, who organised a letter condemning the move signed by 37 leading social work academics, also applauded the U-turn. "Local authorities can still contract out these responsibilities to not-for-profit organisations, but there is no route in here for the likes of G4S, Serco, Virgin Healthcare and Atos."

The DfE said draft regulations laid before parliament next week would still enable them to encourage innovation by delegating children's social care functions to mutuals, social enterprises and charities. They would allow social workers to establish specialist not-for-profit practices that focused on specialist areas such as female genital mutilation. If the Commons and Lords approve the regulations, they will could come into effect in the autumn.

The DfE emphasised that the sole intention of the consultation was to improve safeguarding services: "The proposals were concerned with improving the quality of children's services rather than savings, 'privatisation' or profit-making."

The children's minister, Edward Timpson, said: "We want to offer local authorities the freedom to deliver services differently in order to achieve better outcomes for vulnerable children – to make the adequate good and the good outstanding. If we are going to achieve the very best for our most vulnerable children, we must harness the expertise, passion and drive of all those who want to serve children's needs."

Many respondents to the consultation argued that there was little evidence that outsourcing would improve services, that there was a lack of child protection expertise in the private sector, and that there was huge potential for conflicts of interest. The government rejected these arguments.

Currently, only local authority child protection departments taken into special measures as a result of a child protection failure can delegate core functions to outside providers, a move that the secretary of state has to approve.

Although ministers have argued that there was a demand from local authorities to clarify the regulations to enable them to outsource child protection voluntarily, only two – Kingston, in south-west London, and Staffordshire – have sought to go down this route.

The charity Action for Children, which supported the proposals, said it welcomed the announcement. Kate Mulley, director of public policy, said: "The freedom to outsource children's services will allow local authorities to innovate and improve support provided to families."

41 comments:

  1. Re u turn on privatisations local authority children services, the same concerns have been raised about privatising the probation service, child protection is a central part of what probation does, probation practitioners play a vital role in child protection plans which involve probation service users. Probation staff monitor service user relationship status, substance misuse issues, mental health issues etc which could all impact on service users ability to care for their children. Probation work has been commended on regular occasions within serious case reviews regarding their professional deligence and persistence. Probation practice isn't one dimensional, child protection is central to what they do. TR has compromised probations ability to be an effective part of the child safeguarding process due to the service being fragmented and made more bureaucratic - children will suffer because of TR - mark my words - and when an incident occurs I hope Grayings TR is factored in - TR not thought through, not tested, not safe!!!!!

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    1. http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/criminals-out-open-jails-rob-3741267

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  2. Pretty good article here in the Independent about TR chaos nationwide.


    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/probation-service-in-chaos-as-systems-wipe-offenders-data-9554444.html

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    1. 'We have kept in close contact with the courts and have had no reports of serious disruption'. Interesting...

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    2. my large court team is really struggling and NO-ONE has asked us.....no leave or toil allowed

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    3. Britain’s probation service is in chaos after a series of crippling computer failures over the past three weeks, with thousands of offenders’ case files lost, frozen or wiped.

      In preparation for widely condemned moves to hand over 70 per cent of the service to the private sector later this year, the IT system was upgraded on 2 June. But probation officers across the country have told The Independent on Sunday that the updated systems are full of glitches and have even shut down, leaving the service under “crisis management”.

      Offenders have been turned away from community service, evidence has not been available for court hearings, and new offences have not been added to case files.

      The Shadow Justice Secretary, Sadiq Khan, warned last night that public safety had been “put in danger” by the crisis, while Unison said it warned the Government last month that “the potential for this mass restructuring of probation ICT [information and communication technology] systems … to go badly wrong is very high”.

      The Justice Secretary, Chris Grayling, reorganised the service in April from 35 probation trusts into 21 community rehabilitation companies (CRCs) that mainly supervise those on community sentences or just released from prison. Private-sector contractors and mutual companies formed by probation staff are currently bidding to run the CRCs, with the winners expected to be confirmed by the end of the year.

      The Government is also establishing a national probation service (NPS) for high-risk offenders, which will stay in state hands.

      However, this division is hindering officers’ efforts to work together on cases that cross both services, an issue further complicated by the changed IT system that does not allow officers to see each others’ files. A revamp of a system known as nDelius also left some CRCs without access to files for a week. A second system, Oasys, has also been hit by glitches.

      Dave Adams, the Warwickshire branch chairman of Napo, the probation officers’ union, said officers could not record the hours of community service offenders had done, creating a “huge backlog” of work.

      He added that around 30 offenders on community service had to be turned away in Warwickshire alone that first week. Officers did not have their case files, so could not be certain that offenders were not, for example, guilty of sex crimes that would rule them out of working on school projects.

      Other offenders who should have seen a probation officer within days of being in court have had those meetings delayed because court orders could not be electronically documented. “Colleagues are putting in entries to case files, then find them disappearing,” said Mr Adams.

      Napo’s West Mercia branch chairwoman, Joanne Perkins, added that officers, asked in court for information on areas like how much unpaid work an offender had completed, could not provide the information as they could not access the files.

      “‘Firefighting’ and ‘crisis management’ are the sort of terms being bandied about,” she said.

      Yvonne Pattison, a Napo vice-chairwoman and a probation officer in the north-east, said the system has been dubbed “nDelirious”, with cases “just disappearing” from computer screens and others closing down half-completed as the Save button was not working. This has created major delays: serious cases involving parole reports can take up to two days to write.

      Ms Pattison said at one point that the system would not allow updates to breaches of, and amendments to, offenders’ probation conditions. She added that new glitches were coming up “all the time”.

      Mr Khan said: “I have been inundated with horror stories from around the country, and in the past few days have met staff at the coalface in London and South Wales about the chaos that’s crippling the probation system. What’s really alarmed me is how the IT system on which so much relies is in meltdown.

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    4. “If information on serious and violent offenders is being lost in the system, or disappearing into gaps because of the crazy way the probation service has been carved up, that’s when public safety is put in danger.”

      Ian Lawrence, general secretary of Napo, said: “These reforms are an untried and untested dangerous social experiment which are being rushed through at breakneck speed without the proper infrastructure being in place.

      “We urgently call on the Government to halt these so-called reforms, allow the infrastructure to be put in place, and to test this new system to make sure the public won’t be put at risk,” he added.

      A Ministry of Justice spokeswoman said: “Where local IT issues have occurred we have worked with probation staff to swiftly resolve them. We have also kept in close contact with the courts and have had no reports of serious disruption.”

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    5. Bollocks, sorry Jim this is a load of lies, who ever is feeding the authority's a load of crap need to ask the practitioners. The RSR tool is crippling everyone and is an inaccurate tool, it doesn't take into account risk and takes hours and then you loose the document. CRC staff who have not had the training are not even doing them yet and continue to write reports. I don't know who comes out with all the lies, please bidders take note of what is said in this blog rather than rely on those feeding you lies.

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  3. Or alternatively, ' ... criticism from experts – including CRIMINAL JUSTICE academics, professionals and charities – that opening up PROBATION to the market would distort decision-making and dilute local accountability over sensitive matters...'

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    1. What about criticism from practitioners ? Those of us who do the bloody job. I am sick of "experts" and "academics" being held to be the only voices of authority. Ask US we KNOW. I am also really concerned that managers are masking the problems for fear they will be deemed incompetent so c'mon break ranks and others will follow please start telling the truth.

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  4. We know that there could have been a U-turn and TR halted had probation leaders, unions and all staff been active against the reforms from the outset. Alas this wasn't the case and now its too late. Best case scenario now will be probation staying as CRC/NPS until the 2015 election, with take-overs by the worst of private companies delayed until then. I doubt CRC's will ever go back into the probation bottle. If we're lucky Labour will win at the polls, which I think is likely. This wont be a reprieve for us a Labour will probably implement part privatisation of CRC's. If Tories win God help us!

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    1. I agree with you: the split is permanent and even if delayed there will be no reintegration as Labour is wedded to private sector involvement. It was Labour after all who got the ball rolling and approved private prisons and contestibilty. I see that nearly 80,000 signed an online petition against outsourcing child protection; the petition opposing restrictions on books in prisons has attracted 29,000, whereas the recent probation one asking for Grayling to be sacked, because of TR, stands at 255. There are some who feel passionately about safeguarding probation values but they would appear to be a minority. The probation workforce has been docile for years. It has coped with all sorts of central directives and has never struggled to find cheerleaders and 'champions' from within its conservative ranks.

      Napo's Dean Rogers set out the three options facing the TR architects – or maybe cowboy builders is more apt!

      'The first is ploughing ahead despite the economic risks to business and the taxpayer. The second is drawing back from share sale and (from the Coalition viewpoint) hoping to start again after the next election. The third is completely drawing back and reassessing how probation should be organised, including talking to local charities and combining local delivery with commissioning freedoms.'

      I assume that Napo hopes for the third option, but it is not clear what they envisage. What does reassessing how probation will be organised entail? Is this post-split organisation or does Napo want to see the split reversed? Would continuation of the split be viewed as a failure of the campaign to oppose TR? I am just not sure what Napo's objectives are. In terms of public vs private it will all have to boil down to percentages in the end, so when Napo uses the phrase 'commissioning freedoms', what would the parameters be?

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  5. I wonder if this could be the start of something big? It's certainly another nail for Grayling...


    http://www.itv.com/news/meridian/update/2014-06-22/staff-stop-work-after-staff-assaulted/

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    1. Graylings chickens can't be very far from the roost now. Surely other prisons will now follow suit in a show of support and a demonstration of their own concerns.

      Staff stop work after assault at HMP Elmley

      It's been reported that staff at HMP Elmley have stopped worked today after three colleagues were badly assaulted by a prisoner. A spokesman for the Prison Officers' Association said there were growing concerns over safety at the prison on the Isle of Sheppey in Kent.He said: " "Staff at HMP Elmley are today withdrawing labour under H&S. The walk out is due to growing safety concerns after 3 staff were badly assaulted by an intoxicated prisoner."

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    2. Strangely the link has now been removed!!

      Must be due to the internet being 'down'. Cannot think of any other reason, for instance, the Government asking them to take it down!!!

      Perish the thought.

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    3. The headline and link is still there and can be found here. However the page contents have been removed and I guess its only because THERE ARE NO PROBLEMS WITH THE CJS. (Honestly!!!!).

      http://mobile.newsnow.co.uk/h/Current+Affairs/Crime/Prison

      That is the full article reprinted above by the way.

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    4. Heres a different link to the Elmley problem, and a bit more detail.

      http://www.kentonline.co.uk/sheerness/news/prison-staff-take-action-after-19049/

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    5. And I saw this disturbing video:

      http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/victims-shocking-prison-violence-video-3631044

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    6. A pair of prison officers were taken to hospital on Saturday after they were allegedly assaulted by an inmate who was thought to have been intoxicated.

      Police were called to HMP Elmley in Church Road, Eastchurch, at 5.23pm.

      Under instruction from the Prison Officers’ Association (POA) inmates were kept in lockdown and staff withdrew to a safe area from 8.30am to 10am this morning until an agreement could be reached with the management over safety concerns.

      Mike Rolfe, POA representative for London and Kent, said that a third officer was also assaulted but did not require hospital treatment.

      He said: "Two were seriously injured. One was knocked unconscious and was still being punched while he was on the floor. Both had severe strikes to the head from a very physically-fit prisoner serving life."

      He said the POA demanded security checks of cells be carried out for alcohol and weapons and reviews be carried out into staffing levels and on the prisoner transfer policy.

      He claimed Elmley has a lot of troubled inmates being moved there from other jails.

      He went on to say that staff shortages and high levels of stress-related illness meant there were fewer cell checks for things like weapons, drugs and alcohol.

      Earlier this month an investigation was launched after a video emerged of two prisoners being punched in the face which led to concerns about staffing issues.

      The Ministry of Justice has denied there was any action taken by workers.

      A spokesman said: "Staff at HMP Elmley have not withdrawn labour and the prison is operating normally.

      "Two members of staff did receive hospital treatment yesterday following an incident at the prison.

      "The safety and security of our staff is of paramount importance - anyone who is violent towards them can expect to face severe consequences.

      "We have referred this incident to the police."

      A Kent Police spokesman said: "Inquiries with the prison service are ongoing."

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    7. Prisons are running at dangerously low staffing levels and incidents are being under reported. I have never felt so unsafe as I do now but at least as a civilian I can walk off the wings. What will it take to get someone at ministerial level to listen? Sadly I think it will take more than an officer being kicked in the head -and they expect early retirees to come back on short term contracts? I hope they tell them to stick it.

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  6. I hope Napo ballot for a strike when everyone else is in July

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  7. http://www.thepeoplesassembly.org.uk/support_the_mass_strike

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    1. It looks as if 10 July will be the largest day of strike action for two years. John Rees reports from discussions at the national meeting of the People’s Assembly.

      Teachers, civil servants, firefighters - members of the NUT, PCS, Unison, Unite and the GMB - look likely to take part in a mass strike on 10 July. It will be the largest co-ordinated action since the collapse of the pension’s dispute two years ago.

      The strikes still depends on ballots in some unions: Unison’s ballot over local government pay which starts on 23 May, for instance, and the GMB ballot on the same timescale. The PCS already has a live ballot for action but is likely to put a consultative ballot in place. The NUT is already planning action and seems likely to strike on the 10 July if that is when other unions strike. The FBU, is already taking strike action, and has pledged to take action on the 10 July as well.

      There is also talk of repeating the day of strike action ahead of the TUC national demonstration next October.

      These possibilities can transform the anti-austerity agenda.

      Earlier this year there was only the People’s Assembly demonstration on June 21st on the calendar. As the Assembly had decided no matter what others in the labour movement were planning we would call national action against the government.

      But then the TUC added their autumn demonstration to the upcoming actions. This was a real step forward giving the anti-austerity movement the chance to hit the government twice in a few months with mass displays of opposition to its cuts programme.

      But now the emerging possibility of strike action just two weeks after the People’s Assembly national demonstration, and more action in the autumn, means that a period of sustained opposition to the Tory coalition is opening up immediately before the general election.

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  8. Striking is not the answer. No one is prepared to do it for long periods of time and the odd day here and there has no impact whatsoever, all it serves to do is lose a day's pay and increase workload pressure for the rest of the week. It would be more effective if people just worked to their hours without building up masses amount of toil, take their leave and to stop papering over the cracks by doing flat rate PSRs. NAPO needs to get the workload measurement tool sorted out because everyone is going to be on massive workloads and there are still loads of cases to be allocated.

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    1. Exactly !! This is going to need proper employee care agreements with fully agreed and refreshed weighted workloads.

      NAPO as should all of us be quick to engage this as a key strategy. Particular before any although unlikely sell off attempts take hold !!

      There will be little chance of getting multiple employers to act in national agreement and good staff care. Sentinel for example and G4S. Well see !
      Dino

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  9. The BBC (and other media companies) should be ashamed and embarassed by their silence over the clinical dissection & wholesale distribution of the public probation service. Who or what Grayling (ex BBC exec) is using to effect that silence ought to be exposed.

    On this blog it was predicted that there will be serious injuries and deaths as a direct result of Grayling's policies - and all ministers blindly following those policies plus the idiot ideologues devising them should be equally culpable.

    The injuries are now happening... The first death isn't too far off.

    Perhaps Mr Brown could dig out relevant comments, with the dates and context of their submission, so that the power of "prediction" (or professional judgement in terms of risk management) can be shown in its full glory.

    Mr Grayling, contrary to your facile view, our observations and criticisms have been valid and accurate from the start. You are a dangerous sociopath who's ideological aims are focused solely on your personal gain, o.e. Wealth & power. You have no conscience. You don't care who suffers whilst you and your friends profit. I had thought Mr Wright had more of a sense of right & wrong, though. Ah well...

    "their blood is on your hands."

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    1. we already had a potential serial killer on the loose in Colchester - im just hoping that does not turn out to be someone's SFO

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  10. The study of the psychopath reveals an individual who is incapable of feeling guilt, remorse or empathy for their actions. They are generally cunning, manipulative and know the difference between right and wrong but dismiss it as applying to them...... Not that I'm making any links to Mr. Grayling.........

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  11. They work for you has this about the RSR tool - Jeremy Wright says all is well with it!!!
    http://www.theyworkforyou.com/wrans/?id=2014-05-07a.197568.h&s=wright+probation#g197568.r0 posted on 7 May 14.

    Sarah Champion (Rotherham, Labour)

    To ask the Secretary of State for Justice whether (a) his Department and (b) the Probation Service has experienced problems in accessing the Risk of Serious Recidivism Predictor Tool to date.

    Reply by Jeremy Wright

    We are carrying out extensive local testing of the key elements of the new Transforming Rehabilitation systems across a number of Probation Trusts. Findings are helping us to refine the associated tools and guidance. We have now completed testing of the new Risk of Serious Recidivism (RSR) tool, which will be used to inform the allocation of cases to new Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) or the National Probation Service (NPS).

    Our testing with operational staff in Trusts indicates that the tool is straightforward to use, in line with our commitment to minimising bureaucracy for frontline staff.

    We have begun the roll out of the current version of the tool to all Trusts.

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  12. Yup it is straightforward - ish....except some offences are not listed in the schedules and of course you need the relevant documentation to use it. So, sentenced without a report? Well then no papers (pre cons are a must), so you need to track down the legal rep who might have left the court or hope there is a previous OASys to read ( and then hope it has pre cons info in it) or just complete it without the information. Also, with the current problems accessing IT systems, you can not rely on getting the information. So, we now we have many that are inaccurate already. So that's alright then....who is giving the information that all is ok with this tool???

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    1. In CRC's we have no access to the RSR and cannot check to see if it's been applied correctly. There is no accountability or transparency with it and it determines the cases sent to us. Bidders beware! You won't know why you are getting 'units'.

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  13. Just a sobering thought but the Universal Credit IT systems are still not fit for purpose after nearly 3 years of adjustments and perfecting!!!
    The real problem is that the systems have been outsourced to IT development companies that have no concept of coalface probation work, and they've been developed on instructions of ministers who have no knowledge of coalface probation work.
    I wonder how anyone can see TR working safely when 70% of probation services are handed over by those ministers with no probation knowledge, to those companies who also have no probation knowledge?
    Just plain idiotic, stupid beyond belief, and damn dangerous.

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  14. From the Mirror.

    Riot-hit private prison firm Sodexo wants to run probation services for half the UK

    22 June 2014 11:00 PMBy Jack Blanchard

    Outsourcing giant Sodexo is bidding to take charge of newly-released offenders in 12 of the 22 probation areas across England and Wales

    PAPrivatisation agenda: Chris GraylingA firm running a privatised jail where lags rioted after staff cuts wants to take on probation services for half the country.Outsourcing giant Sodexo is bidding to take charge of newly-released offenders in 12 of the 22 probation areas across England and Wales.But Labour and staff unions have raised safety concerns and point to Sodexo’s cost-cutting record at HMP Northumberland, where staffing was slashed by a quarter in four months. Prisoners rioted in March, taking over an entire wing of the jail.Justice Secretary Chris Grayling wants to privatise much of the probation service with firms getting lucrative contracts.Labour’s Shadow Justice Minister Sadiq Khan said: “The Government’s reckless privatisation will see the same old failing private companies hoovering up multimillion-pound contracts."It will put the public’s safety at risk.”Sodexo confirmed it was bidding to win probation contracts and added: “We review staffing levels at all our prisons on a regular basis.”

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    1. Sedoxo are a catering company that make shite school dinners and hispital food.
      If anyones interested in reading about what a wonderful company they are, then this link to 'Corpirate watch', will provide quite a bit of info

      http://www.corporatewatch.org.uk/content/corporate-watch-sodexho-corporate-crimes

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    2. they used to provide the supplies for our Probation Hostels in the NW and they were awful - quality was awful ie bacon that was all streaky fat, bread within a day or so of its use by date and deliveries hit and miss ie sometimes they did not come and we had to order takeaways or deliveries did come but did not have all of the stuff that we had ordered.

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    3. Sod-exo are the ones bidding with the mutual in Manchester. I really hope they don't get it. What are management thinking how can they let this happen.

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    4. Lovely bonuses for your managers. They want you to do the work whilst they sit back & laugh at you.

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  15. http://www.itv.com/news/meridian/update/2014-06-23/call-for-a-reversal-on-prison-budgets-cuts/

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    1. The Prison Officers Association is calling for a reversal of government cuts which it says have left stuff numbers "cut to the bone." It comes following an incident at HMP Elmley which left prison staff needing hospital treatment.

      Mike Rolfe is the National Executive Council representative for officers in Kent and London.

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  16. Link to Independent story - couldn't cut and paste due to persistent popup ad by french arms dealing company:

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/probation-service-in-chaos-as-systems-wipe-offenders-data-9554444.html

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    1. No worries - we covered it yesterday I think.

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