Thursday, 8 December 2016

An Afternoon Matinee



I'm really glad I took time out to see this - simply a 'must see' film.

13 comments:

  1. http://www.vice.com/en_uk/read/spice-in-prison-report-volteface-narcomania

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    1. Two New Reports Have Revealed Just How Bad Britain's Prison Drug Problem Has Got

      On Tuesday, Justice Minister Liz Truss told MPs that "barking dogs" are being used to deter drug-laden drones from getting into jails. This, of course, is nonsense, and even Truss' own party members had a giggle on the green benches behind her. But the serious side of her gaffe is that it represents how clueless the government is when it comes to dealing with a drugs-related prison crisis that's spiralling out of control.

      Amid dwindling resources and a rapidly shrinking number of prison officers, the prison estate has – over the last three years – been almost entirely hijacked by one drug: the toxic powder sprinkled into spliffs commonly known as Spice, Mamba, Smeg or, behind bars, Bird Killer.

      The government's own Prisons Inspectorate has described Spice as "the most serious threat to the safety and security of the prison system". And it's not wrong: since moving into the adult prison scene from young offenders institutions in 2011, the widespread use of these synthetic cannabinoids has caused carnage.

      Today, two new documents exposing the realities of modern prison drug markets and how to tackle them are published. Both should be a painful but instructive read for prison officials planning the government's overhaul. Both describe a drug situation in prisons that would seem farcical, if it wasn't for the serious damage the situation is causing to inmates, prison officers and prisoners' families.

      "High Stakes: An Inquiry into the Drugs Crisis in British Prisons", published by drug policy experts Volteface, exposes the "meteoric rise in the supply and use" of Spice among Britain's 80,000-strong prison population. The report's author, George McBride, told me: "Spice has been a game changer for prison drug policy, yet the government has refused to change its game."

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  2. According to twitter: Justice secretary, Liz Truss, says review into privatised probation service to be completed by April and extended to include reform prog

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    1. Oh just what we need, yes more reform, good call TRUSS, yawn.��

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  3. What a bunch of completely clueless egomaniacs are in charge of the criminal justice system! Sack the lot of them and start from scratch. If they listened to frontline staff and service users properly they would not be wading through shit now and trying to stem the flow. This is a cock up of mammoth proportions and despite that they continue to spout the same old shite. what do noms do to rectify the situation? Oh, let's change the targets , what about securing housing for released prisoners and people on co's? Great idea! You morons! There is no bloody housing.

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    1. You're the moron 20.16 as you've no influence over anything. Destroyed

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    2. It's all so simple. Get rid of NOMS. Save billions, give more money to all prisons and go back to the previous parole clerk's within each prison. Now there seems to be email after email from people who don't have a clue of working on the front line. It really is that simple, scrap NOMS, save billions and invest said money on front line. I'm just a probation officer on Front line - it really is that simple. Am I the only one who can see this?

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    3. NOMS a totally unecessary waste of public funds, but necessary from the ideological viewpoint of dismantling an award winning probation service and bringing what's left of it under the control of govt ministers and prisons, create an artificial 'market' and exert a stranglehold on the courts.

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  4. We all have influence 21.20. You need to get over yourself!

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    1. I've power and influence. It feels good. Those that moan on here clearly do not which makes them feel bad and jealous of the likes of me

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  5. Hi Jim, its a great film! which brings me to flag up that a great ex probation colleague, Fiona Ensor, will be interviewed on BBD Radio 4 You & Yours tomorrow at midday (12,17 to be precise) on the subject of the appalling and -she argues- illegal treatment of her and her very poorly daughter by the DWP. She commented "I am saying it for all skint terrified parents out there". She deserves, as a mother of a sick child betrayed by the DWP, and as a great probation colleague, all our support. Please listen in.

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  6. Good for you 06.16! Going back to prisons, i caught part of a programme on radio 4 last night. There seems to be a strong view that prison staff ( not just prison officers) are responsible for corrupt practises and taking drugs and other contraband into prisons. There was mention of a prison officern with large quantities of drugs strapped to his legs who turned out to be an ex prisoner only 3 years previously! If prisons are not doing the right checks then this is the result as dealers will infiltrate where there are ready victims, just as paedophiles will infiltrate when there are not sufficient checks ( think football clubs)

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    1. There may well be 'corrupt' prison officers taking in drugs and/or phones and overlooking their (mis) use inside. Statistically it is probably very likely. However, how very convenient for Liz Truss and NOMS to highlight this at this time. Feels to me like they are trying to deflect attention away from the mess of THEIR making by blaming the staff and prisoners (and their families) instead. Shameful.

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