Sunday, 13 July 2014

TR Week Six

Just in case anyone thinks the 'teething troubles' are getting ironed out:-

Another week and the chaos is rapidly getting worse. Everyone is walking around like headless chickens, we're all running about and achieving nothing. No one knows what to do and how to do it. We are trying to keep to the practice we had before but delius is not allowing us to. Every task as simple as logging a case onto delius takes 3 to 4 staff and about 36 clicks of a button, this has gone beyond a joke. 

Please someone this is effecting our wellbeing, people are leaving and cases just piling up with nowhere for them to go. This has got to stop, and those in power need to stop pretending that things are going smoothly, they are not. NOMs need to spend just half a day in an office to see just how the systems and good work we do have been destroyed. Bidders this is not a good business to get into you would be better off starting a company from fresh and moulding it to how you want it.

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NPS is very quickly silting up, with few cases ending and more arriving by the day...have just learnt that we are responsible for those people who have been given notice of deportation, doesn't matter if they are high risk low risk or no risk just in the community...and we have to identify cases for trainees to manage, so will that be the rapist or the murderer? 

But it is the relentless demands from every angle that is doing for us...the Parole Board and prisons for reports and oral hearings, courts for additional information, recall section for annex whatevers (and on the right form please) ...and we find the oasys is lost in cyberspace. As has been reported elsewhere in the blog, it is the rubbish IT that will do for us finally, as it truly does take dozens and dozens of clicks to complete even the most minor of tasks such as allocating a case or adding a letter, yet we will be held accountable for this if we get it wrong. 

It is difficult to know where to start to provide evidence, as it is the basic concept that is so fundamentally flawed that it can never hope to work as it shows no understanding of the work that we do nor the complex problems of the people caught up in the criminal justice system...but it cannot work and I despair of the total lack of leadership and challenge. It is making us all sick.

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You know it's bad when your first thought on hearing a CRC colleague (caseload 100+) has broken a bone in her foot and will be in plaster for 6 weeks......is one of JEALOUSY....I keep throwing myself at pot holes when out running but to no avail, nothing sprained or broken so far.....Meanwhile slowly, slowly our CRC team grinds towards complete standstill.......

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This week I spoke to a colleague who had lost an entire report unrecoverable and had to start again from scratch. More pressure, anger and frustration.

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'A MoJ spokesman said: “With any change of this scale, it is normal to experience some issues, which is why we prepared so extensively for it'.

That is a disgraceful misrepresentation. The whole thing was pushed through recklessly and the train crash is a direct consequence of that recklessness. No pilots, no preparation. Like cowboy builders, they flicked the switch and hoped for the best. The developing disaster was predicted by many including Probation Senior Management. They will not be allowed to spin their way out of this one.


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Well, as much as I love these blogs, I feel even more depressed than ever. We are all experiencing the same shameful omnishambles but I see nothing that gives me faith that this will all be stopped and the service returned to its previous, high performing status. I dread going into work, feel sick every morning when I wake - that's on the rare occasion I actually get sleep. I don't feel able to do my job anymore - so much bureaucracy and duplication, difficult IT systems and processes - all too much. Like many colleagues I'm looking for the exit.

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Talking about hiding, there doesn't seem to be a place in probation to hide. Staff walking out and some on the verge of leaving. It is chaos to the extreme, data not being put on, cases in a mess, please someone stop this nightmare. I have never experienced anything like this in all my years of service it is horrendous and still no one has any answers only lies. I cannot understand how the powers to be cannot see how the service is in meltdown. Both managers of NPS and CRC are holding onto hundreds of unallocated cases without anyone to allocate them to. Well done Grayling, and as for the Unions sod off for your fucking efforts, you are taking the piss out off us by and are spineless whilst your members are suffering under such conditions.

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I don't have any statistics but I feel as if recalls have increased since TR. Does anybody else feel the same or is it just me?
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Today a client turned up in reception. No idea who he was seeing. We couldn't find him on the system. We look like total fools.

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Jim I agree with you I am getting very restless, cannot not cope with the work, and no action from the unions we need to fight the TR, before its too late. We need to cut out all the crap and take action, and we need the unions to support us. Why are they so scared to take action. Judging from some of the comments we are in meltdown and staff are suffering, can the unions not see this?

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The kids are in bed and I have a bottle of Prosecco with my name on it. Do you think anyone would mind if I took what was left to work tomorrow? It might just help :)

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Once you switch delius on you will need more than one bottle!!!!Perhaps you could do a collection at the office and everyone can have one on their desks, it feels like its a must to cope with this hell that we are being dragged through.

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I've lost a file. Despite numerous emails around the office, no one can find it (probably because they have not even looked). If everyone can check their shelves to see if they have a unknown person on I would be extremely grateful :)

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I've got 23 unknown persons. The file fairy is giving me special treatment :-)

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There was quite a big error made in my office last week. It was no body's fault it's just that we all (incl TM) made an assumption that when we were all one Trust would've been fine but not as separate entities. We're literally learning as we go along.

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New PIs are coming thick and fast to cover the cracks created by TR but, of course, as is always the case when things are done in haste, they only serve to aggravate the situation. I am not sure where this is all going to go but it is an embarrassing debacle for all involved. I foresee bidders withdrawing and those who win being the subject of ridicule within weeks of taking over. They are buying a used car without checking the mileage.

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Well it's either strike or sick. I was told on Friday to expect to do the first appointments for all cases, even if the RSR tool indicates that they are going to CRC. Apparently a new PI that is on it's way next week. I'm not at all sure how mangers think we can fit this in but I hope the clients don't mind me typing my PSR's when I'm inducting them!!

I hear a lot on here about the issues in the CRC. I can assure you that they are just as bad in the NPS, with a chain of command that is longer than a long thing and not one person willing to accept responsibility. All I ever hear is Noms this and Noms that. We are all royally fucked and if this new PI does come to pass I swear by all that is Holy that I will just drop my diary off on my managers desk and walk out of the building as I have just about had enough.


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Sick rather than strike for me. All the classic symptoms of stress are engulfing me. Asthma out of control, skin breaking out in nastiness, allergic to everything, gynaecological disturbances that many readers won't want further details about, sleep totally disturbed - either can't do it or can't stay awake, don't get me started on food, drinking like a fish, not always getting dressed, isolating from friends - either not answering the phone or giving excuses not to go out because I'm busy with all of the above, haven't washed a dish in a week, laundry basket overflowing - it's easier to buy a new tee shirt at ASDA than do the washing. Believe it or not the anti-depressants are helping! All this at a time in my life when I should be feeling financially secure, relatively healthy and I haven't got young or old family people to care about. Thanks Chris Grayling, this is what you have done to me.

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My thoughts go out to you. I don't think there is much more you can do but please keep your local union rep in the loop in case you have to go sick.

Have you ever thought of speaking to a no win, no fee solicitor as your illness is quite clearly linked to the stress of the TR, something which, laughably, your employer has control over. The compensation might be sufficient for a little break for you and your family to help you recover.


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In the current climate we all have to bear in mind that locally we're all at a heightened risk of needing a rep for capability/disciplinary/sickness reasons. I'd never want to go into a sickness meeting unrepresented.

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The issue of "the hat " must now be followed up with the unfair and discriminatory practice that has led to women and BME staff sifted disproportionately - evidence needed and a question for the House I think.

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Couldn't agree with you more, there is a disproportionate number of those classed with protective characteristics in the CRC. This sort of discrimination against minorities is against the LAW and the very things that we fight against to give our clients a fairer more just system, now we fall foul of it. Someone please take CG/MOJ to task with a judicial review. Once the shafting process is deemed illegal the whole thing should collapse. So bidders beware.

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So how comes CRC staff are trusted to do nothing and Serco staff are trusted to do everything? 
CRC cannot create new cases but Serco can.
CRC cannot see NPS cases but Serco can.
CRC have no staff in loads of places but Serco staff are not busy at all.
Basically CRC staff have got no rights left but Serco staff do. 

How does that work?

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Because its a pile of shit and we have been SHAFTED. As CRC assigned I feel humiliated in the way we have been treated. NPS PSO's who have never managed risk are checking my breaches, what a load of bollocks. Only a few weeks ago I was advising them whether breach action should be taken or not. THANKS GRAYLING, HOW WOULD YOU LIKE TO BE TOLD THAT YOU CAN'T DO THE JOB THAT YOU HAD TRAINED FOR AND WORKED AT FOR DECADES, ARSEHOLE.

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I can not tell you how p****d off I am at the moment, shafted into NPS and working in utter chaos having to now work at 3 sites and battling to get my facility time as a NAPO rep trying hard to represent members when the whole bloody world has changed and NO-ONE has any idea of what is going on.

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What about dispute regarding privatisation of probation?
Dispute over no workload management tool
Dispute over the shafting of staff
Dispute over high cases
Dispute over health & safety
Dispute over .....


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Information Sharing. 
I've been reading up on all the legislation for information sharing protocols (I know, fun weekend!) and have noted that the majority (if not all) of the information sharing agreements and protocols as well as legislation, in relation to MAPPA, IOM etc specifically refer to Probation Trusts. When will they all be re-written? Can the information sharing continue legally in the mean time?


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Why do the unions feel that we are not in dispute, every person on this blog has highlighted again and again our poor working conditions effecting our health, people leaving the service in huge numbers, the de-professionalization of lots of Probation Officer, names picked out of a hat, shafting of staff, people going of sick due to unmanageable workloads, privatisation of an award winning service recognised by the world, unworkable IT system, and there's lots more, I am sure one of these amounts to us being in dispute. Maybe I'm not good at all this union stuff but people have taken strike action for less than what we are being put through. I thought unions are there to protect us. LETS STRIKE.

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We and our families are being bullied and discriminated against by a bunch of politicians who represent the elite to which they belong not the people. The fight is bigger than the Probation Service. The fight is about social justice and social justice is the reason many of us joined the Probation Service. On a personal note I'm going to fight or walk away from a job that is tuning into a form of repression of the damaged and vulnerable instead of advising assisting and befriending.

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I'm past caring now. I have at least 3 ISP's that are not completed (might be 4), breaches that are not being done, dinners that are not being ate and offenders who are just being turned round in reception. Why? Simply due to my excessive caseload which at present allows me approximately 15 minutes per person. If something comes up which I have to deal with such as the homeless guy on Friday (why always Friday) afternoon and the food parcel for another person, this reduces the time and allows me to ask 'everything fine, any changes, right, here's your next appointment' before I give them a travel warrant.

37 comments:

  1. "....and we have to identify cases for trainees to manage, so will that be the rapist or the murderer?"

    This is actually a very relevant comment. I've been in the job for *cough* years and one of the things I enjoyed was mentoring a TPO. All TPO's start off co-working low risk cases, first time offenders etc, cases you have identified that the offender is unlikely to offend in the future. How does this work post split? I do not have one offender on my books who I would be happy to co-work, without micromanaging the whole thing, distracting and impacting on my time and potentially undermining the TPO. On the flip side, I cannot see many of my colleagues who have been shafted into CRC wanting to help out somebody who is doing their job, and is possibly less qualified, after they have been kicked in the teeth; it does not sit well. Additionally, will the CRC (post sale) be able to train TPO's, or indeed get paid for it.

    Like most of this TR shambles, it has not been thought through properly. Grayling should be going next week, it might be a good time to put the pressure on the new SoS for Justice.

    Lets just hope it's not Nicola Murray!!!!

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    1. Nicola Murray is flustered. She’s trying not to look it, but she is. The day before we meet, she tweeted a heartfelt 140-character tribute to Phillip Schofield, responding to reports on the social-networking site that he had died on a ferry. “RIP the irreplaceable Philip Schofield,” Murray eulogised, “From Going Live to This Morning - a flawless entertainer. My thoughts go out to his family :’( ”. The only problem? Schofield was alive. In fact, he was live on ITV at the time. Murray had been fooled by a Twitter death hoax. Taking a large gulp from what appears to be a pint of takeaway cappuccino, she now tries her best to shrug it off. “Look, these things happen. I phoned Phil last night, we had a very civil, quite fun chat. I’m sending him a case of Bordeaux wine. According to Wikipedia he collects it. Though perhaps I shouldn’t trust that either,” she says, stifling an eyelid spasm with her hand.
      In the 500 days since she controversially won the Opposition leadership contest, the question marks over her competence have not disappeared; if anything, they have metastasised. The Guardian’s cartoonist has taken to portraying her as “The Iron Deficient Lady”, lampooning her anaemic weekly performances at Prime Minister’s Questions. The red tops call her “Murray Mint”, the implication being not that she’s refreshing, rather that she “sucks”. And after a litany of troublesome “gates” (among them “Wiki”-gate, “Prick”-gate and “Loose Women”-gate), Murray has effectively become Private Eye’s cover girl.
      On top of all this are the presentation problems, the misjudged photo spreads and “Moustache Murray” headlines. When Scotland’s premier satirist Frankie Boyle tweeted a joke about Murray’s alleged “lip whiskers”, he even managed to get the hash-tag “tash-hag” trending worldwide.
      I ask Murray how she would like to be perceived by others. “As someone that doesn’t take herself too seriously but does take the job seriously,” she says. “A bit like Usain Bolt, really. I only wish I had his legs!” In reality, the perception is that she lacks ideas – or at least “non-terrible ideas”, as one elderly former special adviser to Murray told me. “Her gut reactions never produce anything more substantial than political flatulence.”
      The Prime Minister seems to have struck political gold with Murray – providing, as she does, a distraction from his coalition’s own considerable deficiencies. Back in May, just after Murray’s cataclysmic One Show appearance alongside Paul McCartney, the PM famously called Murray and her party an “Eterna-blunder”. The name has stuck. Conversely, Murray’s own attempt at phrasemaking – she called the Government a “Magna Coal-amity” – fell flat. Murray’s fiery spin doctor, Malcolm “Scotch Bonnet” Tucker (who unfortunately denied us an on-the-record interview for this article), has certainly had his work cut out.

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    2. I wonder what does Murray actually stand for. She has spoken in the past about a “Real-volution”. “Absolutely. I care about ordinary, real people. Whatever people are talking about in ordinary places, places like… Dunstable, that’s what the Government should be talking about. But they’re not. The PM probably hasn’t even been to Dunstable. I have. Twice. And both times, I listened to the Dunstablians and spoke to them straightforwardly. We need to re-relevantise politics, to speak in simple terms.” “Re-relevantise?” I ask. “Sorry. I mean, make politics relevant again.”
      So what would a Nicola Murray Premiership actually look like? “I don’t know much about football, I’m afraid.” She cracks a smile; she’s joking. “But seriously, I’ve always wanted to be Prime Minister. Yes, there are tough decisions to be made, but I’ve always loved making tough decisions. When I was young I wanted to be a vet.”
      I mention an online campaign called “Hail Murray” which aims to keep her as party leader for ever. “Oh, that’s really lovely…” I interject to point out that the campaign is not run by her own party members, but by a group of coalition supporters. I explain that it is called “Hail Murray” not because they’re praising her, but because, with her as leader, the Opposition hasn’t got a prayer of getting into power. Murray nods grimly, opens her mouth, but says nothing.
      Within her own party, opinions seem mixed. A source close to her office said: “The million dollar ‑‑‑‑ing question is ‘Why?’ As in: ‘Why is she party leader? Why was she born? Why won’t she just die? Why? Why? Why?’ Christ, there are more ‘whys’ than in Lynyrd ‑‑‑‑ing Skynyrd.”
      But despite reports of tensions, the Shadow Cabinet appears to be in full support. Ben Swain, nicknamed “The Blink Panther” after several high-profile performances of twitchy political slapstick, says he’s “part of the Nicola Murray fan club, though, obviously, in reality, no such club actually exists”. He enthuses: “She’s a real one-off. After she goes, I don’t think we’ll ever again see anyone like Nicola Murray in top-level British politics.”
      Her deputy, Dan Miller, is also a devotee. “Nicola’s a rare thing in politics: a real person. The way she acts, the way she thinks; it’s almost as if she isn’t a career politician at all.”
      My time with Murray is almost up. I ask her about the future. Does she feel she has the support to last until the next election? “Oh yes, absolutely, very much so, definitely. If I didn’t, I don’t know what I’d do. I imagine I’d probably find it very difficult to get up in the morning.” An assistant arrives with another gargantuan cappuccino. Nicola Murray takes a large, hurried gulp. It becomes apparent that she has burnt her tongue.

      http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/tvandradio/9528308/The-Thick-of-It-BBC-Two-an-interview-with-the-Rt-Hon-Nicola-Murray-MP.html

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    3. I hope my manager asks me to mentor a TPO. The second word of my reply will be 'off'.

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  2. The Napo bulletin says it all: NPS AT CRISIS POINT.

    Published 11th July 2014

    Workloads hit crisis point in Probation

    Since the 1st June Napo as gathered considerable evidence that the probation service is in chaos as a direct result of the Secretary of State’s rushed plans to split the service ready to sell off 21 Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) by October this year. Despite public announcements by the Ministry of Justice and the Secretary of State that these are simply teething problems following the reorganisation, Napo firmly believes that the evidence provided by our members indicates that the service is at crisis point in both organisations.

    There is now a high risk of harm to the public with staff trying to cope with unmanageable workloads and a significant cost to the taxpayer.

    Officers in London NPS have caseloads of 70 plus which is 150% above the workload management tool used by the previous Trusts.
    One officer reported that whilst he was able to give 21 cases to a temporary officer, this officer left last week due to the working conditions and as yet the 21 high risk of harm cases, including sex offenders, is currently unallocated and therefore not being supervised.
    In one office they have five temporary probation officers, being paid a significantly higher rate than permanent staff.
    A National Probation Service (NPS) probation officer who has 70 plus cases is also being paid £125 per session in overtime by the CRC to deliver the domestic violence programme, as the CRC has no trained staff to deliver it itself.
    In the South West cases are being transferred from the CRC to the NPS right in the middle of their parole process. This means that a new officer with no knowledge of the case will be expected to attend the Oral Hearing on high risk of harm prisoners. They will be expected to provide a full risk assessment on an individual they have never met before. This is potentially very dangerous and could lead to an inappropriate release or move to open conditions due to a lack of information.
    Manchester area has officers with cases of 70 plus in the NPS and one manager having to manage an office with 25 vacancies.
    Offices around England and Wales are reporting high levels of sickness due to the stress staff are under; and in many cases staff crying at their desks, unable to cope with the sheer volume of work and the chaos the fragmentation has caused.

    https://www.napo.org.uk/parliamentary-bulletin-9

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    1. I work in Manchester and I know for a fact that in one office there are over 100 NPS cases unallocated and in another over 370 cases are shared by 3 and half staff. And most of us shafted into the CRC have yet to transfer all our cases. They are moving staff around, but where ever they take staff from that office then goes into meltdown. Why are higher management not sticking their necks out and saying STOP NO MORE we are going back to as we were because we're not coping. The CRISIS IS IMMEASURABLE ESPECIALLY ON THE STAFF. SOMEONE HAS GOT TO FACE UPTO THIS SHAMBLES.

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    2. To Anon 10.55 those are frightening figures-hope local Napo & Unison reps are aware and have passed info on to National Officers.Might this not be case for local dispute? In Lancs biggest pressures are in smaller offices, trying to run Court services/write reports with smaller team, managing the farce of dual office duties etc and still have pressures that will come from summer leave....

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    3. Similar in Teesside. Staff moving in to cover only leaves that office short, and the problem of being overworked simply moves to that office. This might be a solution.

      http://thebackbencher.co.uk/grayling-get-axe/

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  3. Cabinet reshuffle this week....any truth in the rumour that Andrew Mitchell was slated in for justice?

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    1. I can't see any whispers or indications that Grayling is going....we can but hope though. if he was replaced, i doubt very much if Mitchell would step in to the breach.

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    2. http://thebackbencher.co.uk/grayling-get-axe/

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    3. that goes back to the end of May, which is a long time in politics! no current indication that he's going more's the pity!

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    4. I wonder if he's as stressed as we are?

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  4. Thanks Jim. I am in reflective mood today which makes a change from miserable!
    I wonder if the true worth of your blog will be as an archive of what really is happening as opposed to the deliberate misrepresentation that the employer is peddling. I believe that at some point in the future your blog will be used to support members of staff when SFOs/competency/disciplinary issues emerge and it will be a testament to what people dare not openly challenge with line management.
    As well as the obvious catharsis, posting the truth may be the ultimate protection for us all. The defence to us doing so anonymously is fear: for NPS staff the threat of Official Secrets Act and Grayling's fury at our resistance and for CRC staff the threat that well, exactly the same only replace OSA with code of conduct - for Grayling will be furious at any indication that commercial interests could be undermined.
    I believe it is only a matter of time before the MOJ/NOMS comes for individuals on code of conduct/OSA issues. This is not going well for Grayling and he ( or perhaps his successor if he is replaced in the Cabinet reshuffle) will turn his ire on the workforce soon. So I guess it is vital to keep recording what is happening whilst we can.......

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  5. Would prefer Nicola Murray even with her dissing dear Dunstable........

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  6. Just had a thought, wouldn't it be brilliant if some of the chiefs had the balls to say the following. "Dear Mr Grayling we are sorry that we trampled all over the heads of our loyal dedicated workers who have more integrity in their little finger than we have in our whole being, to carve ourselves good jobs, but, after 6 weeks we now realise and admit that this is not working and we are getting very worried that something is going to go wrong and we will be responsible and left with egg on our faces".

    Our chiefs need to tell the truth and look after their staff before we all walk out. They are in a position of power and should use this appropriately instead of looking after their own needs. If there is an SFO, Grayling will hold them to account, so beware.

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    1. If I'm involved in a SFO then I will be expecting my manager and his manager in the room with me. They both know that high caseloads contributed to both Sonnex and Munckton and did nothing to reduce these risks.

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  7. I have heard that Manchester are in critical meltdown. Managers are superficially attempting to cover up many unallocated cases by employing agency staff and allocating to them. This is being done in an attempt to cover their backs so that should an SFO occur they can say well the case was allocated you will need to interview the agency staff which they very well know they cannot because the agency staff has left and moved on. This is effecting both CRC & NPS.

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    1. Manchester seem to have more agency staff at £27.00 per hour than permanent staff, they have probably used up next years budget. We are in crisis and going to work is unbearable. managers are walking around looking pale, why don't the Chief tell Grayling the truth and admit that they have got it wrong. They will not be able to cover this mess up for long, even agency staff are leaving due to stress. And for some forsaken reason they will not re-employ the CRC staff into NPS. I say let them rot for shitting on us. I hope it falls apart and soon. Our chief has had no regard for her staff paving her own future,she will come to regret licking Graylings arse scrambling to get to the top without one single thought of what she was doing to her staff. And she will continue to lie so that she can look good, which is all that seems to matter to her.

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    2. In our area, CRC PO's are being put through 3 days training to deliver a new programme to Tier 1 offenders. Meanwhile our NPS colleagues and friends are collapsing and we can't help.

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    3. I am allocated to CRC in Manchester. I look around at my other colleagues and no one seems to have clue about what's going on and how to sort this shit out. Managers seem completely overwhelmed with it all. If you ask a manager a question about risk...the response you get is frightening. 'don't know', 'have you looked it up on the policy', 'ring *** and they will know'. I have had one manager who said to me that child protection cases are the responsibility of social services. Was told 'just do the referral and pass it on'. Welcome to our new profession.

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    4. Where are the agency staff coming from ? Are they retired colleagues? Surely there is not a pool of PO qualified staff on tap! With so many been used there must be some question of suitability.

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    5. My sympathy is no help to you - what I do not understand is why are the people having these problems not telling the main stream media directly - I am sure it can be done anonymously if necessary - eventually the child abuse by politician's stuff got out - so can the dangers of probation - otherwise it will be a media attack when things go really wrong , in the way that crimes are committed as a consequence and victims hurt.

      Surely folk can get together in their local areas and work out a media strategy - if they are not able to do it via one of the unions?

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    6. in our area a TM said that the agency made about 200 phonecalls trying to get a PSO but had no luck, as a result we are filling the gap from within the Area trouble is that doing so is robbing Peter to pay Paul. Another staffing issue we have is that people were interviewed & offered posts weeks ago and the CRB clearances are taking over a month to come through and this has resulted in people changing their minds and then the job re-offered and the 6week CRB wait beginning all over again.

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    7. Anon 23.03, there is no massive pool of agency staff soon the Service will realise. One agency staff in our office said that she gets continuous texts and phone calls for work from all over the country. Agencies cannot cope with the demand. 2 of our agency staff in Manchester office have left due to not wanting to cope with the mounting stress and the effect it is having on their health. I don't know how we are going to cope. Staff are also being moved around at speed and without thought or warning, leaving caseloads behind unallocated. It is a monumental mess. Due to stress levels if staff go off sick we will have to close the office. WHAT AN EXCELLENT PLAN GRAYING, ITS REALLY WORKING.

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  8. Last week our NPS started using PSOs to write PSRs, something that we haven't done before. At the same time POs in CRC aren't even permitted to write sessional reports. For us, this is the start of role boundaries moving. Any other examples out there?

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    1. In Manchester all CRC staff have been directed to continue to write PSR's, in fact most of us in CRC are still holding all our NPS cases that we had prior to the shafting, if we transferred them they will go unmanaged, we are not even being pressured into transferring them as there is no one to allocate them to. We are being pulled here, there and everywhere and cannot cope. Strangely, the split is not going to plan.

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  9. Anon 19:57. It has been like this in our ldu since day one. Agency staff are being given overtime to paper over the cracks. CRC staff no chance. I was told nearly a year ago that I would be in the CRC by my line manager . Needless to say we had clashed on several occasions. No shaft just a settling of scores. Which I was not allowed to question as the chief said she had to support her staff.

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  10. The whole system has been an absolute shambles. The selection process to determine who is CRC/NPS is the most discriminatory process i have ever come across. I find it difficult how colleagues are not up in arms about this. Sometimes I question what exactly will it take for colleagues to say 'enough is a enough'.

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    1. Totally agree with you, I think initially those allocated to NPs didn't want to fight or rock the boat as they did okay jack. But as things are unfolding and they are beginning to realise the true extent of what this shifting means they are now starting to feel that perhaps it was all wrong, shame they had no foresight as with their support we could have fought this.

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  11. Please don't assume everyone is the same.NPS colleagues in my area went out on strike and have played as great a part if not more of a part than those moved to CRC especially as many in CRC are Unison.

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  12. What are the effects of CRCs not being obliged to employ qualified probation officers any more? Are some of the locums doing work traditionally done by probation officers, without either a probation or social work qualification - if so what are the unions attitude to having them as colleagues?

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    1. In my area Andrew locum work is only being used within the NPS largely to cover writing of Court reports but also case work.Seems to be recently retired staff in the agencies

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    2. In Manchester Andrew at this present moment we will take anyone that can read and write to help us out.

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  13. I am NPS and have been on strike and will do so again in the future in so we can fight this madness. My experience is that most of the CRC staff in my office did not strike.

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  14. I sometimes feel that any concessions secured by Unions should only apply to those members of staff who are actually part of a Union. The rest will think twice next time and will make it a point to join up. I know what I'm saying may seem harsh .. But what I'm advocating is a bit like civil suits.. Judgment only applies to those people who were part of the suit and not the rest depending on how the suit was lodged. Why should my subs go towards improving working conditions for those who can't be bothered to show unity and strike with me as part of union camaraderie.

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  15. I agree with above comment I'm so cross that union members stay in work especially when what we are fighting for is so important. If u don't want to support us the leave the union.

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