Saturday, 24 October 2015

A New Kid on the Block

Bolts and Bars

It's come to my notice that there's a new kid on the block. A brand new venture that's sprung up concerning itself with everything to do with imprisonment or denial of liberty in its widest sense. 

Some readers might recall the amazing, but sadly short-lived success of Prisoners Families Voices, a website that provided a platform for highlighting issues associated with our prisons and which in particular made for some very uncomfortable reading amongst probation staff. From what I can gauge, this new venture seeks to do something similar, but rather more extensively with the benefit of some very clever software that can garner information, facilitate discussion and ultimately inform campaigning on a wide range of penal matters. 

If successful, one can imagine it will ruffle feathers in a number of quarters and it will be fascinating to watch what happens. The site does require membership and payment of a small fee will prove a barrier for many, but further down the line I guess this could change with advertising or sponsorship if the idea proves to have legs. I hope they don't mind my republishing their first blog which explains what they are about:-         

Blog 1 - OK we are starting our 'blog' today Friday 16th October 2015. Bear with us as we are new to this :)

We launched our company/website at the law society on the 18th of August as many of you might know, and those of you that don't please visit our website on www.boltsandbars.co.uk. To say that events have been smooth sailing would be a massive understatement, however we will persevere and we will achieve our targets and eventually our long term aim. We will stand the test of time.

We are not just about prisons or prisoners we are about everyone who is detained and by virtue of their detention is restricted in their access to the law, to justice and sometimes to the systems and processes which are supposed to assist them or their families. PEOPLE, HUMAN BEINGS who are in such places as IRC's (Immigration Removal Centres = Prison), STC's (Secure Training Centres = Prison for children), YOI's (Young Offender Institutions = Prison for young adults), HMP's (Men and Women/sometime pregnant = Prison), NHS Secure Units (hospitals = prison), and Mental Health Facilities. Many are not convicted criminals, they are patients, or refugees, or asylum seekers, however whoever they are they ALL deserve access to Justice and access to the law!

There are many forms of prison as we believe prison is not just a physical environment it is also a frame of mind, depending on your take on it.

"Who are we" is something many people have asked us since in their view we 'appeared' on the scene. Well to answer that question, we are simply a bunch of people who are in the main educated in life's hard knocks causing us to become motivated to raise awareness of the issues as we see them and affect change through the pro-social model of debate and comment co joined with a forthright direct approach to finding solutions and bringing those models to the attention of those with the ability to affect real change.

Usually someone who has been in prison answering that question in this context (blogging for a reform group) might say "we are mostly ex-offenders", but I won't. The reason is because whilst most of us are that is not WHO we are...for most of us could not be defined as career criminals or people whose lives involved the revolving door life of contact with the police, crime and prison, but it is true some of us are convicted killers, or convicted of conspiracy to murder, one of us was a fraudster (I say was as we dismissed him - and yes for gross incompetence, negligence and fraudulent behaviour). Despite that we still believe in equality, diversity, redemption, atonement, the fundamental good in everyone, no-one is born bad, everyone deserves a second chance etc etc...

What they may not know is some of us have no criminal history. We pay our taxes, and we have not just appeared on the scene. In fact we have been on the 'scene' for over 40 years. We have a wide knowledge base and vast experience of the issues we are attempting to address, we have taken a topical company from start up to spectacular success according to one government agency, until another ex government employee stole all the money (another story for another time) and we will do it all again. Many have tried and are trying to thwart us, they are the inefficient in the systems, the incompetent, those whose practice is questionable on a good day, those who have created a 'kingdom' for themselves and don't want their world disturbed as they have power and influence by virtue of the fact they have the ear of the power brokers...but therein lies the rub, and hopefully people like Cameron and Gove are as bright as they appear and will see through that. There are Charities and Organisations that have been 'working' in hand with the state for so many years, decades in fact, and yet NOTHING has changed. People die in our institutions, people are abused in our institutions, staff are untrained, they are under educated in subjects such as MH awareness, psychology etc, but also in concepts such as Redemption, Atonement, Forgiveness etc, complaints statistics are up, deaths are up, sick days off are up, JR spend is up, legal aid is a subject worth it's own focus - so many issues and we do have some of the solutions at Bolts and Bars but 'they' are holding us back from reaching those we need to speak with.

So we created the website for YOU to have your say directly. To comment as every institution has a message board for you to post comments. There are live discussion rooms where you can raise issues, complain anonymously for your friend, spouse partner without him/her facing a backlash in the institution, we will ensure it gets to the attention of the man at the top. GO direct to your MP from the site, so much access via our site... take a look , what have you got to lose. NOTHING you can only bring positive change...try it and see...Go To Our Website

51 comments:

  1. Probation Officer24 October 2015 at 10:10

    Pointless. Another group/website trying to tell us not very much. And the "I'm an ex-offender I know best" speech is yesterday's news. Probably another partner for the also pointless Probation Institute.

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    1. Well the Im a PO and read a book or two, got a CQSW and or Dip SW added to the latest Certs. All of a sudden you know all about crime. Viloence drugs alchohol sex thieving driving offences. Then you run some group work and call it therapy. Many offenders ex probation complaining about the poor standards. You all manage to sterilise it in a way that you don't accept things as they might be for some people and then blame the complainers. It is a large part of why the axe is coming the way it has. Probation management lost their way years ago. Privatisation inevitable because of that sort of attitude to people ,l who are trying and hopeful. Any offenders with ambition coming your way wont have any respect or encouragement. No wonder they are getting rid.

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    2. Probation Officer24 October 2015 at 11:02

      Actually no. I grew up around violence, drugs and crime, then I did a couple of stints in borstal and prison, AND THEN I became a PO, got a DipSW, a few certificates and read a few books.

      So yes, I know the system from both ends, inside out. I am an expert, good at what I do, and offenders coming my way get a lot of motivation and encouragement.

      My point is, based on experience, that these types of 'reform' groups are not very good, near pointless in fact. And the 'ex offenders' they recruit are rarely the cream of the crop.

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    3. This is the gold rush period where there will be lots of new and wonderful charities and organisation setup to grab a piece of the crumbs that roll off the table of the big private companies. They will last a few years then either fold or merge with other organisations.

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    4. Probation Officer24 October 2015 at 12:09

      Exactly.

      I do hope a bunch of probation staff get together and create a thinktank/reform group. We'll do a hell of a better job than most of these carpetbaggers and snake oil peddlers out there. Throw in a fancy website and hey presto.

      Seriously, with a bit of support from the agency this is possible, but I doubt it could be achieved unless done independently.

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    5. I was born in prison, then orphaned. I was poorer than the four Yorkshiremen put together. I was first convicted aged 5 and got my first of three life sentences a year later. I was a real bad'un - but I got educated in prison – CQSW, MA, PhD. My autobiography was a bestseller. Ain't nothing I don't know about crime and criminals.

      You do wonder about gold rushes and bandwagons and more affiliations to the probation institute! On the other hand, let a thousand flowers bloom.

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    6. 12.16 get over yourself

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    7. 1102 "I'm an ex-offender I know best" course you do and there is your speech hypocrite or fool ?

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    8. I'm not an "ex offender", I don't encourage anyone to label and categorise themselves by negative experiences of the past. Yes I do have personal, academic and professional knowledge and experience of the CJS. Im not sure that makes a hypocrite or fool!?

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    9. Reading this mixed position I regard you as both perhaps you have the nice benevolent help you obviously so self righteously expect as the cream of what a double ex prisoner who diodnt learn the first few times round. Now your an expert at what playing the game most likely and don't pick on me I am expert ex but not really labelling mysylef offender. get rid of the chip off your shoulder and don't slate new operation until they have a chance. Oh because you would still be in Jail most likely.

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    10. I'm not sure what you're on about tbh. The point made is that being an ex offender is neither a claim to fame nor a honorary diploma to being an expert. Fact is there are many very good professionals in the CJS that also have personal experience of it, and usually in their earlier years before entering this line of work and earning the qualifications. Most I've come across keep their past to themselves, a few don't. This is very different from Tom, Dick and Harry who were just released from prison and now want to tell us working in the CJS how to do our jobs just because they are ex-offenders.

      Bolts and Bars - no thanks. I'm not sure what the point is these silly groups and websites seeking to feather their nests.

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    11. Find out before you criticise. Your last post is well put but you need to consider the generalisations you make. Having just been released people still have great value.
      Just as you think your the cream as you put it is foolish arrogance. You have no special status you will never make cpo less likely ACE kid yourself out though.

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    12. Some of Boltsand Bars personnel also worked in the CJS prior to imprisonment . the post above about ex-offenders is both ignorant and uninformed. The response above full of generalisations is excatly part of the problem and frankly if that is your view of service users why on earth are you a probation officer working in the field, and cynically taking tax payers money fro it?

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    13. sorry not sure what post you mean or which is wrong in your opinion also state what you think will help us understand your position.

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    14. Bolts and bars - you are using the 'we are mostly ex-offenders' approach and this is becoming old hat now. Im sure any publicity is good publicity, but what silly comments about "working as a probation officer" and "taking taxpayers money"! Next time try to understand the discussion before you wade in with your foot in your Ltd mouth. I'm out (Dragons Den voice)!

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  2. something else to 'wither on the vine'

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  3. I could not disagree more.....I am also a PO and welcome any platform for debate and change! I expect there will be lots of criticism pointed in our/my direction, but I can take it, I'm not perfect, I don't have all the answers and I'm old school, which inevitably sets me against TR and all the petty directives that goes with it! For example, I used to use volunteers, not any more, as they are with the CRC's and guess what, it'll cost £30 an hour for me to access one! The whole thing - a crock of shite, but I won't play nice!

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    1. well said, if you need volunteers post your request on our website and I am confident you will have some!

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  4. Platform for debate and change is needed. Yes but I doubt this is it. The failing of probation in the last two decades is that we allow/allowed everyone else and his/her dog to decide and debate change for us. We accepted that 'hidden arm of the CJS' label and suffered for it when the others started to be heard even though we were the ones doing the frontline work. Now look at all that speak for us while we remain silent, Nacro, St Giles, Prison Reform Trust, Howard League, Clean Sheet, UserVoice, No Offence and now Bolts and Bars, and whatever comes next. Soon catering firms will be telling us what's what too, oh but they already are!

    When did any of us last, if ever, see a probation officer in a televised debate speaking or consulting as a probation officer? Because we're either too gagged or just not supported in setting up these forums/debates doesn't mean every other self styled 'expert' is worth their salt. The probation institute could have been that vehicle but alas it has not yet got out of bed with the MoJ, and Napo has been too busy napping since it removed 'probation' from its title!

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    1. Statutory probation became part of the problem. It took a reactionary turn – embracing IPPs, breaching licences on technicalities and other heavy-handed enforcement practices. If all
      you have is a hammer everything looks like a nail. It had no problems transitioning from client to offender. Some decent men and women held onto their values and remained user-friendly, but the majority collaborated, whatever the targets and however demeaning or unfair the practices.

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    2. That could be a description of my OM who seems to think she's judge, jury and executioner all rolled into one

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    3. I am sorry to hear that Anon 13:40, because Probation isn't here to 'judge' anybody - that is the role of the courts. I would echo however the sentiments of Anon 12:41 that it is becoming increasingly difficult (in the privatised probation world at least) to adhere to what many would see as our traditional value base - especially when (according to our ACO) it's "targets before integrity". I kid you not - the packed room remained silent at that point - there were so many jaws hitting the floor.
      Deb

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    4. it's "targets before integrity". That is truly shocking! How long ago was that said Deb?

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    5. Like any ACO would say that you shit stirrers. ..! Deb what area you work. I think your lying in your claim that it's targets before integrity. I'm so angry . Liars

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    6. That is terrible but too true, in our area, targets are taking priority over the actual work. All down to profits.

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    7. 20.08 your a liar. Work is profit.

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    8. I really take exception to being called a liar Anon 20:07. There were about 40 other people in the room, including another ACO who would have heard it said (and didnt correct it). It was addressed to everyone, in the context of looking at our present performance as an area.
      Jim, the meeting was mid September this year.
      Deb

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    9. work used to be so many things.... honourable, challenging, rewarding.....but yup sadly 20:08 you are correct it is now profit. The victimisation of so many in our communities for the profit of the few, I wonder how those shareholders reconcile their consciences.

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    10. We used to strive for excellence, but now it implied that the best we can hope for is to be 'good enough'.

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  5. I was a victim of a very serious crime and then became a PO, I just want to point out that probation was always a broad church, that's really what gave it legitimacy. Many colleagues do not know this about me and no service user does. I am aware that colleagues who are ex offenders often declare their hand and there is a growing kudos about this. It makes me very uncomfortable to see this agenda growing. I applaud people who turn their lives around but I really believe that the role of probation often gets air brushed from their stories.

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  6. Those who wish to claim Deb is a liar either have their head in the sand or up their own arse. Enforcement is bypassed, assessments made without seeing the service users, contractual measures prioritised over quality of service. Its real, its here, its privatisation.

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    1. I can see no cause for jaws dropping upon hearing that targets come before integrity. Probation and other parts of the system have been functioning this way for years. Six years ago we had this observation:

      "As a consequence of the constant monitoring and target culture, staff across the criminal justice system manipulate statistics to avoid the penalties of failure." (Harry Fletcher, The Guardian, 8/11/09).

      And surely most have by now heard that the obsession with targets contributed to the neglect and avoidable deaths of patients at the Mid-Staff hospital trust.

      Anyone who thinks it does not happen is wilfully in denial. Performance by results payments can only have additional corrupting effects. Although it's common practice, it's important to highlight it. It's time to switch on recording devices when senior managers are giving their 'motivational talks' and get this stuff out onto social media. Then their jaws will drop for good reason.

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    2. http://beta.uat-thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/3932892/Probation-officer-is-a-checks-offender.html

      With regard to media exposure, reminds me of a probation officer who for ten years had worn tartan trousers to work. He had a reputation for good rapports with clients. Until one day a senior manager passing through his office took exception to the attire – not corporate enough perhaps. So the dress code was deployed. The probation officer was bullied into compliance. However, the incident found it way to the Sun's newsdesk and the sorry tale was published and picked up by other news outlets.

      Well, the poor management was furious and embarrassed and try as they might they could not identify the leaker, despite trawling through the email accounts of local branch reps. There is no prettier sight than management being out of the information loop and thereby out of control.

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    3. I remember the case well:-

      A PROBATION officer was suspended — for wearing TARTAN trousers to work.

      The long-serving worker was ordered home after a verbal warning.

      Then when he complained to bosses about the punishment they accused him of harassing THEM. The row has led to a disciplinary wrangle costing taxpayers thousands of pounds.

      A source said the officer turned up in tartan trews “for years” before a senior member of staff decided they were inappropriate.

      It is understood the employee was suspended for half a day and returned next day in plain trousers.

      The source said: “He got very angry at the way he was being treated and it all kicked off from there.”

      The officer faced a disciplinary hearing after bosses said he harassed them.

      The source added: “It all got out of hand. Two senior directors were tied up leading the disciplinary hearing when they should have been monitoring criminals.”

      Probation staff do not have to wear uniform. Last night it emerged that the officer, based in Southampton, Hants, is appealing.

      A Ministry of Justice spokesman said: “Action was taken, not for breaching dress code policy, but in relation to harassment towards another member of staff. This case is now subject to an appeal.”

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    4. Memories fade but, around the time of the Wrong Trousers case mentioned above wasn't there another one widely reported about a male PO who, when not merrily OM-ing, was part of his local BDSM scene.(insert predictable "tied up at the office" comments here) It's always useful to know the limits of diversity.

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  7. Not all managers are like this. Mine isn't.

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    1. Anon @ 08.53. It does not matter what redeeming qualities individual managers may possess, what counts is what policies are pursued. If your manager told to tell you to stop wearing something, s/he would tell you. Your nice manager would still be nice, but would carry out the nasty orders. Now this may lead to a dose of cognitive dissonance for you, which could be a good thing, as it would at least be evidence of you thinking about workplace contradictions and thus not falling into solipsistic thinking every time you read something that does not fall inside your immediate experience.

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  8. I hope this man takes them to the cleaners. I've seen this happen to many probation colleagues, this was rife when we were Trust's. Rub up management the wrong way and they manufacture methods to discipline and dismiss. Harassment is an easy one to use as it doesn't need specific evidence. It's the same for bullying, insubordination and bringing the organisation into disrepute. The internal disciplinary processes are primed by management so they get the outcome they want.

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    1. That people allowed them to bring in insubordination was appalling and indicative of the rot

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  9. Violent offenders: Fears over management after release

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-34606636

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    1. Is the system in place to manage dangerous offenders when they are released from prison keeping people safe?

      Hetty Lewis's son, David Alun Lewis, was murdered in March 2014. "It was horrendous," she explains. "The liaison officers came on the Thursday night to tell us that he had been killed the previous evening. There were over 80 injuries to his head and his body and the man dumped him in the River Taff. It was a terrible, terrible, brutal death."

      In the living room of her home in Ystrad Mynach in south Wales, she sits holding her husband Glyn's hand as they describe the impact of their son's murder. "I can't explain it. It's too emotional. Sometimes it feels as if it's a nightmare."

      David was 45 when he was killed. Hetty remembers him as "very reserved, deep-thinking and very thoughtful". A worker in the nuclear industry, he spent much of his life battling alcoholism and depression and would sometimes stay in hostels. He was described in court as "vulnerable".

      "He was a very, very intelligent young man," his mother told the BBC, "but he suffered a lot from anxiety and depression and consequently I think he took to drink. "He left us a few days before he was murdered because the doctors stopped the medication and he was desperate. The only other thing was drink and he went down to stay at one of the hostels in Cardiff." It was while he was staying in a homeless centre in the city that he met the man who was to kill him.

      Gareth Wyn Jones, then aged 28, had recently been released from prison. He was jailed for six years in 2011 following an attack on his former girlfriend, and had a history of drug and mental health problems. Because of his conviction, Jones fell under the care of Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements, known as Mappas.

      The Mappa system is designed to assess and manage the risk posed by the most serious sexual and violent offenders, and reduce the chances of them re-offending. It requires the police, probation, prisons and other agencies to work together to assess the level of risk, share information and put a joint plan in place.
      Jones told professionals that he was anxious about being let out, fearing he would relapse into drug abuse if placed into a homeless hostel. It was agreed that he needed permanent accommodation in order to access mental health treatment.

      But no accommodation was found and he was placed in a homeless centre in Cardiff without access to mental health support. Within five days of being released, he murdered David Lewis. A serious case review into the circumstances of the killing has been undertaken.

      Latest available government figures show a rise in reoffending by criminals managed under the Mappa system. In 2013-14, 174 registered sex offenders and violent criminals under probation supervision were charged with a serious further offence - a 17% increase on the previous year, and the highest level in four years.
      Figures show that this type of reoffending increased each year between 2010-11 - when 134 Mappa-eligible offenders, supervised by probation trusts, were charged - and 2012-13, when the figure was 149.

      Five live Investigates heard concerns from anonymous probation staff that Mappa cases are not being given the scrutiny they need. One told the programme: "We spend 10 to 15 minutes discussing each case at Mappa when it used to be an hour per case."

      Another told the programme that "trainees are now holding Mappa cases and don't have the experience to manage these".

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    2. But there are also worries that some dangerous individuals are failing to be picked up by the system in the first place.

      Seventeen-year-old Georgia Williams was murdered in 2013 by Jamie Reynolds. Several years earlier he had attempted a similar attack on another young woman and had previously been assessed as "a significant risk to others".

      While various agencies had been working with Reynolds since 2008, he was not under Mappa procedures. But a recently published serious case review suggests that he should have been. The report stated: "It is possible that Mappa management could have helped ensure a co-ordinated, multi-agency approach which may have led to a clearer understanding of risk issues and how they may have been managed."

      Georgia's mother, Lynnette Williams, told the BBC: "If they had, then Reynolds would have been on the radar of these people. All sorts of agencies would then have been involved properly and perhaps he wouldn't be in the position he's in, as well as Georgia."

      Earlier this week, HM Inspectorate of Probation published a wider review of the multi-agency arrangements. It found improvements in its processes, such as a lead agency taking charge of each case, agencies being held to account, and minutes of Mappa meetings improving. Chief inspector of probation Paul Wilson said: "Recommendations from the last inspection had been substantially implemented and overall the quality of work was improved."

      However, the report noted continuing areas of concern. It found that risk management plans "were still not good enough". It also said that probation staff do not have enough computer terminals to access a central database holding information about offenders who pose a serious risk of harm.

      A Ministry of Justice spokesman said the chief inspector of probation's report recognised that in the majority of cases offenders were being managed appropriately, but added that the ministry was already working to implement the report's recommendations. "Mappa manage some of the highest risk offenders in the community, and less than 1% go on to be charged with a serious further offence," the spokesman added.
      Of the decision not to refer Jamie Reynolds to Mappa, the Ministry of Justice said: "This was a tragic case and we will address its findings in our review of the Mappa national guidance."

      5 live Investigates is on BBC Radio 5 live at 11:00 GMT on Sunday 25 October.

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    3. These exchanges from 17/10/2015:-

      "A leaked MOJ memo has confirmed the rumours that ACPO have been asked to respond to how they would manage if tasked with supervising all MAPPA eligible offenders. Can anyone confirm this? If true it looks like some of the MOJ's probation budget is on its way to the Home Office."

      "The memo refers to the Police taking the Offender Manager role for MAPPA eligible offenders away from Probation, e.g. Probation Officers would cease to exist and upon release, licences would be managed by the Police, who would become the supervising officers."

      "Police already manage Category 1 MAPPA offenders and they have Probation Officers too so I'm not sure what difference it would make to probation if police did start managing Categories 2 and 3 also apart from offering extra support like they do with sex offenders. All good isn't it or am I missing something?"

      "There is nothing to stop police services employing probation officers as part of multi disciplinary teams managed by themselves - this would fit in with their civilianisation agenda.This has possibly been on the cards since the introduction of the probation diploma - a stand alone probation qualification needs a specific supporting orgnanisation no more than a doctor needs a hospital - we can work anywhere now (though as a cqsw bod confirmed by a probation committee I prefer the old ways)."

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    4. If only people would read and understand the guidance and instructions re MAPPA management of sentences. If only people followed these. If only people would read and understand what high medium and low rosh actually means. If only people would stop using risk indicators ( intended to make the assessor think and question ) as fact. If only people would stop believing that trawling through every possible risk factor, applying it as fact and extrapolating every possible 'risk' eventuality is job done. If only Mappa meeting , when properly applied, would move from going over and over the same ground and actually move to discussing and establishing how, practically and in reality the risks could be reduced. If only people would stop the salacious and, aren't I important 'managing ' high risk cases perspectives. If only people actually talked to the person being discussed and agreed with them what interventions , constraints should apply. Oh if only, if only, if only

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    5. Probation Officer25 October 2015 at 12:34

      Mappa, risk management, public protection, tiering, it's all a bag of shite. The reality is the justice system and everywhere else is facing massive cuts. There is already a lack of housing, there's rising unemployment, welfare benefits are being slashed and services for mental health, social service, adult services and substance misuse cannot cope. The justice system has already been decimated with cuts and privatisation, and now it is facing a further 40% cuts. We in probation will now get used to supervising offenders that are chaotic and dangerous whom we can do nothing to help them at all because housing, health and other cash-strapped services turned them away. This is what the Conservative government wants and that's who will be to blame when it all goes wrong - and yes this will mean grave offences that could have easily been avoided.

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    6. I agree that there are massive resource obstacles facing anyone working to reduce crime. Despite stretched resources there is some evidence that existing, though poorly resourced, Mappa work does reduce the risk of further serious offending. And the sociological evidence, below, suggests that risks of reoffending could be further reduced if economic inequalities were reduced.

      The link between economic inequality and both property crime and violent crime is well established:

      Rates of violence are higher in more unequal societies2.  This finding holds up in many different contexts, when looked at via different methodologies and after controlling for other determinants of crime such as low income, unemployment, and teen birth rates

      Small permanent decreases in inequality - such as reducing inequality from the level found in Spain to that in Canada - would reduce homicides by 20% and lead to a 23% long-term reduction in robberies.

      https://www.equalitytrust.org.uk/crime

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  10. Failures by those charged with managing risk crop up with sickening regularity. It's always the same failings – poor communication between agencies, missed opportunities to recognise signs of raised risk, not sharing information, complacent group-think in Mappas.

    Giving the police overall responsibility would not be the remedy. No single agency has all the skills or resources. Effective risk management will still depend on multi-disciplinary working and the conscientious sharing and analysis of information.

    Anon @ 11.26 is word perfect what should be done, but all too often isn't. After all these years of Mappa elementary failures to recognise risk indicators are still be missed.

    This is a recent case that the police had overall responsibility for:

    (1). In 2008 Reynolds tries to attack a 16-year-old girl by luring her to his house and grabbing her by the throat. He was given a final warning by police. (2). A doctor assesses he has become a "significant risk to others" (3). In 2011 Reynolds is reported to police for reversing his car into a girl who spurned his advances. No link is made to the existing information on him. (4).In 2013 he lures Georgia Williams to his home on the pretext of helping with a photo shoot. He kills her by hanging her from a length of rope attached to a loft hatch.

    The report stated: "Although at least eight agencies... had involvement in the case, at no time did all those agencies meet together and there was no clear and co-ordinated approach to multi-agency working."

    Mr Williams, and his wife Lynnette said they believed Georgia's death could have been prevented if agencies tasked with working with Reynolds had "done their jobs properly".

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-34465925

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    1. Oh yes I forgot about that one - doesn't bode well for the police.....

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  11. Work for Probation? Work for Police? Risk management? Risk assessment? Now you can listen to The Master at work - the Blairweasel is on the loose & spinning in a media frenzy near you. For a fee (of course) you can learn hw to slip through the net of responsibility. Its a bit like the confusion of JackStraws or drawing that last skewer in KerBlunkett. Simply send your bank account details via TalkTalk & wait for your next statement. 100% of all funds embezzled will be unrecoverable. The stench of bullshit can intensify as well as dissipate.

    I'd like to reiterate my view that Risk of Harm based on 'intelligence' is simply a lucrative, absolutist pseudo-science & a myth used to frighten & control. Lets take BlairWeasel's "45 minutes". The Middle East was totally destabilised & Isis allowed to blossom as a direct consequence of the "45 minutes" lie & the utterly inappropriate wholesale invasion using US & UK troops underpinned by £Billions of our taxpayer funds. Blair is now backpedalling like a good'un, but the damage is done & history is what it is. The backstory is deemed irrelevant, done, "time to move on & deal with the here & now", JFDI.

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  12. Mappa is a waste of time in my area! Probation and police are left to deal with all the shite without any resources accommodation and mental Heath are mainly useless unable to make any decisions at Mappa meetings Its getting very difficult to help rehabilitate offenders thus reducing their risk when these agencies just don't want to work with them! It's getting ridiculous I have many examples such as MH turning a patient away on his first appointment because he didn't have his medical history and looked angry! Believe me he was the only calm one seems like it's only going to get worse

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    1. Same as in my area. Mappa is pointless. There are no resources and all the other agencies do nothing. Probation is lumbered with all the responsibility and the other agencies do nothing.

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