Friday, 9 September 2016

Women's Refuges Under Threat

This from the Guardian is really bad news and an utter disgrace:-

Housing benefit cap may force 67% of women's refuges to close – report

Two-thirds of women’s refuges in England are facing closure due to a change in the way housing benefit is paid to supported and sheltered housing, according to the national domestic abuse charity Women’s Aid. Government plans to cap housing benefit in the social sector at the same levels paid to private landlords risks destroying the finances of the refuges, which take in women and their children who have been victims of violence at the hands of their partners, the charity says.

A survey of Women’s Aid-affiliated refuges shows that 67% of those operating in England would be forced to close if they are not exempted from the reform, while 87% would be forced to scale down the support they give to families.

Polly Neate, the chief executive of Women’s Aid, said: “Refuges provide specialist support to help women and their children truly recover from domestic abuse, and rebuild their lives with a view to long-term independence. These women and children have been through enough, and they deserve better than services which are continually on the brink of closure.”

The warning comes after plans were revealed in former chancellor George Osborne’s autumn statement last November to cap the amount of rent housing benefit would cover in the social sector to the same level offered to private landlords in the same area. Women’s Aid said in the case of one English refuge this would slash its income from about £300 to just £60 per room per week. Some refuges cover 90% of their costs from housing benefit, the charity said.

A spokeswoman said it would more than reverse £33m worth of government support for the sector, promised after the closure of 17% of refuges since 2010 sparked a major outcry.

Sue Cox, the manager of a women’s refuge in Wiltshire, said the money went towards providing security and specialist support to women and their children, who often faced problems that went well beyond domestic violence. She said: “Antisocial behaviour, drinking, making bad choices of friends and relationships: these things all play out in refuges and work has to be done to ensure that they are able to hold down a tenancy after the refuge.”

Cox said specialists were on hand 24 hours a day in the refuge she managed, and had to be in order to ensure the safety of the women staying there. “If we are only there for an hour a day it is very likely that those families will struggle and those issues will still be an issue,” she said.

The Department for Work and Pensions said a deferral to the reforms until 2018would give women’s refuges a period of grace while officials conduct a review into funding for the supported housing sector.

However, sources within the social housing sector have said the uncertainty surrounding the outcome of the review was affecting providers now. Supported housing providers, which also include organisations providing specialised accommodation for elderly and disabled people, were unable to plan for the future without knowing where their money would come from.

According to the National Housing Federation, which represents social housing providers, building work on an estimated 2,400 new specialist homes has already been cancelled as a result and an additional 9,270 homes would not be able to be built if the housing benefit cap went ahead.

Julie Walters, patron of Women’s Aid England, said: “Refuges save lives: it is as simple as that. The government must exempt them from these welfare reforms – or live with the consequences of more women being killed and more families traumatised by domestic abuse. Domestic abuse is a human rights issue, and women and children need the specialist support that refuges provide to reclaim their dignity and strength.”

A DWP spokesman said:

“We fully support the valuable work carried out by domestic abuse refuges and other supported accommodation providers. That is why we deferred this measure for this sector while we conduct a review to ensure it is sustainable in the long term. We will continue working with providers to ensure the right protections are in place and will set out our plans in the autumn.”
--oo00oo--

Fascinating to contrast this with new statistics just released by the CPS and discussed here in the Guardian:-

Violent crimes against women in England and Wales reach record high

The number of prosecutions relating to violence against women and girls in England and Wales reached a record level last year, the director of public prosecutions said, as she warned of the increasing use of social media to threaten and control. Alison Saunders said the ease with which such crimes could be committed online was contributing to the increase in prosecutions. The number of offences against women, including domestic abuse, rape and sexual assaults, rose by almost 10% to 117,568 in 2015-6.

Speaking to the Guardian as the Crown Prosecution Service published its annual report on violence against women and girls, Saunders said: 
“The use of the internet, social media and other forms of technology to humiliate, control and threaten individuals is rising and it is something that we will possibly see increase further. It is undoubtedly easier to commit a lot of these crimes online, people do it without thinking, it is more immediate and it is about the reach and ability to communicate to so many more people.”
New offences such as the recently passed revenge porn laws were also adding to the caseload. Since the new law of disclosing private sexual images without consent was introduced in April 2015, there have been 206 cases of revenge pornography taken to court – with many individuals pleading guilty, according to the DPP.

These include a defendant who sent intimate photos of a woman to members of her family via Facebook and threatened to post further pictures online. He was sentenced to 12 weeks’ imprisonment suspended for 18 months after he pleaded guilty to an offence of disclosing private sexual images without consent.

Another defendant posted intimate pictures of a woman, who was not aware the photographs had been taken, onto Facebook. He was sentenced to a 12 month community order, fined £110, ordered to pay court costs of £295 and given an indefinite restraining order. However, 206 prosecutions reflect a tiny proportion of complaints of so-called revenge porn. More than 3,700 victims contacted a special helpline set up last year in its first 12 months.

Other areas where online abuse is being used as a tool of harassment and intimidation are within the record numbers of stalking cases being taken to court. In 2015-16 the CPS prosecuted more cases of stalking and harassment – 12,986 – than ever before. Of those, almost 70% involved ongoing domestic abuse, and many perpetrators used the internet or other technology to carry out the offending.

Such is the scale of the offending that special guidance is being issued to prosecutors about the growth of cyber stalking to improve prosecutions. Guidance is also being given to prosecutors on the use of false online profiles and websites which are being set up in the victim’s name, containing false and damaging information intended to harass and intimidate.

But the DPP accepted that historic under-reporting of offences such as stalking, domestic violence, rape and sexual assaults, meant that the number of cases being charged was only a proportion of the offending taking place.

Other key areas relating to online abuse showed sharp increases in the number of cases being brought. These include a 32% rise, to 2,094 cases, of sending grossly offensive or indecent messages under the Malicious Communications Act, and a 20% increase to 2,026 in similar offending under section 127 of the Communications Act. The DPP said these cases related mostly to online abuse, or abuse via text, email and other forms of technology.

Saunders also identified an emerging area of concern as the use of extremely violent pornographic communications, such as women being raped, or the posting of images of women who have suffered severe injuries or are being subjected to sadistic violence. She highlighted increases in prosecutions under new sections of the law for such cases, with 1,737 prosecutions in the past year.

Saunders said everyone from tech companies like Twitter and Facebook, to police and the CPS and wider society, needed to do more to tackle the growing scale of threatening and abusive communications online. “The flip side of that is that the evidence is out there and it is pretty incontrovertible evidence. We have been working with Twitter and Facebook to help us train prosecutors in how to be aware of what evidence is available and talking to them about how they can help us and victims.”

The scale of offences make up nearly 19% of prosecutors’ workload – more than any other single tranche of crime, including terrorism and fraud.

While some, including Maria Miller MP – chair of the House of Commons women and equalities committee – have called for tech companies to take more responsibility for what they publish or face paying for the policing of online crimes, Saunders said she believed tech companies were doing more to take down abusive communications and accounts.

But she added: “I am sure there is much more that tech companies can do to stem the flow. There is far more that all of us can do and that society as a whole can do to tackle this and make it unacceptable. We need to make sure prosecutors and the police are up to date with how people are using social media, what new platforms are emerging, what type of evidence we might gather and how we might use it in prosecutions.”

Rachel Krys, co-director of the End Violence against Women Coalition, said the rise in prosecutions being brought by the CPS was a positive sign.

“We welcome this comprehensive report, the transparency it offers and the CPS’s ongoing attention to violence against women and girls in all its forms. The increase in prosecutions shows that more women are seeking justice. But it is still the case that the majority of women and girls subject to these crimes do not report them to the police, and the specialist services which support them are fighting for survival.”

85 comments:

  1. Wot this got to do with us We work with perps

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh I got it. My mistake. I see how this impacts on us and victims

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  2. dont worry its the feminist fault.

    Really sorry for posting daily mail website.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/debate/article-3777053/The-feminists-turning-British-justice-against-men-writes-LAURA-PERRINS.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Why bother linking to this rightwing trash? The article actually comes from an organisation called Conservative Women which has strong Catholic sympathies. It's rightwing polemic.

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    2. You take that back lefty. It's hard hitting facts

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  3. Jim, can you switch the fuckwit filter on again please?

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    Replies
    1. That made me laugh! :)

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    2. If it was switched on 8.03 your comment wouldn't have come through. Neither would your deciples comment at 8.41. You're both num nuts trolls

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  4. Jim have you thought anymore about my marketing proposal in taking this blog to the next level. Was thinking if creating probation blog pens and mouse mats for nps and crc offices. This is just the starters. I can send you my contact details privately

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I agree. A marketing strategy is needed. Jim listen to what he or her has to say. It could save the blog

      Delete
    2. Thanks guys. I would get the blog over 10k hits a day. I'll make money from advertising which I'll redistribute. I'll ensure at least five guest blogs a week. I'll ensure our voice rocks the Moj and napo. Jim -you can all of this happen if you work with us. Together were United and stronger. This blog needs to go to the next level otherwise a new blog will start and all your customers will leave.

      Delete
    3. Unintelligent, uninteresting gobshite.
      Go and play with your crayons.

      Delete
    4. 13.58 remove yourself of the blog. Colleagues above give their opinions. It is you who is stupid. You're a fool

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    5. 14:20 and all the other times you've posted today.

      Why don't you express an opinion then, instead of the continual dribble you normally post which consists of low intelligence ramblings that add nothing and only serve to amuse your own low I.Q
      Get a grip and stop embarrassing yourself.

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    6. 14.20 their is no way you work in probation with those views your so you yourself fool

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    7. I've got the power here I'm taking over this blog

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    8. Absolutely. Because of course it is the promise of matching mouse mat and mug that would definitely stop me reading Jim's blog and switch to another. And of course I never follow more than one blog at a time, so tuning in elsewhere as well would be out of the question......

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    9. 13:21 - Just go and get your own site. If you are so good why don't you just do it and let Jim get on with his blog.

      Delete
  5. Alice? Is that you?

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  6. Is this the CJS at its joined up best?

    http://www.liverpoolecho.co.uk/news/liverpool-news/dangerous-prisoner-hunted-police-after

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  7. Jim 14.54 is bullying and this should not be tolerated

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    1. Annon @15:00

      It's you that should not be tolerated, and I have an inkling that it won't be very long before your stupid comments and childish outbursts are edited out and consigned to that great big cyber space dustbin with all the other useless crap that flows across the Internet.

      Delete
    2. For 15.25 and kindred spirits.

      'I learned long ago, never to wrestle with a pig. You get dirty, and besides, the pig likes it'. George Bernard Shaw

      Delete
    3. You wrestle with pigs. Weird

      Delete
    4. An Internet troll is someone who comes into a discussion and posts comments designed to upset or disrupt the conversation. Often, in fact, it seems like there is no real purpose behind their comments except to upset everyone else involved. Trolls will lie, exaggerate, and offend to get a response. 

      What kind of person would do this? Some Canadian researchers decided to find out.
      They conducted two online studies with over 1,200 people, giving personality tests to each subject along with a survey about their Internet commenting behavior. They were looking for evidence that linked trolling with the "Dark Tetrad" of personality traits: narcissism, Machiavellianism, psychopathy, and sadism. 
      They found that Dark Tetrad scores were highest among people who said trolling was their favorite Internet activity.

      The next time you encounter a troll online, remember:

      1. These trolls are some truly difficult people.

      2. It is your suffering that brings them pleasure, so the best thing you can do is ignore them.

      Delete
  8. Probation Officer9 September 2016 at 19:21

    "Women’s Aid said in the case of one English refuge this would slash its income from about £300 to just £60 per room per week."

    These refuges should not be charging £300 per week per room in the first place. Supported housing really cannot justify these excessive rent costs and are themselves at fault for putting their services at risk.

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    1. These are not solely rent costs. 'Supported' means supported by workers who provide a range of services - the bulk of the costs, as in all areas of social care goes on staff costs.

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    2. I've worked in and with theses places and "supported" doesn't mean much, and certainly not worth these prices.

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    3. The £300 a week sounds about the norm under the supporting people initiative, where hostels/refuges are staffed 24/7. What I've noted in our area, in recent years, is the reviewing and reducing of that Grant to accommodation providers has resulted in a reduction in support. Many supported housing units have dispensed with 24/7 staff - relying on CCTV to manage security issues once handled in person. Limited personnel around at weekends and evenings exacerbates the risks to vulnerable women.


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    4. Are you for real 19:21,I can't believe that comment has come from a Probation Officer. What do you think someone could get for 60 pound a week.

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    5. PO at 19.21 - what would be the costs of all those children being taken into places of safety by Social Care - Refuges have and will continue to support Social Care from the huge costs of legal proceedings etc. Not to mention the trauma suffered by these children, who need some continuity from at least one parent.

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  9. It's easy to negate any social service with that logic and it's what the MoJ think about the probation when they want to make efficiencies. The basis point is that it's crude to think in rent costs alone, just as we don't see classrooms without teachers as sufficient for education. It's worth remember that with refuges we are in the realm of services to victims.

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  10. The blog is titled "Womens refuges under threat". It highlights major concerns about the increase in risks posed to women, the limited resource of safe havens for women at risk, and the likely further reduction of those limited resources for women and their children by this inclusive, caring Government. The response has been equally as sensitive:

    - "Wot this got to do with us We work with perps"

    - "I would get the blog over 10k hits a day. I'll make money from advertising which I'll redistribute."

    - "These refuges should not be charging £300 per week per room in the first place."

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    Replies
    1. A general lack of humanity gets everywhere.

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  11. Mears Group one of the country's leading home care providers for elderly and vulnerable people have pulled out of providing care in another local authority (the 3rd in Merseyside). It says the councils offer of £13 p/h is well under the United Kingdom's Homecare Association advised £16.70 p/h resulting in them not being able to meet the National Minimum Wage and provide a good safe service.
    Whilst I acknowledge this isn't strictly probation related it is another example of services being run on a shoestring and bidders handing contracts back.

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    1. There is a battle royal going on between homecare providers and councils. The UKHA represents the private sector who want more from councils, in order to 'enable businesses to cover their costs of sale, operating costs and return on capital invest'.

      They want to make a profit. They average gross profit margins of 30%. Maybe instead of blackmailing councils to pay more they should look for efficiencies in their own operating costs and take lower returns on their capital investments. With a staff turnover of 40% they are obviously not well run.

      Maybe those who think non-profit women refuges are 'overcharging' have a view on profit-making homecare.

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  12. Jim, I am astonished at the extraordinary lengths to which some will go to disrupt your blog. It must be touching nerves somewhere near The Centre. Maybe their precious Luncheon Vouchers are at risk after the prison food blog?

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  13. Still keeping a wary eye on MPs business expense claims via IPSA. Some published figures for 2016/7 so far:

    Truss has claimed under £3k
    BoJo's claimed £400 (four hundred)
    Osborne & Cameron (remember them?) around £3k each
    Gove just over £4k
    Grayling... heading towards £7k

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    Replies
    1. It would be really interesting to know how much money Grayling claimed for during his 'out' campaign.
      The 'out' campaign was not official government business, and as such I don't think he should have been able to claim anything in that capacity.
      Would it be against Parliamentary rules to claim expenses whilst on a personal campaign any contrary to the government position?

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    2. CSG claimed just short of £20,000 for business expenses in 2015/16. This only applies to things CG calls office rent, business services, internet usage. There's no distinction of his time spent canvassing to leave the EU. So yet again the taxpayer has funded something else by stealth, i.e. all MP's wages, resources, etc whilst they were embarked on personal crusades over staying in or getting out of the EU. This in addition to the govt's £multimillion spend on leaflets etc.

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  14. Am I right in thinking Probation staff have had one 1% pay rise since 2010? Presumably you're aware of the MP salary increases while you were all being shafted & sold off? Now I understand you're being regraded DOWN via new job descriptions? And the senior civil servant overseeing it all is pocketing bonuses and payrise equivalent to a year's salary for many of you? They really are taking the piss aren't they?

    MP salaries (not including extras for committee work, for ministerial positions, etc)

    April 2010​ ​£65,738
    ​April 2013 ​£66,396
    ​April 2014 ​£67,060
    ​May 2015 ​£74,000
    ​April 2016 ​£74,962

    ReplyDelete
  15. Currently listenng to R4 unreliable evidence. Worth a listen. Try the listen again options if time has passed.

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    1. Clive and his guests discuss particular concerns about domestic violence, exploring arguments that recent changes in the law relating to psychological abuse and coercive behaviour are inadequate and ineffective.

      Outlining the Law Commission's proposals, Professor David Ormerod explains that they are designed to sweep away outdated, incoherent and ineffective laws and achieve quicker, better and cheaper justice.

      Barrister and academic Susan Edwards says it may be difficult to produce the necessary evidence to achieve convictions in domestic violence cases involving coercive behaviour. And she complains that the Law Commission has not attempted to improve the law relating to strangulation, a common element of domestic violence.

      Magistrates Association chairman Malcolm Richards agrees that allegations of coercive behaviour may be difficult to prove in court and says he and his colleagues are waiting for guidance on how to deal with such cases.

      Francis FitzGibbon QC, the new chair of the Criminal Bar Association, doubts the Law Commission proposals will make much difference and argues strongly that magistrates sentencing powers should not be increased.

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  16. So Dodgy Dave announces his exit Stage Right. Two questions - What's on Teresa May's 'to do' list? And what will he do next? Initially he'll be given some assistance to make adjustment to his unemployment, but it will not bear much resemblance to the package for loss of employment that probation staff have recently had to cope with.

    "On leaving the House of Commons, an MP will be entitled to what is essentially severance pay.

    Resettlement Grant

    The Resettlement Grant is the name given to the MPs' severance pay package. It may be claimed to help former MPs with the costs of adjusting to life outside parliament. It is payable to any Member who ceases to be an MP at a General Election. The amount is based on age and length of service, and varies between 50% and 100% of the annual salary payable to a Member of Parliament at the time of the Dissolution.

    In the UK the first £30,000 of severance pay is tax free. As stated above, the amount retiring MPs, or those who lose their seats receive, depends on how old they are and how long they have served in the House. For example, an MP who stays in office for one term (say 5 years) and then leaves office will currently receive tax-free severance pay of 50% of his current salary, or £32,383 at current rates – equivalent to an annual salary increment of over £12,000 at current tax rates and pay scales.

    For the 2010–15 Parliament, only MPs defeated in their attempt to be re-elected will get one month’s salary for each year served, up to a maximum of six months or over £33,000. From the start of the 2015 Parliament, it will be replaced by a "Loss of Office Payment", at double the statutory redundancy payment. "For the 'average' MP, who leaves office with 11 years' service, this may lead to a payment of around £14,850."

    Winding-up Allowance

    There is also up to £42,000 on offer to pay for winding up staff contracts and office rent. An allowance of up to one third of the annual Office Costs Allowance was paid for the reimbursement of the cost of any work on Parliamentary business undertaken on behalf of a deceased, defeated or retiring Member after the date of cessation of Membership. On 5 July 2001 the House agreed to change the allowance to one third of the sum of the staffing provision and Incidental Expenses Allowance in force at the time of cessation of Membership."

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  17. I have been contacted via twitter by a person who says is working for BBC " I am working on a story about TR / CRCs for File on 4"

    https://www.facebook.com/AndrewSHattonPublicMiscellany/posts/974822995973547

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  18. Did you tell the person to have a look on this blog ?

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  19. It would be good if she could be clearer about what she wants: SFOs at the time of the split or ones that have happened since? Does she want to know the mess some areas made of sifting staff and the huge movement of cases that followed? Is she investigating whether CRCs are holding up to their contractual responsibilities now or about how some may have pocketed the modernisation funds? Is it a story about then: when we split, or about how it is now? She says she's contacted probation matters - might be worth letting her know Jim's in France or wherever it is he said he was going to be?

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  20. I imagine Anons 18.32 & 18.59 (why no psuedonymn?) the journo is reading this, in view of my comment to her: -

    "I suggest you go here for better informed folk than me http://probationmatters.blogspot.co.uk" & her response: -

    "I've tried Probation Matters but no response so far..."

    I now see a Tweet I have posted has been liked or loved by 47 people so far - so she can see that as well & contact those folk direct if she chooses.

    https://twitter.com/Andrew_S_Hatton/status/775370002815938560

    I have also linked my facebook page here as well already - so folk can reach each other and give/seek more precise information if they choose.

    She is particularly interested in a case involving a person who was convicted of murdering someone in the summer of 2015 who had previously been jailed for serious violence in 2012 & released in Spring 2015 on licence.

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    1. She NOW writes: - She writes "Ah great, thank you for asking your followers! We're not really allowed to do public appeals - have to go via orgs usually so I've asked NAPO etc. Please do let me know if anyone comes back to you. I'd just want a research chat in the first instance - would be completely confidential. Anyone we go on to interview could be totally anonymous- I realise jobs are at stake. Thanks for your help."

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    2. Thanks Andrew.

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    3. Haton come on now. You're asking people to break codes of conducts when in reality things are fine. You and Jim no longer work I'm probation but others do. You're always going to get a few moaners but that is life. All in all most people choose to work for their crc or nps as they're happy and know they're making a difference

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    4. I second this. Hatton do1

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    5. Everything is not fine it is continual chaos.

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    6. I second that.

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  21. This Government would rather put money into grammar schools than spend money keeping women safe.

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  22. Napo are in the print media today - I have added a comment elsewhere and tried to get the article wider exposure via social media. https://www.facebook.com/AndrewSHattonPublicMiscellany/posts/975394265916420?hc_location=ufi

    ReplyDelete
  23. Who let Hatton loose on the blog

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    1. Who let the Hatton out woof woof woof. Get em hatton. Destroy them with your knowledge

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    2. Blog is hitting an all time low with limited or no intellect. 14.31 is a perfect example. Before the privateers this blog was full of interesting commentary. Now comments are of very low quality which kinda mirrors the services post split

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    3. Yes I have to agree. Jim will there be any new updates this Week please as the inactivity is causing the fuck wits to come out

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    4. Jim is away. He told us to behave whilst he was away but the ability to self regulate escapes some people.

      Delete
  24. Haton son. You can only blog if it's relevant and on topic. Okay? Happy blogging. The topic is refuges. Don let the trolls keep you silent

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  25. In jim absence I feel compelled to start a new topic as I can see where the Hatton caper is going. Let's talk napo and what has happened since the national chairs were elected?

    ReplyDelete
  26. Surely if Probation was in such a mess then the effect would be felt by the Offenders? Wouldn't such a situation mean more official complaints to management and above? If this isn't the case then why are your Clients not making their voices heard?

    You would have thought that having your Clients on side with all their horror stories of the effects from TR would have aid your cause?

    Or am I a Troll again?

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    Replies
    1. Offenders did make official complaints in my area, actively encouraged to do so when they complained to their OM about the setup but management just payed lip service. Complaints do nothing, from staff or offenders, mgt are under the thumb and are too busy feathering their own nests to speak up in support!!

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    2. I'm a manager and I can assure you this is NOT the case.

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    3. Really? What area?

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  27. You're not a troll. You speak the truth. It's just a few clowns on here keen to impress that everything is a mess when it is not. Things are fine

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  28. With the exception of a few, most of our clients are enjoying the post TR mess, nobody being held to account, for anything - what is there for them to complain about? PSS and new tiering, results in them being seen once a flood; which even the most reluctant can manage and if they don't there is no consequences.

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  29. 8.38 &20.08 hahahahaha lmao right now! Can you please share with us the area you are working in?

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  30. http://www.conservativehome.com/platform/2016/09/elizabeth-truss-we-will-reform-the-courts-system-to-ensure-everyone-has-access-to-justice.html

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  31. Jim you should be sacked for letting the blog get out of control and bring too lazy to write a new subject in nearly a week. Terrible blogging. You should take up the marketing offer above

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    Replies
    1. Are you ok 15:09? You sound angry and sad. Can we help? Jim's on his hols by the way x

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    2. to 1509 -Jim told us at the end of the previous blog that he was going away for a week - he IS entitled to a holiday - but asked us to behave - or words to that effect. A previous blogger above told another critical blogger of this on 13/9 at 17 12. Poor man does not deserve all this unfair and snide criticism. He will no doubt be as dismayed as you are when he gets back. Please check your facts before opening your mouth. The last thing you can say about Jim is he is lazy! You haven't a clue.

      Delete
  32. http://thelincolnite.co.uk/2016/09/police-dealing-with-ongoing-incident-at-lincoln-prison/

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  33. Jim is not the messiah, we do not need to wait his return, for we also have the answers when the right question is asked :)
    Much respect to Jim, excellent blog! However blogs are like trade unions, the more you contribute the better things become.

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  34. To the person who posted the following - I understand you may have a complaint or just feel aggrieved at the service you've had from probation staff, but please do not name individuals here but rather use the established routes for making a complaint. The names have been deleted. Thanks.

    Anyone else had Clients with PTSD as a result of Probation Supervision? It would seem that a detatched, uncaring, and forgetful disposition may not be the best of ways to approach talking to someone about their offences and life history?

    These people are responsible for unethical and immoral abuse resulting in the development of PTSD. I can only hope for their own sakes that they have seen the error in their treatment of others and are now working somewhere that does not have the potential for them to demonstrate such psychological and coercive abuse towards vulnerable persons.

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  35. How would I go about making a complaint Jim?

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  36. My Abuse occured a number of years ago and after a year Probation stops accepting complaints.

    Of course registering a complaint is a guarantee that the aituation will be dealt with and remedied? Or as stated above will my complaint be paid lip service and things to continue as usual?

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  37. I hope all names on the list have moved on from abusing people for profit. Im sure there are still a few stuck in the shits who are thriving in the cesspit of Probation.

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  38. I shall ask again Jim how do I go about making an official complaint?

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    Replies
    1. As far as I'm concerned there is no 'time limit' for making a complaint. I would suggest in the first instance with an historical matter writing to the Chief Executive Officer of the appropriate CRC, assuming it was a CRC or predecessor Trust. See what response you get, then if not satisfactory there is scope to approach the Probation Ombudsman for advice as to taking things further. Hope this helps.

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