Sunday, 22 March 2015

Bleak Futures Week 12

On the one hand it's great having a day off, but all it means is catch-up in the days after - a day less to get reports and prison visits done before the next court date. It's false economy.

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Just what I was thinking. We have a Good Friday and Bank Holiday and in my mind all it means is that I have 8 days to do 10 days work in. What has it come to when a long weekend off, when I can spend time with my kids, becomes a burden? My workload is increasing daily and whilst many of the under 12 months will go to the CRC, I'm not sure we have the capacity in the NPS to take more. I have a feeling that the RSR score will be increased this year to take the pressure off the NPS. I'm not gloating or anything and my colleagues in the CRC are likely equally overworked, but NOMS and the MoJ have it in their ability to arbitrarily change the rules to ones which better suit them.

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Really peed off to get a TTG - the original offences were from January but the Bail Act matters were post 1st Feb - the offender was not impressed either.

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One of my more 'challenging' clients coming to the end of a two year Licence - just got 8 weeks for TWOC. We now have the pleasure of each others company for a further twelve months.

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2 years of support and he continues to re-offend? You don't have to be Poirot to see that he is not suitable for Probation intervention. Not your fault I hasten to add but just shows this new TTG is a load of bollocks and is a one size does not fit all policy.

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TTG...I hear NPS are going to buy services for their offenders from TTG but wait...how can they buy a service that does not exist? Oh, I hear you reply. Well it isn't 01 May yet so there's still time...yup 6/7 weeks to set up a service and the staff haven't been recruited yet...TRansforming rehabilitation NOT.

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Takes 8 weeks at least for security clearance. It would be somewhat ironic if the one thing that Grayling broke the service up for was the one thing that did not occur. IMHO I cannot see it taking off in the meaningful form that Grayling envisioned. Anybody on here 'volunteered' for TTG and heard anything back yet?

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I'm from Merseyside and none of us have been asked to volunteer so not sure who's gonna be doing the TTG side of things in custodial establishments.

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About 2 weeks ago there was Expression of Interest in DTV CRC, of which TTG was one option. Unfortunately there was little information which may have led to making a more a informed choice. Not sure how many applied for TTG but as far as I know, no one in my office and CRC applied. I have a feeling that people will start being directed there in a week or so.

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Since reading this blog (including the comments) I keep hearing people's dissatisfaction with unsupportive and ass licking (excuse my french) managers. As a PQF trainee it is even worse. We are seen as a burden and with no support or direction are told to get on with it. Sadly these ass licking managers themselves went through the TPO route and have no clue how shit the PQF is. I hope to see on this blog a post dedicated to peoples experience on the PQF and post on lack of support from management.
Pissed off Anon

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I see OASys on IPPs and "Lifers" that are full of mistakes and it takes an age for the person involved to get redress. The main cause of this is too few staff - workloads are too high. Probation like most state jobs is a bureaucratic nightmare and now with the profit motive driving the show, it is becoming a bureaucratic hell and nothing will change until you decide to fight for it.

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A rumour is doing the rounds at the moment that the interface issue with CRCs and nDelius will take 18 months to fix and cost around £20 million. How true this is anyone's guess.

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I notice the MoJ Head of IT has jumped ship. That might mean something!

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I'm in an ICT workstream and it would appear that this is correct. It was put in layman terms so even an old bugger like me could understand 'Delius has a round hole but we have a square peg, we do not have the means to reshape either without using significant resources' which I took to mean money and time. Lets face it though, we've already got Oasys and Delius.....do we really want another computer system?

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If bids were based on an interface to allow CRCs to use own IT systems, and MOJ are not able to deliver this expectation, rather than CRCs handing back contracts, I would argue it's grounds for significant compensation to ensure they are not financially penalised for MOJ incompetence.

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Oh God, have just read this blog and my brain hurts.......Under 12 months custody and High ROSH = 4 weeks to do full OASys and ISP? Ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha tee hee

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As an outsider isn't that putting the cart before the horse? Surely a full OASys assessment (the governments fantastic risk assessment tool) should be done 'before' the level of ROSH can be determined? And indeed before the allocation to CRC or NPS can be decided upon? Am I reading today's post correctly? It appears to me that allocation of service, and ROSH is to be determined prior to OASys assessment?

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Is it Monday? Must be right then. But don't worry, there'll be another revision out tomorrow where ROSH is determined before the offence has been committed. A new kind of bespoke criminal justice system to suit the needs of CRC profiteers.

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I've heard that ROSH will now be determined pre birth and Steria are developing ultrasound technology as we speak....

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I'm in the CRC so how come OASys all have to be done within 10 days for low/med but if you are RoSH you get 4 weeks? - it doesn't make sense you would think it would be the other way around. Also don't forget we only have to see people once per fortnight for the first eight weeks and then once every 2 months. Why then the rush for the ISP?

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If the EVR end date is 31/3/15, and if the new 'owners' haven't completed "due diligence" to ascertain resources before that date, does the EVR end-date extend? No one in local Napo or our CRC seems able or wiling to answer.

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EVR carries on throughout the TR contract and doesn't end on 31/3. The issue will be application not definition.

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Interesting... Not the view our CRC masters have.

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We were informed immediately after share sale that there was not sufficient money left for any EVR for CRC staff - all went on corporate staff - mainly high end highly paid exec staff. Total disgrace - I know many practitioners would have opted to walk if they could have got the EVR package.

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On the increasing prison suicide rates, the Justice Select Committee said, “We considered it improbable that there is no link between estate reconfiguration, benchmarking and changes in operational policy, including the incentives and earned privileges scheme, and the shift in safety across the prison estate.”

But the ministry of justice (quote below) says there is no evidential link, but reducing suicides is a top priority. If it's a top priority to reduce suicides, then you presumably have some idea of what factors need addressing in order to bring about a reduction. As the MoJ dismisses the 'probable' factors identified by the JSC, then they should be identifying the factors which they believe may be causative. What they are doing is denying the obvious evidence and showing a callous disregard for human life. The MoJ is reaching new moral lows.

“The ministry of justice said that reducing prison suicides was top priority but insisted there was no evidence to link staffing levels, type of prison or crowding levels to the number of self-inflicted deaths across the estate.”

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HMIP is looking for short term secondments.....2 young offender inspections and one (to be confirmed on foreign nationals).....seems to me they are going to avoid the elephant in the room with its massive TRunk....

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Has anyone else heard that Oxfordshire custody cases are being managed by Cornwall up until point of release?

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Not just Cornwall but the rest of NPS South West South Central.

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Yes Plymouth have some.

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Clearly the MoJ and Grayling KNOW it's a mess, they KNOW they are worthy of censure and criticism and they KNOW that the Howard League have the credibility to bring their folly into view. They are frightened because they KNOW they have screwed it up.

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G4S is a private company even though they have public sector contracts so are therefore able to invite whoever they want to visit their facilities without NOMS permission. Or did we become some sort of KGB monitored secretly controlled state and I just missed the announcement?

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They might have Government contracts, but they are not G4S facilities - they are Government facilities run by G4S. That is why it is Her Majesty's Prison Oakwood.

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I think I'll write to Mr Blakeman, to ask why G4S are not permitted to proudly invite Frances Cook to see their achievement! Better do it before 31/3/2015, after which I am not allowed to exercise my freedom of speech, cos I'm a civil servant!

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Such a decision is clearly above Blakemans pay grade even though he is director, and I think considerable fall out may occur over this decision. He will I think find himself holding the sticky end of the stick on this one!

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Absolutely, this has the whiff of Grayling all over it.

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I think Frances should attend the prison visit as planned - with a film crew.

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This decision is a gift for both Frances Crook and G4S. G4S can say despite all of the adverse publicity and reputational damage it's incurred, it's still prepared to allow agencies that may be critical of its operational models to view and comment freely on its practices-nothing to hide here Sir!

Frances is in a position to claim "public censorship" of the real chaos in our prison system by denying her access, getting rid of Nick Hardwick because he tells the truth, and Graylings failed attempts to manipulate his replacement. On the other hand, NOMs (Grayling really), has opened up a can of worms for itself, and I think personally, legitimised all the criticisms from the Howard League for the past two years. There can be no other conclusion drawn, things are so dire through out the prison estate that no one but those who will lie about what they see will be allowed access. This is another ill thought out idea from the MoJ, and IMHO seriously stupid!

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And the next time G4S have problems and the government are pointing their finger at their failings, the line surely has to be, "We would like to engage more with external agencies that have a long term understanding of the operational needs for safe and productive prison practices. Unfortunately, the government will not allow us to do so". Well done NOMs!

48 comments:

  1. http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/565571/Prisoner-s-bank-call-handcuffs

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  2. There appears to be little news relating to the CJS in the media today! And the sun is out too, which has made my mind somewhat playful.
    I was thinking that April 1st is almost upun us. A day celebrated globally by all the greatest of fools.
    Last year, Britians favourite fool Chris Grayling, had his day (also his birthday), celebrated in some style.
    The lawyers carried his effigy through the streets of London. Probation staff donated a days pay through strike action, and he received thousands of books from charities, reform groups and authors to mark his wonderful foolish plan to stop prisoners receiving books by post!
    So! As April fools day approaches, and to mark the birthday of our most foolish minister of all time, I'm wondering how it should be celebrated this year? Any ideas?
    And indeed, what presents should he be sent this year?
    I thought of a lie detector, but I think he would use it less then the teasmaid he got for a wedding present. Oral cleansing lotion to get rid of the bad taste all the bullshit he talks must leave? A lifetime membership to Chenobal nudist colony? A years supply of indegestion tablets as he gets these most terrible 'gut feeling'?
    Just what are we all going to do to celebrate our most famous of fools birthday this year?

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    1. We could always get some 'flyers' made up at work, print them off, pop round to our local Courts and leave them lying on the seats. The flyers will make it clear that, on release, you will be met at the gate, given housing and not made to wait the obligatory 3-4 weeks for benefits. And if this does not happen, please feel free to either email or phone Chris Grayling on the number/email provided on the flyer. Or contact your local MP to raise the matter in Parliament!


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    2. Was told by housing officer from local authority who is in our office 1 afternoon a week. From April clients have to be 12 months offence free before eligible for social housing-starting when released from prison. That's really going to help TTG

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    3. Been that way in Middlesbrough for some while now. It makes little difference coz most cannot afford either the rent or bedroom tax!

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  3. "
    Has anyone else heard that Oxfordshire custody cases are being managed by Cornwall up until point of release?

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    Not just Cornwall but the rest of NPS South West South Central.
    "

    With these NEW TTG close to home Resettlement Prisons could it end up that the prison is nearer home than the probation office?

    That should work out well for visits to family homes to prepare for release!!

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    1. angela cossins replied in a tweet to jim that 'it was no secret' and that 'it was not up until point of release'. Therefore it would be interesting to know a) why this has been arranged in the first place and b) at what stage do the cases revert back to management by Oxfordshire if, not until point of release.

      With regards to Resettlement Prisons I cant see this taking place, the prison estate and escort system is too disorganised for this to happen but i'm prepared to be proved wrong.

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    2. I don't suggest it is secret but just very bad probation practice as I first learned in 1974; that for many, probably the most important aspect of rehabilitation is the relationship with between a prisoner and their family.

      It stands to reason if rehabilitation is to be at the heart of probation work that contact between the actual person who will supervise after release and the people at the client's home needs to be given a priority above that which is possible with a probation team, three counties away, holding a case file.

      Coincidentally - my experience was initially gained as a student probation officer at the former Appleton Thorn prison in Cheshire where I did my first probation placement.

      My probation training supervisor at that prison absolutely insisted that I did an observation in the visits room on a Sunday afternoon, so that I saw first hand the importance of domestic visits to prisoners and their families. I have never forgotten the intensity of the emotion in that room, it informed my career.

      Hopefully an MP in the House of Lords or Commons will ask a question about this before parliament is dissolved.

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    3. you misinterpreted my quote - it was angela who said to jim 'it's no secret'.

      can you see resettlement prisons taking off - I cant.

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    4. I thought I understood and represented Anon at 15:51's quote precisely - I am sorry if some might construe that it was not Angela Cossins who said it was not a secret - I am not sure why she made the openness of the information an issue - clearly the relevant point is whether or not the policy aids or hinders rehabilitation.

      I never believed Resettlement Prisons have any chance of 'working' effectively in ways that enhance rehabilitation over anything longer than a very short period.

      It was one of the first reasons I opposed the Transforming Rehabilitation policy from when first announced in early 2013 - made even more difficult with the closure of more prisons subsequently.

      I had presumed that Parliamentary examination would have revealed the impracticability along with condemnation by serving Number One Governors - who used to be a group Governments seemed to heed generally - (I realise Michael Howard used at least one as a scapegoat) - but it really seems the Liberal Democrat and Conservative Government is totally resistant to informed professional opinion that contradicts its wishes.

      I almost hope Grayling is still Justice Secretary when the consequences are fully experienced - it will be some mess that will need to be cleared up!

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  4. It's all going to hell in a handcart but none of the providers care as long as they make their profits ( which they will, at all costs).

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    1. Whilst I agree that the providers will do what they can to make money, I'm not at all convinced that there is any money to be made. Firstly, they providers are getting the same budget as what previous trust did. From this they have all the Under 12 months to supervise which is going to cost something, eating into the budget. The idea that we would be working out of offices looks to be a pipe dream as the IT infrastructure is not only lacking, but will cost millions to put in place. Regardless we need a base of some description and commercial property prices are going up, not down. And ALL of these properties will need refurbishment for client contact, interview rooms, CCTV, panic alarm etc. Again an expense from the ever dwindling budget. On-going training to pay for which will have to be sourced and a place rented for any training to take place.

      If the budge that CRC's were given has already been dipped into and the profit taken out at the beginning, it will be impossible to continue to offer anything but a token service, not meeting the needs of the clients and doing little to reduce re-offending.

      Which brings me onto the next little gem. Re-offending rates have been falling year on year for the past 5 years. We know this. Police are now scrapping cautions for some offences which may have contributed to this and we have a perfect storm brewing of zero hour contracts, benefit sanctions and weeks to start up a new claim. I'll give it 18 month before not only the wheels fall off, but the cart horse pulling the cart drop dead!

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    2. You forgot that the budget also decreases each year and is replaced by PbR......so yeah, we're f*cked!

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  5. Jan 2015 - "The existing director of HMP Forest Bank Trevor Shortt will join the Sodexo Justice Services executive team in the new role of director of operations – community. He will take responsibility for the six community rehabilitation companies (CRCs) to be run by Sodexo Justice Services under the Ministry of Justice Transforming Rehabilitation programme, which includes Northumbria CRC...“We welcome Trevor Shortt to the Sodexo Justice Service executive team. I would like to take this opportunity to thank Trevor for leading HMP Forest Bank to great success, including level 4 in the prison rating system, one of the highest security audit scores outside of the high security estate."

    Previously at Forest Bank (2011 press report)...

    "Tony Purslow was part of an escort taking criminal Michael O’Donnell to hospital after (O'Donnell) mutilated his own ear. After a “terrifying” attack by a gang of bat-wielding masked men, O’Donnell, awaiting sentence for conspiracy to rob and burgle, was sprung by the gang. He spent nearly a month at large... Mr Purslow – who worked at privately-run Forest Bank jail in Salford – was hauled before a disciplinary committee and demoted to senior custody officer, cutting his salary by £10,000 a year. Three prison officers were sacked after the incident on May 2 last year... Mr Purslow, 50, was found dead at his home in Leigh, Greater Manchester, last week. He wore a suit and had a picture of his family in his top pocket. The dad of two, who made sure he was not found by his family, left a note: “In the end I lost every­thing, including my self-respect, so there is nothing left to live for.”
    Ex-wife Sarah Purslow said: “Tony always insisted he never did anything wrong. He was so dedicated but had been completely humiliated.”

    Trevor Shortt, director of Forest Bank prison, said: “Tony was a valuable member of staff and his contribution to Forest Bank will be greatly missed. Our thoughts are with his family.”

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    1. So, CRC staff beware.

      If it happens on your shiftt you'll be brought to book. Get those ISPs, OASysises, RMPs & everything else up to date.

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    2. Don't get caught shortt...?

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    3. Surely that must read:

      "Don'tt gett caughtt shortt"

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    4. Oh,bloody marvellous! Another prison governor in charge of community rehabilitation. When will these outsourcers learn that they trying to replace vets with zookeepers.

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  6. Just a quick note to say no blog post this morning, but please keep us all up to date with your news, reflections and ideas. Thanks.

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  7. Hurrah for Lord Wolff

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  8. Another strangeways, that'll put a rather large cat amongst the pigeons!

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  9. from independent:

    "Conditions in prisons are as bad now as they were at the time of one of Britain’s worst jail riots, a former lord chief justice has warned.

    The system is in crisis again 25 years on from the Strangeways disturbance in Manchester, according to Lord Woolf, who led the inquiry into the 1990 violence that led to two deaths, hundreds of injuries and the virtual destruction of the prison.

    Calling for a new investigation into the state of the country’s prisons, Lord Woolf, previously England’s most senior judge, told BBC Inside Out North West: “There are things that are better now than then but I fear we’ve allowed ourselves to go backwards and we’re back where we were at the time of Strangeways... Unfortunately prisoners are again being kept in conditions that we should not tolerate.”

    Arguing more needs to be done to stop prisoners from turning to crime again once they are released, adding: “People’s re-offending behaviour has not been tackled.”

    Prisons Minister Andrew Selous said: “All prisons have safe population levels and published statistics show crowding is at its lowest levels since 2007/08. Staffing levels were agreed with both prison governors and unions at the outset, and prison officers have done an excellent job during a period when the prison population has unpredictably risen."

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    1. Delius spouting the party line. What is the point of these people? Lies, damn lies and f****** unbelievably audacious lies that no-one with any knowledge of the issue believes.

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  10. POA press release 18 March 2015:

    "POA CALL UPON NOMS BOARD TO RESIGN - Following the publication of the House of Commons Ninth Report on Prisons: Planning and Policies, the POA call upon the NOMS Board to tender their resignation to the Justice Secretary.The findings of the Report reinforce the concerns that the POA have consistently raised with regard to the safety of staff and prisoners.The continued refusal by the NOMS Board to address the issue of safety within prisons and to comply with the minimum standards recommended by the UK Health and Safety Executive is an abrogation of responsibility.The decisions that they have made in regard to forecasts of the prison population, the use of detached duty, prison closures and recruitment and retention of staff reveals a level of competency far below that expected of senior civil servants.That the Prison Minister can state in response to the Report that the prison estate is fit for purpose confirms that the Minister is either delusional and/or has not been adequately and accurately briefed by the NOMS Board.Steve Gillan General Secretary and PJ McParlin National Chairman of the POA jointly state;“This is a devastating report into the mismanagement of the Prison Service where management failings at Board level are clearly evident. They collectively have administered a Prison Service that is now seen by various independent bodies including the Justice Committee as one which has too few staff and that the level of prison safety has been compromised by poor planning. In any other industry given these failings, the Directors would be removed from their posts. In any other industry given these failings, the Directors would be removed from their posts. There is no reason why the Prisons Board should be exempt. They have failed the public, staff and prisoners”.

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  11. Jim has asked me to say that there will be no post from him today as he is unable to access the internet.

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  12. I've just read an article in todays Liverpool Echo that states the Liverpool Womens hospital is anticipating severe financial difficulties and it may not be open in 10 years time. It states that one of the problems has been claims for 'clinical negligence'.

    It just makes me wonder what happens in custody - how much is the SoS paying out to families where an inquest has arrived at a conclusion that poor treatment ie negligence by a custodial establishment has contributed to the suicide or serious harm of an inmate?

    I think now would be a good time to start publishing any information on relevant cases as with Lord Woolf throwing his hat in the ring it looks like this could be the beginning of the end of NOMS HQ & SoS.

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  13. https://vid.me/U9Qc

    Half way through talks about private probation

    Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Municipal Violations (HBO)

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  14. Just a week to go by my calculation... so what happens to the MoJ monies for EVR handed over to CRC bidders?

    "TRANSFORMING REHABILITATION: ENHANCED VOLUNTARY REDUNDANCY SCHEME

    1.​This Appendix sets out the voluntary redundancy scheme which will apply to employees in a category where there is a potential oversupply post transfer. This is likely to apply primarily to Senior Management and Corporate Support staff posts. The provisions apply in all cases of voluntary redundancy arising as a direct consequence of the TR Programme and will remain in operation until 31 March 2015, last day of service agreed to be no later than 30 September 2015."

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    1. ETE workers in some areas are redundant directly due to TR but I bet they'll be kept waiting until after 31st March to be told they're not needed.

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  15. Do these elements of the staff transfer agreement sound familiar? Are they being applied?

    "• No compulsory redundancy in either the NPS or CRCs for a period of seven months post share sale (presumably we can expect due diligence to have been completed by 31 Aug 2015?)

    • Additional protection of continuity of employment for staff employed on the 31 May 2014 who transfer between CRCs or from the NPS to a CRC for a period of seven years post sharesale, this to be specified in the commercial contract"

    NB - this does NOT cover transfer from CRC to NPS. I never understood why.

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    1. "this does NOT cover transfer from CRC to NPS. I never understood why"

      Because you can't take continuity of service with you into the Civil Service. So anyone wishing to move from CRCs into the NPS better be willing to start at the bottom of the pay scale, leave entitlement, sick pay entitlement and so on.

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    2. "Because you can't take continuity of service with you into the Civil Service." Except when it suits the government to allow this to happen, e.g between May 31 2014 & Jan 31 2015. This was pre-share sale but POST transfer of employment to the CRCs.

      As always, beware agreements with weasels and slippery shits.

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  16. From Justice Committee minutes of evidence, May 2011:

    "Q415 Ben Gummer: I think most of us agree with you entirely about the takeover of a functional organisation by a dysfunctional one in the creation of NOMS..."

    So why has the malignant, dysfunctional NOMS been allowed to continue, to grow & to mutate into TR?

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  17. http://m.ft.com/cms/s/0/b0cfca2c-be7a-11e4-a341-00144feab7de.html

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    1. Pay wall I'm afraid! Anyone care to copy and paste a taster? Cheers.

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  18. UK outsourcing raises pay concerns

    Gill Plimmer and Sarah O’ConnorThe total amount of government work outsourced to the private sector has doubled to £88bn since the coalition won power in 2010 with a mandate to cut the budget deficit and improve value for money for taxpayers.In recent moves, last month some 10,000 probation staff were transferred to private sector employers including Interserve and Sodexo. More than 2,800 top-grade engineers at the Ministry of Defence’s defence support group — will move to outsourcer Babcock on April 1.The government has eased the path for outsourcing with a series of changes. In 2010 Cabinet Office minister Francis Maude scrapped a contractual requirement for private companies taking over public sector staff to hire new employees on the same terms. Mr Maude said the move would “give employers freedom to provide terms for staff which are motivating and affordable”.In October 2013, the coalition made it easier for public sector employees to retain access to their state pension when they transfer to the private sector. Finally in last week’s Budget, the Chancellor removed VAT charges for private contractors bidding for taxpayer-backed work.Outsourcers argue that they have boosted efficiency and saved taxpayers millions. But unions claim outsourcing is a key factor behind the fall in real wages in Britain, which has dragged down overall economic performance.Wages in Britain have dropped about 8 per cent in real terms since the financial crisis, and the proportion of employees on lower pay has increased.

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    1. Although average real wages have started to increase in the past few months, the Office for Budget Responsibility, the official fiscal watchdog, predicts they will still be lower in five years’ time than they were in 2007.Research carried out by the Trades Union Congress and the New Economics Foundation, a think-tank campaigning for social and economic justice, claims that outsourcing has had a detrimental effect on wages and conditions.They say private sector employees are more likely to work longer hours, receive less pay and be on insecure or temporary contracts. Conditions also deteriorate over time, they found.In a study that compares median staff salaries in the private and public sectors, the TUC said that residential care workers — one of the first government services to be outsourced — earn £9.45 an hour in the public sector versus £7.23 in the private sector. Nurses earn £15.18 in the public sector against £13.74 in the private sector.John Philpott, of independent consultancy The Jobs Economist, said large-scale outsourcing put long-term downward pressure on pay, even though the pay and conditions of outsourced public sector workers were initially protected when their jobs are transferred. “Once you get natural turnover in the outsourced organisations, new people can be hired on separate terms and conditions,” he said.Outsourcers argue that cost savings are achieved through improved technology and workforce improvements, such as rota management. But John Tizard, a former senior executive at Capita, says that, with the exception of IT, most government procurement is driven by price.“Given that the services most likely to be outsourced tend to be people-intensive where 80 per cent of costs are labour, downward pressure on terms and conditions is one way outsourcing companies can achieve cost savings,” he said.Damian Grimshaw, professor of employment studies at Manchester Business School, says that although they are providing innovation in marketing, finance and contract management, there is not a lot of evidence that these firms provide “a more sophisticated approach to human relations”.Stephen Rawlinson, analyst at Whitman Howard, said the outsourcers have to make cost efficiencies and this will include reforms to benefits such as pensions and holidays. “That is where they will make savings,” he said.Analysis by the Smith Institute think-tank shows that when G4S took over the contract to run back-office services for Lincolnshire police in 2012 staff were initially transferred on rates ranging from £8.84 to £10.40 an hour.The same job was advertised in July 2014 at £7.36, about 17 per cent lower than the bottom of the in-house pay scale and 29 per cent lower than the top, the Institute said. Staff were also excluded from the more generous government pensions scheme, although they were eligible for a money purchase scheme. G4S told the Financial Times that roles had changed.John Shaw, managing director for policing support services, at G4S, said: “Often through revising roles or using technology to better deploy front-line resources, G4S is able to intelligently reduce costs. In Lincolnshire, where we manage a number of back office functions for the Lincolnshire Police force, G4S staff now support police officers in the logistics and administration surrounding arrests, freeing more expensive police resources to remain in front-line roles.”

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    2. FT ARTICLE CONTINUES: -

      High quality global journalism requires investment. Please share this article with others using the link below, do not cut & paste the article. See our Ts&Cs and Copyright Policy for more detail. Email ftsales.support@ft.com to buy additional rights. http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/b0cfca2c-be7a-11e4-a341-00144feab7de.html#ixzz3VJLh2fgH

      Although average real wages have started to increase in the past few months, the Office for Budget Responsibility, the official fiscal watchdog, predicts they will still be lower in five years’ time than they were in 2007.

      Research carried out by the Trades Union Congress and the New Economics Foundation, a think-tank campaigning for social and economic justice, claims that outsourcing has had a detrimental effect on wages and conditions.

      They say private sector employees are more likely to work longer hours, receive less pay and be on insecure or temporary contracts. Conditions also deteriorate over time, they found.

      In a study that compares median staff salaries in the private and public sectors, the TUC said that residential care workers — one of the first government services to be outsourced — earn £9.45 an hour in the public sector versus £7.23 in the private sector. Nurses earn £15.18 in the public sector against £13.74 in the private sector.

      John Philpott, of independent consultancy The Jobs Economist, said large-scale outsourcing put long-term downward pressure on pay, even though the pay and conditions of outsourced public sector workers were initially protected when their jobs are transferred. “Once you get natural turnover in the outsourced organisations, new people can be hired on separate terms and conditions,” he said.

      Outsourcers argue that cost savings are achieved through improved technology and workforce improvements, such as rota management. But John Tizard, a former senior executive at Capita, says that, with the exception of IT, most government procurement is driven by price.

      “Given that the services most likely to be outsourced tend to be people-intensive where 80 per cent of costs are labour, downward pressure on terms and conditions is one way outsourcing companies can achieve cost savings,” he said.

      Damian Grimshaw, professor of employment studies at Manchester Business School, says that although they are providing innovation in marketing, finance and contract management, there is not a lot of evidence that these firms provide “a more sophisticated approach to human relations”.

      Stephen Rawlinson, analyst at Whitman Howard, said the outsourcers have to make cost efficiencies and this will include reforms to benefits such as pensions and holidays. “That is where they will make savings,” he said.

      Analysis by the Smith Institute think-tank shows that when G4S took over the contract to run back-office services for Lincolnshire police in 2012 staff were initially transferred on rates ranging from £8.84 to £10.40 an hour.

      The same job was advertised in July 2014 at £7.36, about 17 per cent lower than the bottom of the in-house pay scale and 29 per cent lower than the top, the Institute said. Staff were also excluded from the more generous government pensions scheme, although they were eligible for a money purchase scheme. G4S told the Financial Times that roles had changed.

      John Shaw, managing director for policing support services, at G4S, said: “Often through revising roles or using technology to better deploy front-line resources, G4S is able to intelligently reduce costs. In Lincolnshire, where we manage a number of back office functions for the Lincolnshire Police force, G4S staff now support police officers in the logistics and administration surrounding arrests, freeing more expensive police resources to remain in front-line roles.”

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  19. #Napo #Probation Forum- Probation Union warn release on temporary licence failures could get worse if staffing crisis not resolved urgently -

    http://www.napo2.org.uk/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=962#p3716

    BEGINS: -

    "HMI Prisons today published a report investigating three prisoners released on temporary licence in 2013 that led to at least one murder and an armed robbery. The Chief Inspector’s report identifies significant failings that led to the inappropriate release of three high risk of harm prisoners that could have been prevented."

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    Replies
    1. https://www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmiprisons/inspections/release-on-temporary-licence-rotl-failures/

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  20. Early day motion 906 - INVITATION TO FRANCES CROOK TO VISIT HM PRISON OAKWOOD - UK Parliament http://www.parliament.uk/edm/2014-15/906

    ReplyDelete
  21. have you seen this

    https://twitter.com/HMPSurvival

    ReplyDelete
  22. Grapevine news: A fine of £80,000 imposed on private companies for failure to deliver the requirement of an order!

    ReplyDelete
  23. Sodexo and NACRO have fallen out!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of love? Of bed?

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    2. more information please

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    3. Lets take another look at the Sodexo+Nacro bundle:

      Northumbria, Cumbria & Lancashire, South Yorkshire, Bedfordshire, Northamptonshire, Cambridgeshire & Hertfordshire, Norfolk & Suffolk, Essex.

      These are traditional geographically defined areas renowned for their similarities, e.g. none are in London, all are in England, all have people living in towns & cities and I think I'm right in saying all have an airport providing international flights? (Norfolk International Airport is based in Suffolk, Va isn't it?).

      So it surely can't be too big a task for two such esteemed, experienced & wealthy organisations to design & impose a one-size-fits-all community rehabilitation company template without falling out? I'm most disappointed.

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  24. Its worth a chuckle!!

    http://m.huffpost.com/uk/entry/6807008

    ReplyDelete