Saturday, 15 August 2015

Anyone But Corbyn?

It's Saturday. Lets stick my neck out and talk about something else for a change. I'm not a member of any political party and have resisted the temptation to cough-up £3 in order to help the Labour Party choose their next leader, but I'm certainly watching things closely. 

In many respects the process could be described as somewhere between a grotesque charade and a slow car crash. Whoever thought up the £3 voting scam needs shooting. Oh, it was Ed Miliband? Rather worryingly, career politicians are often not too good at thinking through the consequences of their actions are they? When the dust settles and the Tories have stopped laughing, I wonder how long it will be before that idea bites the dust along with that infamous 'Edstone'.

Ever since certain people in the Labour Party quite rightly thought it would be a jolly good idea to have a proper debate and get Jeremy Corbyn in the race, we've witnessed a most unedifying spectacle of him being comprehensively rubbished. Not only by the three other lack-lustre candidates, but by the Blairite big guns as well, including the sun-tanned multi-millionaire and sad former world leader himself. 

None of them seem able to grasp that the more fervent and feverish the apocalyptic claims are made as to the Party being consigned to electoral oblivion, the higher Corbyn's popularity rises. There's no doubt he's going to win and for the first time we are going to have a real on-going debate as to another possible way out of the mess we're currently in and that alone is surely good for our country and our democracy?

But lets not get too carried away here. Corbyn isn't a potential Prime Minister, but then none of the candidates are. Without even having listened to the guy, I'm going to stick my neck out and predict that, unlike the other candidates, he has sufficient insight and humility to know this. I believe other much more serious and credible contenders will start to see which way an alternative wind is blowing and build upon the barnstorming work already undertaken by Corbyn.

Corbyn has set in motion a fundamental debate about an alternative to Blairite policies and in the process flushed out the apologists and quasi Tories like Yvette Cooper. In the coming weeks I predict some keen aspiring backbenchers will be only too happy to nail their colours to Corbyn's mast and from this bunch will emerge a non-Blairite but credible leader and possible future Prime Minister. I would remind readers that we've yet to see the true cut of Keir Starmers jib for instance.

Without a hint of irony, it's really interesting to hear the likes of Yvette Cooper describing Corbyn's ideas as being 'old-fashioned', when in fact they are novel and refreshingly new to many people and it is she that is stuck in a Blairite past. Here's Corbyn's Manifesto:-   

  • Growth not austerity – with a national investment bank to help create tomorrow’s jobs and reduce the deficit fairly. Fair taxes for all – let the broadest shoulders bear the biggest burden to balance the books.
  • A lower welfare bill through investment and growth not squeezing the least well-off and cuts to child tax credits.
  • Action on climate change – for the long-term interest of the planet rather than the short-term interests of corporate profits.
  • Public ownership of railways and in the energy sector – privatisation has put profits before people.
  • Decent homes for all in public and private sectors by 2025 through a big housebuilding programme and controlling rents.
  • No more illegal wars, a foreign policy that prioritises justice and assistance. Replacing Trident not with a new generation of nuclear weapons but jobs that retain the communities’ skills.
  • Fully-funded NHS, integrated with social care, with an end to privatisation in health.
  • Protection at work – no zero hours contracts, strong collective bargaining to stamp out workplace injustice.
  • Equality for all – a society that accepts no barriers to everyone’s talents and contribution. An end to scapegoating of migrants.
  • A life-long national education service for decent skills and opportunities throughout our lives: universal childcare, abolishing student fees and restoring grants, and funding adult skills training throughout our lives.

It's a really interesting list and although I can't go along with not replacing Trident, putting a stop to privatising the NHS is a no-brainer and hugely popular with the general public, across all political parties, as indeed is bringing back the railways into public ownership. I predict membership of the Labour Party will rise following Corbyn's election precisely because there's plenty of blue water beginning to emerge between the two main parties once again.

But lets not get carried away. Despite my theory that Corbyn will be a willing interim leader, there are problems. I think he's dodgy on matters like the IRA and there's the small but important sartorial matter. I'm led to believe that advisers that include our very own former Assistant General Secretary Harry Fletcher have had advice rebuffed, but what might be ok for the Greek Prime Minister doesn't go down well here. Fortunately we have Parliamentary codes on such matters as ties, but surely Mr Corbyn wouldn't want the story to become one about dress as with poor old Michael Foot and the infamous Cenotaph donkey jacket? 

We're in for interesting times and the leadership result will initiate a real shake-up, not just in the Labour Party, but across the political spectrum because for the fist time in a long time, someone is daring to suggest real alternatives. But the naysayers will say but will it win an election? The answer is of course no! But that's because Corbyn has ducked the really big question of electoral reform. 

Our electoral system was designed to deal with old-fashioned class-based politics in a broadly two party system, and both parties felt it suited them for years. That game is over and Labour must start talking about a change to Proportional Representation. No matter how much traction Corbyn's ideas gain, and I predict a lot, it counts for nothing under the present system where the hugely popular UKIP gained 4 million votes, but just a single MP. Come on Corbyn - be really radical!   

60 comments:

  1. I hope Corbyn does get elected. We don't know how much wider traction his ideas will gain as they get a wider audience. The ideas he esposes are resonating. I have no problem with not having independent nuclear deterrent. It's a perfectly reasonable stance. It was the Left who for years urged talks with the IRA and he is no more suspect on this than is the Queen for shaking hands with former terrorists/rebels. I quite like his dress sense. The history of many political struggles - from liberating colonies to establishing the state of Israel are the histories of terrorists becoming presidents and prime ministers. I hope it's not long before Corbyn faces Cameron across the dispatch box and then we will see whose arguments tap popular sentiments.

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    1. "from liberating colonies to establishing the state of Israel are the histories of terrorists becoming presidents and prime ministers".

      Yep....the left can`t comment on much these days without a derogatory reference to Israel. From Ernest Bevan to Corbyn is but an instant!

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    2. What exactly is the problem with Netnipper's comment, JP? Its a statement of fact. If telling the truth is "derogatory" now, we're in a sorry state indeed.....

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    3. There is always a backlash whenever Israel is mentioned in anything but a glowing light. Denying truths is never good in any circumstances.

      There are many examples of Jewish 'terrorists' who went on to become legitimate leaders. For example, Menachem Begin, a former prime minister who previously was the leader of Irgun, the terrorist group that blew up the King David Hotel, killing 91. At the time it was a British headquarters.

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    4. There are so few ex colonies, territories to choose from of course where war lords, terrorists bame supreme and/or chaos reigned...India/Pakistan where 3 million died in the debacle in 1947, Kenya and mau mau, Nigeria and its civil war(s), Sudan, Sierra Leone....the list goes on but it`s always Israel with its history of securing its independance at the cost of the deaths of 10% of its population at the time that`s held up as the pariah state by the LEFT

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    5. Not sure what your point is, as you could add in the 'exterminate the brutes' genocides against the native Americans, Australians and Africans.

      The Jewish population in 1948 was a third and 6,000 were killed against 10,000 Arabs. Losses were considerable for both groups. But if you really want to examine proportionality have a look at more recent statistics.

      You are living in ignorance if you think the behaviour of Israel is only a concern of the Left, read Avi Shlaim, who is a respected historian, not a rabid left-winger. Probably a 'self-hating' Jew in your book though.

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    6. The population of the newly established state was 600,000 Jews of whom 6,000 were killed in a war against the armies of Egypt Jordan Iraq Lebanon. USSR was the first country to recognise the new state.
      With all the horrors in the Middle East and elsewhere it seems to be a symbol of socialist commitment to be anti Israel per se irrespective of truth and history

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    7. You've badly misread Netnipper's original comment, JP, and in doing so have revealed your own biases rather than exposing someone else's.

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    8. Hope you don't think it's anti Israel to pull you up on your sums but 6000 is 1% of 600,000. Isn't it?

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  2. Agreed Netnipper. Corbyn doesnt need to win an election outright- take a handful of seats from thr tories and their majority is gone. And if he's true to his word to work with theSNP, we have a radical coalition. And if he takes some of his other comments to their logical conclusion, and arraigns blair to the Hague as a war criminal, I'll rejoin the labour party!

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    1. I have never voted Labour but would vote for Corbyn. True Socialist policies not like the other 3 Tory clones.

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  3. My problem with politics is the way the parties constantly change their position to win popularity.
    I want to vote for a party that has a fundamental core principle base that is constant and stands for values that I share. I don't care if that party is the most popular party or not as long as the values they stand on are defined by ideology and not by popularity or fashon, or constantly changing to compete with its opposition.
    I believe Corbyn could just be the person to 're-root' the Labour party as a party founded on fundamental principles, and move it away from a party that in recent years concerned itself far more with popularity then base values.

    'Getafix'

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    1. Totally agree with you Getafix and cringe every time someone says JB is not prime minister material, not sure I understandtheir thinking, other than a narrow stereotypical view based on appearance ,not policy! On that one, I was reflecting on past, elected PM's - who, based on visual appeal would ever of thought the maggot hatcher, the insincere, smirking Blair or the equally insincere, plastic Cameron, would have been so embraced by the public? JB looks like an intelligent, honest and principled individual. Mr Ordinary, he looks like the rest of us!

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    2. Who is JB Anon at 09:51?

      I suggest you proof read any future posts.

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    3. Oops- should read JC, think I was thinking about Jim Brown when writing!

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  4. er... am not specifically getting at Corbyn, but where in his manifesto or speeches does he mention the Justice system?? Education- tick, NHS - tick, welfare -tick, austerity - tick, social housing - tick, foreign policy- tick, green issues-tick, touching on employment - tick, public not private - nearly there - oh, its the railways and energy- tick.. I presume he doesn't spread the word because it is not a vote catcher - no one knows what Probation does - or should I update it - 'used to do and would like to continue to do'? Is he waiting for crime rates to shoot up? Or will we see 'interesting' stats?

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  5. Ed Miliband lost because he didn't move Labour left enough. I think its core vote is ready to move to the left much more than the party apparatchiks understand. There are lessons in the success of the SNP.

    All Social Democratic parties in the west are in decline because they have accepted the neo-liberal logic espoused by Thatcher and Reagan. The nature of class war has become clear. The 1% are now being joined in the war by the 99% who see and feel the might of their enemy. Probation has been decimated, privatised and deregulated, this is the war in motion, surely probation staff can see and feel the effects of the ongoing war?

    Corbyn is a Democratic Socialist at heart he wants policy to come from the grass roots rather than be imposed from above. Like Tony Benn he wants to democratise the Labour Party, he wants to take power away from the party elite and give it to its membership.

    For sometime I have been waiting for a move to the left I was looking to new organisations or movements to emerge I was not looking at the Labour Party. But I'm very happy to be surprised I have paid three quid and I will vote and canvas for Corbyn. My hope is for a "happening" similar to that in Scotland, Scotland was electrified last year and the political awareness of the people rose exponentially. If this happens south of the boarder we will have a real revolutionary moment and if we can muster up the " Spirit of 45" we can see the end of 30 years of: neo-liberalism, crooked bankers and their mates in Parliament. However it will not happen without others helping to make it happen, people need to get involved now that we have a little hope at last. Remember Corbyn's mate John McDonnell is a friend of Probation ,a move to the left may be our last Hurrah.

    papa

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    1. I can't believe people are still spouting this rubbish about Labour losing the election because they weren't left wing enough. Do you genuinely believe that a large segment of population woke up on election day and thought "Labour aren't left wing enough for me, I better vote Tory instead" ?!

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  6. I'm a lifelong Labour member and will certainly be voting for Corbyn. The Tories may welcome him and the Blairites might fear what he'll do to the party but the SNP wiped changed the entire political landscape of this country with their socialist/nationalist policies. The UK needs someone different and Jeremy is certainly that

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  7. Corbyn's success is not just about tbd next election. It is also about re-balancing the debate in favour of those who dispute the 'benefits' of neo-liberalism. It is about saying you can have your wealth but not until the needs of the majority are secured.

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  8. Oh Jim , Jim, Jim....you are falling into the Sky News paper reviewer trap ...He is not credible, it won't work and YOU LOT are wrong!!
    I for one am sick of been told that I don't see the picture , I don't understand all that "complicated ' Westminster stuff and I should not vote for JC 'cos he won't be very good.
    I believe there is an awakening possible , having been supressed by a multi party austerity package for now longer than the duration of either World War we have been bullied by press, banks, "big" business and many who continue to blame the crash on Labour and refuse to see that capitalism is a "busted flush". The state and by implication the people are now the provider of last resort reference RBS, Northern Rock, EC rail, Serco, etc etc - All should have failed in a capitalist system.
    So please don't you fall into the same trap , let me make my decision on what I want to see, honesty, compassion, social justice, fair tax and yes, I am prepared to listen to politicians with difficult pasts,
    after all MacGuiness met the Queen recently, Mandela too was a terrorist.
    A big problem with our system is that people and especially the young do not vote , they could make a significant difference particularly as we all know the young tend to be most radical.
    I am willing to give him a go as I believe he could be different and i would not have voted for any of the others.
    EXCELLENT change of direction for a Saturday Jim..........

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    1. You lost me when you used been, where it should have been, being! Really shot yorself in the foot!

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  9. He's just keeping the seat warm for the next Labour Prime Minister - Rachel Reeves. She's on maternity leave, so had to sit this one out. Her husband is on the board of Jewish deputies, so she's connected. May be a while but the electorate will tire of the Tories and she will fit that centre right bill. Tony.

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  10. As an ex-probation service Tory (yeah, boo all you like, but I saw which way the wind was blowing early, and got out into a different sector - not unlike many!), I am BEGGING for Corbyn to win the leadership - Labour will be out of power for a generation - here's why;

    1. He's in the pocket of the unions - the British public are (quite understandably) not keen on this.
    2. He wants to unilaterally scrap our nuclear deterrent, and withdraw from NATO - you know, that thing that's prevented a European war for the longest period since history started being recorded.
    3. He thinks you can just PRINT MONEY to buy the things you want. Now, don't get me wrong, I wasn't a fan of quantitative easing for the banks, but banking collapses must be avoided at all costs. Literally, all costs. Can't work out why? Ask a Greek. Plainly this Corbyn character doesn't understand the nature of what inflation means, or why it's a bad thing.
    4. One of his supporters is monumental prat (and confirmed Racist - Google if you don't believe me) Dianne Abbott - A man is judged by the company he keeps.
    5. The electorate is composed more of 'haves' than 'have-nots', and most people have Conservative sensibilities. The most recent general election proved that - a fact which will have lefties flinging their sandals at the monitor, I'm sure. A far left party will essentially just be seen as a fringe pressure group, and therefore irrelevant.

    I'm still thanking God Milliband didn't get elected - after all, wasn't one of his ideas this new election process, and just look at what a clusterfuck that's turned into!

    Of course, I'm sure there are some readers of this blog which are no doubt convinced that Corbyn winning will somehow sweep them and the rest of us into some kind of Communist utopia and we can solve everything overnight (for instance sitting down for a cup of tea and a chat with ISIS, because, hey, their opinion counts too right?), but for the rest of us in the real world, we know that a Corbyn win would really mean the end of Labour as a political force, and the start of them as a political FARCE!

    A Corbyn far left win, would also have the pleasant side effect of allowing the Tories to occupy the middle ground more effectively. Believe it or not (and I'm sure some of you won't!) the vast majority of Tories aren't quite ready to slip on brown shirts and open concentration camps - we're reasonable people, with friends, families, jobs and a stake in our community.

    And as for Rachel Reeves as the next Labour prime minister??? A-hahahahahahahaha (intake of breath) hahahahah! If Corbyn wins, there wont even BE a Labour party!

    Enjoy the elections - if nothing else, they make for great political theatre!!

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    1. This seems like a case of serious delusion.....take two tablets and see me in the morning if you are still feeling like this

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    2. Is that the same delusion as thinking Corbyn might even get close to winning an election? Even Labour say they'll oust him if he gets the rains!

      Communism lite and turn-the-clock-back wishy thinking does not an electable party make.

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    3. Surely the policies win an election.I can't see what the problem is with him. I like him. He has sound traditional Labour policies. The other 3 are weak Tories. I may just vote Labour next time if he gets 'gets the reins'.

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    4. You might wish to vote for him, but it won't be a vote for Labour - you'll be able to vote for whichever looney fringe split -off party he ends up at the helm of though... Enjoy your frothing at the sidelines!

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    5. Oh, and a sizeable chunk of his 'traditional Labour policies' are the ones that they traditionally get pummelled at the polling booths for...

      Vote Corbyn! ;-)

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    6. What appalls me is that the Labour elite are saying they will oust him if he is elected leader. Frankly, THAT would spell the end of the Labour Party, when it cannot support it's ELECTED leader.

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    7. The amount of people that don't see or understand this fact about his leadship spelling doom for Labour is hilarious. The left are reverting to type, resorting to endless introspection and naval-gazing, with the occasional plaintive bleat of "quick - someone else - Do something!".

      If the two female candidates stood down, Burnham might be in with a chance (you could barely get a cigarette paper between their differences), but they've already ruled it out, spouting the usual mealy mouthed claptrap about their vision for the leadship - whereas the rest of us can see they've had a whiff of power and don't want to relinquish it at any cost... even the collapse of their party.

      Pass the popcorn, and don't forget to vote Corbyn! :-)

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  11. Many are clamouring & wingeing about Corbyn taking Labour into the past, the Dark Ages, pre-history, halting progress, reversing time. There are some other old, quaint practices from days of yore. I was clearing an attic & found my grandfather's 10 years' service clock; my grandmother's 10 years' service barometer & another relative's 30 years' service Rolex watch. All are engraved beautifully & of the highest quality. One was a bus driver for London Transport, one a textiles machinist & the third worked in a department store.

    My 25 years' service as a PO has been marked with redundancy, the offer of a package less than half of the contractual figure & a utter contempt from the so-called management team. My future family members will find empty bottles of anti-depressants inscribed with my name, not watches or clocks.

    I see little evidence of the "progress" that the economic fascists prattle on about - just a headlong rush towards hell, presided over by the Tories. At least Corbyn would put a stick in the spokes of the Right Wing handcart & allow those who have been drawn into its slipstream to draw breath, to look around, to see & hear the damage & distress being caused to the country; as opposed to obediently believing the Cameron/Osbourne fairy tales about austerity is good for you.

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  12. What is the point of Labour winning the next election if we are to get another slew of tory lite policies....Corbyn as leader would at least provide those who want to to vote for a party of real conviction an opportunity to do so......power for powers sake or for the staus quo is not an achievement

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  13. I disagree inasmuch as I actually believe that Corbyn would make a very good prime minister and, the way things are developing, I predict that he is going to give everyone a really interesting and engaging ride along the way. This is snowballing and I feel and hope that is going all the way :)

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  14. I am a PO with 2 kids at university.....my life encapsulates the mess we are in......I hate being a civil servant ( a functionary of government no longer a practitioner)....and my kids will have debts so horrendous I almost cry when I think about their futures etc.
    I am thrilled at the prospect of Corbyn as opposition leader because it represents the re-balancing of politics in my country. It is making the lazy Labour Party and the ultra smug Tories realise that they had better start listening to the voters and perhaps more of us will take that responsibility more seriously. Corbyn will enfranchise more in our society.

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  15. "If you want world changers you have to believe in people before they deserve it"
    -Kris Valloton

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  16. All of the anti Corbyn posters, ie Tories or Blairites, are the same people who didn't strike and it has to be said, were the Napo strategists who thought 2 half days would 'really show them'. In fact, I'm convinced that the 'unions have had their day' attitude has taken root in the unions themselves. I repeat, we need to look to the RMT to get anywhere now. We are many, they are few. Stop being so fucking servile!. The French leave their political class in no doubt about who is in charge. About time we had our revolution. No blood needs to be shed, just fairness and decency for workers. If it's Corbyn who brings that about, then about time.

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    1. Napo leadership had no strategy than looking to its self survival. the leadership of napo is useless looked what led us to that decision. A weak chair and no idea what he wanted to apply for a job in a CRC before the war was over was a complete capitulation in front of the members. The General Secretary has made no comment on this inside fifth columnist for the Grayling agenda but what an endorsement for TR. There has been no call for investigation as to what the Chair though the was doing by trying to hold a chairs role and yet we elected him to office. Now we have only ourselves to look at . We have become a crime and punishment agency nothing much gets done by way of a rehabilitation structure. The culture of POs love power control and rigid order. Look at what we have lost .

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  17. "... I predict some keen aspiring backbenchers will be only too happy to nail their colours to Corbyn's mast..."

    But no-one guessed it would be Burnham hedging his bets by offering Corbyn a great big cuddle.

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  18. Meanwhile, back in the CRCs, jobs are falling like scales from the eyes of converts. I will persist in posting this Selous quote until the unions state why it is not binding:

    "As part of the arrangements for the transfer of services from probation trusts to Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRC’s), an enhanced Voluntary Redundancy Scheme was put in place, in line with the terms of the National Agreement on Staff Transfer and Protections agreed with the probation Trade Unions, and funded by monies from the Modernisation Fund to support a sustainable reduction in resource requirements. An initial wave of redundancies was made in advance of the letting of the contracts for the CRCs, and the remaining monies were transferred to the CRCs on a pro rata basis to be used for the same purpose. While we have no plans to reclaim any monies allocated to CRCs from the Modernisation Fund, we have robust contract management arrangements in place to ensure that they are used for the purposes for which they were provided. Contract management teams are in place in each Contract Package Area to oversee each CRC operation."

    Note again: "An initial wave of redundancies was made in advance of the letting of the contracts for the CRCs, and the remaining monies were transferred to the CRCs on a pro rata basis to be used for the same purpose."

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    1. Post it on NAPO then or ask at the AGM . Ian Lawrence competence has to be in question Only the AGM can hold him to account now.

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  19. Part of the process of moving on is to ACCEPT your predicament. ACCEPT that the powers that be changed their mind about EVR . We are NOT GETTING IT. They hold the purse strings and the power. Let it Go.

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    1. Thanks, Elsa. Now Piss Off back to your frozen fairytale wasteland.

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    2. Yeah, maybe Corbyn is prime minister there :-D

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    3. In frozen fairytale wasteland everybody gets EVR lol

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  20. How dare you? NO NO NO DO NOT ACCEPT OUR EMPLOYER BEING DISHONEST ! THERE IS AN AGREEMENT THEY SHOULD HONOUR IT.
    It is immoral for a 'business' that works with offenders to use dishonesty as their operating model.

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  21. "an enhanced Voluntary Redundancy Scheme was put in place, in line with the terms of the National Agreement on Staff Transfer and Protections agreed with the probation Trade Unions, and funded by monies from the Modernisation Fund to support a sustainable reduction in resource requirements."

    Perhaps this is why there's been no fight from the unions? They agreed to the significant job losses up front but got their fingers burned when the EVR went missing. Now they can't cry 'foul' because their collaboration will be exposed.

    "Just sayin' "

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  22. Elsa from frozen fairytale wasteland agrees with Anonymous 17 August 2015 at 14:35 aka "Just sayin' ". There are those that are going for severance, those that are leaving under their own steam and those that are being managed out. Unions have no power now and cant see powers that be changing their minds so c'est la vie. Dont agree with no EVR but cant see us getting it ."Just sayin' "

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  23. Re Corbyn, the powerful are trying their utmost to frighten us, Blair now Brown telling of the devastation Corbyn and his like will bring if they gain power.

    We must be onto something its a rerun of the SNP referendum. Now lets get the young and those that give a damn talking about society and politics. You never know change may be on its way.

    Susan George just been on the radio she said if you want to understand inequality or power just " follow the money"; Susan is a wise woman.

    papa

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  24. Its simple, NAPO has no BALLS, the money was given to the CRC's for redundancies and our union has no stomach for another legal battle. Worried I expect that it will drain the resources of more funds, That would be our funds we paid with our hard earned money. Its not too late to submit a motion to NAPO to take legal action on the turncoats. I for one do not advocate we roll over and give up on what we consider to be our rights. If NAPO wont take the fight go to a no win no fee lawyer and get there advise, then go back to NAPO. I know of several groups taking legal advice on other issues that our union should be fighting on. Vote of no confidence in our leaders in my view.

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  25. Ooooh, its all getting a bit fractious mother.

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  26. To Anonymous17 August 2015 at 23:31 :Your joviality and flippancy , when folk are worried about their futures in CRC is misplaced and cruel. To Anonymous17 August 2015 at 22:39, : Just cant see NAPO taking any legal action. So there are 3 options ACCEPT IT, MOVE ON Or do something yourself. Elsa from frozen fairytale wasteland

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  27. Different day same moaning. NAPO are doing a good job. My pal tells me they are working 12 hour days for us and yet we are not appreciative. Without NAPO many of us wouldn't be here. Thank NAPO

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    1. Laugh...............I nearly bought a round!!!!!! Is that you Mr Grayling, sitting in your 'unimportant' office crying cos even Mr Gove thinks your a useless twat?

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    2. Yes what a brilliant post. 8:06. Napo have done well. I think they might have done a little better though had they had a capable chair than the one who applied to be an ACO in the to be formed CRC. I think they slipped a bit there even you might have to accept that. The GS could learn a little fineness to and understanding of the aggressive middle classes and ruling management that they wield the knife with a smile and a handshake. Had he have known earlier he may not have sold out his hand so early in a belief he was in the in club of power broker rather than understand he was their Pawn and poorly briefed puppet he has become. What another shame that the Chive road team are working 12 hours a day this could not be correct as they are unionist offices they will either be well into overtime or Toil. This includes their ridiculous travel rates. I know hear one official religiously offers meetings anywhere than be at the office. Shame for that but the another no one hardly knows who they are or what do they actually do.
      Had Napo have collaborated with the power of this blog at its peak readerships across the board pre split then it could have won the propaganda war. Yet the GS opted to denounce this voice in the ranks because it meant he would have to fight his new mates in the" hoy paloy" It is a shame they allowed the TUO foolish group to work out how to split the Union in the latest survey mess. Weakend their own national bargaining and effectively limited their own operational life survival. Christmass will see that groupo in grave difficulty as the check off stops collecting their income and the Direct Debits will see members not renkew and no need to apologise or say why. They will vote with their feet. I think your post is good at exciting the anger in readers but whats the point Ian Lawrence should go and if not he needs to be forced. Of course he will want a chunk of money but I think we need an investigation to his activities and he could be fired for incompetence it wont cost us a penny in large settlements before his contract ends. Perhaps a tribunal most likely not many left in NAPO that actually run a decent account holding process and that NEC bar a few are total sham. I hope your post is ruse for dissent if you mean it your beyond naïve.

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  28. Just an aside that may interest some readers.
    Benefits Britain on channel 5 this evening is focusing on (their phase) ex-jailbirds. I'm not sure when it was filmed, but no doubt what support you can expect after release will be touched on. I'll be interested to hear if any of Grayling promises for Through the Gate get a mention?

    'Getafix'

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  29. I'm seriously bored with napo bashing. Today I got a good service from napo hq resulting in a final e mail to me after 7pm tonight. So whilst you were probably giving up the fight... Moaning.... And running home to feed yr fears.... Some we're still working to resolve a union members issue!!! Thank you napo worker! To end.... Dont bother with the usual ear bashing this support gets.... Grow some courage and learn to say what you say on here to your managers... Sudexo... And anybody else who is attempting to trample over us.

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